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Full text of "Place names of McDonough County, Illinois : past and present"

Place Names of 

McDonough County, Illinois: 

Past and Present 




M i,OSJ±QUQ** .CQUWTY_CQURX_HP.'J-S5 



By Gordana Rezab 



Place Names of McDonough County, Illinois: 

Past and Present 

By Gordana Rezab 




WESTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
MACOMB, ILLINOIS MOLINE, ILLINOIS 



Copyright © 2008 by Western Illinois University 

This book is printed on acid-free paper. 

Western Illinois University Libraries 

Western Illinois University College of Arts and Sciences 

Macomb, Illinois 61455 

Printed and bound in the United States of America 

ISBN: 0-97777116-1-7 



Front cover images: McDonough County Courthouse, Macomb, Illinois 1872 and War of 1812 hero 

Commodore Thomas Macdonough. 

Images courtesy of Archives and Special Collections, Western Illinois University Libraries. 



THE NEW WESTERN ILLINOIS MONOGRAPH SERIES 
Susan Martinelli-Fernandez and Jeffrey W. Hancks, Series Editors 

Series Editorial ISoard 
Raymond Greene 

Greg Hall 

John E. Hal I was 

Riehard Hardy 

Jeffrey Matlak 

Polly F. Radosli 

David Stevenson 

The Little Road: The Story of the Maeomb Iiu/iistiy cS Littleton Raihvuv (2006) 

Frank G. Hicks 

THE WESTERN ILLINOIS MONOGRAPH SERIES 

Siisuii GlaspeU: I'oice Fro>u the lleurtluiid 
Marcia Noe 

Thomas Grei^g: Early Illinois Journalist 
John E. HalKvas 

Joh)! Hay '.v Pike County: Two Tales and Seven Ballads 
Edited with an Introduction by George Monteiro 

Robert G. Ingersoll: Peoria 's Pagan Politician 
Mark A. Plummer 

Joseph Smith. Jr. 's Red Briek Store 
Roger D. Launius and F. Mark McKiernan 

We .Are Sherman 's Men: The Civil War Letters of Henry Orendorff 
William M. Anderson 

Adelaide .Johnson: To Make Immortal Their .idvenlurous Will 
Shirley J. Burton 

Lincoln 's Springfield in the Civil Wcu- 
Camilla A. Ouuin 



The New Western Illinois Monograph Scries is published by the University' Libraries and the College of Arts and Sciences at Western 
Illinois University. The series supports studies in the history, geography, literature, politics, and culture of the western Illinois region. 
Correspondence about the original Western Illinois Monograph Series or the submission of manuscripts for review for the new series 
should be sent to Professor Susan Martinelli-Fernandez, College of Arts and Sciences. Western Illinois University. Macomb. Illinois 
61455. 



Ill 



Series Acknowledgements 

This is the second volume of the New Western lUinois Monograph Series. When we 
decided to resume publishing monographs in the Western lUinois University Libraries and 
College of Arts and Sciences, we had no idea how they would be received by the public. Our 
first book. The Little Road: The Stoiy of the Macomb Indust)y & Littleton Raihvay. was a 
phenomenal success. Of course, in the scholarly publication business, "phenomenal success" is 
often secret code for "broke even." That was the case here, and as a result, we were able to 
continue with this second volume. We only hope that this book matches the sales success of the 
first volume so we can proceed with a third book. 

McDonough County Place Names is the result of many years of meticulous research, 
writing, and editing by retired WIU Special Collections Librarian and Archivist Gordana Rezab. 
The result is a real contribution to McDonough County history and, quite probably, the most 
complete gazetteer of any county in Illinois. The level of detail included in this reference tool is 
astounding, and it will be an invaluable resource to local history and genealogy researchers for 
generations to come. The Editorial Board wishes to thank Gordana for allowing us to publish 
her book. 

Thanks are due to a number of individuals who helped with this book's publication. As 
always, the Archives and Special Collections Unit staff at WIU, Maria Vizdal, Bill Cook, and 
especially Kathy Nichols, have provided extensive assistance to me as I worked on getting this 
book published. I am lucky to have such a talented, dedicated staff working with me. Sean West 
in the WIU Libraries Systems Unit assisted me with formatting the text and with some of the 
graphics. Chad Sperry in the WIU GIS Center provided some of the book's maps. Others 
provided help along the way. They remain anonymous, but their assistance is greatly 
appreciated. 

Any additions or corrections to the entries in the gazetteer are solicited. Call the WIU 
Archives and Special Collections Unit at 309-298-2717. 

On behalf of the New Western Illinois Monograph Series Editorial Board, we look 
forward to publishing future hooks on the west central Illinois region. 

Jcttrey W. Hancks 

Baxter-Snyder Professor of Icarian and Regional Studies 

Western Illinois University 



IV 



DEDICATION 

This listing of McDonough County place names is dedicated to the past and present residents of 
the county. Without their help I would not have been able to untangle some of the contradictions 
between newspaper accounts, county histories and official records. The names of those who 
contributed specific information arc listed in the bibliography. My special thanks go to those 
who selflessly proofread, corrected, and added to the information that 1 had gathered over the 
many years. The most generous of these were Marge Harris, Lee Ren, Marilyn Shelley, Arlin 
Fentem, and Libby Grimm. 

What was at first conceived as a tool for genealogists while I was still working turned into a 
handbook of county history as reflected in names of places. No one helped me more than my 
coworkers, Maria Vizdal. John Hallwas. Kathy Nichols, and Sally McPherson. They all 
impressed upon me the usefulness of this work and urged me on when I was flagging. 

A listing like this is never complete and can only be as accurate as sources of information found. 
Much effort has gone into checking and crosschecking that infomiation, but omissions, mistakes 
and lack of judgment occur, and they are all mine. 

Finally and foremost, I want to thank my husband, Don, for the editorial help and encouragement 
he gave me. With his patience and understanding I plugged along. He did not live to see this 
work in its final form, but he would have approved. My love and gratitude always, I learned a 
lot from you. 



VI 



Table of Contents 

Series Description /// 

Series Acknowledgements /v 

Dedication v 

Introduction ix-xii 

A-Z Listings 1-125 

Notes/Bibliography 127-134 

Maps and Atlases Consulted 1 35- 1 36 

Appendix - Township Maps 137-155 



Vll 



VIII 



INTRODUCTION 



Place names. They surround us wherever we hve. Towns, rivers, churches, hills and 
schools, they all define the physical environment of the present. But they also tell us what the 
land used to look like, and who the former occupants were, where they came from, how they 
lived, and, most importantly, what they believed in. They arc often the only remaining records 
of past landscapes, events, and ideologies. Like fossils scattered through the countryside, place 
names can be easily recognized, or they may have metamorphosed, abraded, crumbled and 
eroded away. Some are bright and shiny. They appear as highway signs or are part of our 
present daily lives. Others, preserved only in local oral tradition or in musty old records, must be 
dug up and dusted off from years of disuse, irrelevancy or misconception. But all place names, 
whether still in use or long forgotten, are primary historical sources. They are a bridge to our 
past as a people and as a nation. 

The book called Words and Places (Taylor) begins with a paragraph: "Local names, 
whether they belong to provinces, cities and villages, or are the designations of rivers and 
mountains, are never arbitrary sounds devoid of meaning. They may always be regarded as 
records of the past, inviting and requiring a careful historical interpretation."' Robert Rennick in 
his book Kentucky Place Names is more specific: 'The place names of an area and especially the 
reasons for their application can reveal a great deal to historians, linguists, geographers, 
folklorists, and genealogists about the people who founded, settled or named the place or 
identitled themselves with it.... Names are enduring monuments ... they very often outlive the 
very existence of the places themselves or endure long after the reasons for them have been 
forgotten." 

Place names in McDonough County are no exception. Many originated with the early 
settlers who needed to identify physical features of their whereabouts in the vast new and 
unmarked land. They were descriptive in nature. But most names can be traced to someone or 
something McDonough residents remembered, admired, or believed in. Only few allude to the 
earliest occupants because in McDonough County there was no meaningful interaction between 
Indians and white settlers and no Indian names were passed along. 

Place names are the product of a process over an extended period of time. They are 
bestowed by many individuals marking a variety of circumstances and beliefs. It is therefore 
helpful to categorize them. Ronald L. Baker and Marvin Carmony in their book Indiana Place 
Names identify thirteen distinct types of names. 1 have added specific examples from the 
county. 



IX 



Names for a person 

(McDonough County, Bushnell) 
Names for other places, or transfer names 

(Sciota Township, Tennessee) 
Locational names, indicating direction 

(East Fork La Moine River, North Prairie) 
Descriptive names, objective or subjective 

(Prairie City, Pleasant Valley Mill) 
Inspirational names, idealistic, classical or literary 

(Good Hope, Auburn Cemetery) 
Humorous names - often self-deriding 

(Frog Pond School, Ragtown) 
Indian or pseudo-Indian names 

(No name of Indian origin can be found in the county, although references to Indians 

appear in Wigwam Hollow, Camp Creek, and names of Indian chiefs) 
Names from non-English languages 

(Excelsior School, Amicus Post Office) 
Incident names 

(Drowning Fork, Wolf Grove) 
Names from folk etymology - reshaped from their original form to make them more familiar 

(Hiawatha School) 
Coined names 

(Colmar, Fandon) 
Mistake names - bestowed by public officials who misread or misjudged local usage. 

(No such names could be determined, although some of the unexplained coined names 

might fall into this category) 
Names from legends and anecdotes 

(Killjordan Creek, Gin Ridge) 

Land features, particularly streams, were the earliest names. In surxeying the Illinois 
Military Tract and during initial settlement of the tract it was necessarv to identify land features 
so settlers and land grantees would be able to orient themselves and find their lots. But many of 
these early names did not survive. A perfectly-recognizable "Coal Creek" ultimately became 
South Branch La Moine River, the neighborhood of Wolf Gro\e became Bardolph, Bush Creek 
became Town Creek, and Town Creek became Killjordan. The changes erased many original 
descriptive names. Those that have survived still reflect physical properties, such as Hillsgrove, 
Rock Creek, and Mound Township. Most of the name changes arc the result of decisions by two 
federal agencies. The U.S. Geological Survey, which started in 1S79, has employed names 'in 
local usage, as nearly as can be ascertained from officials and residents of the area and from 
other sources, such as previously published maps historical records and reference publications" 
(Maps, p.S7). The Board on Geographic Names, which started in l^)'^)(), ho\\e\er. has been the 
official and tbremost agent of name designations in the U.S. The Board eliminates all duplicate 
names of geographic and some cultural features in each state. With input from county residents, 
the Board assigns unique, K)cally-uscd names, in place of duplicate generic names. 



School names evolved differently. The 1818 U.S. Congress authorized public education 
in the Illinois Military Tract, which McDonough County became a part of Section 16 of each 
township was set aside to finance buildings and instruction. However, the income thus generated 
quickly proved insufficient. Only in 1855 were county governments allowed to levy taxes for 
school purposed. These ta.x records now greatly aid in the research about these schools. The 
1857 Illinois Act to establish and maintain a system of free schools resulted in complete 
reorganization. All existing school districts were annulled and each township was divided into 
nine districts. The schools were furthermore identified by the school district number within each 
township. In 1900 the numbers changed so districts became county, not township districts. The 
two numbers after each school name are the district numbers mandated in 1857 and 1900. 

Law required that children attend schools within two miles of their homes. As county 
population increased and densities shifted, districts reorganized by splitting, changing 
boundaries, or forming union districts. This necessitated that existing school houses be moved or 
new ones built. School grounds were sold, mortgaged, donated, or donated "for school purposes 
only." Land deeds that document these changes are now reliable records of school locations. 
Rural schools existed under this system until 1946-1947 when major consolidations took place 
with Eldorado, Bethel, Mound, and Scotland townships consolidating first. Other townships 
followed and by early 1950s all rural schools closed. 

Because of scanty public funding in the first decades of settlement, most schools were 
private or by subscription. They were held in homes or in school houses built on private land. 
Thus, school records for the 1830s and the 1840s arc hard to find. School sites during this time 
are now mostly unknown, unless mentioned parenthetically in Clarke's county history, in private 
reminiscences or in land transactions. School sites after 1857 are much easier to locate because 
they appear on maps, and are defined in land deeds, but even they are sometimes unknown. 
When county schools closed and their buildings and lots were auctioned off McDonough County 
Times wrote "For the most part... it is believed that the land on which the buildings stand will 
revert back to the adjoining acreage as there are no titles to the land enabling it to be sold" 
(7/31/1947). 

Schools acquired the most versatile names. Buildings on private land were often called 
by the name of the landowner, thus giving a clue to their location. Some were known by the 
name of the owner of adjacent land, and some were named for district commissioners. They 
could be named for persons, land features and incidents, or they were given names appealing to 
children. The latter were often related to animals, such as Rabbit Borrow, Possum Ridge, or 
Robin Glen. Some schools were known by a single name during their entire existence, but as 
school districts reorganized and school houses moved, school names often changed. 

Names of post offices exhibit most standardization, because, from the beginning, postal 
service was a federal function. Post offices were named and their location shown on all official 
maps from the 1830s to the 1850s. They constitute the earliest records of population clusters. 
Upon petition by local residents the Post Office Department in Washington D. C. granted 
licenses to operate an office. The petition was required to include signatures of petitioners, post 
master's name, and the proposed name of the office. If the name duplicated an already 
established post office in the state, another name had to be supplied by petitioners, or the 
Department officials would assign a name. Early names of post offices were often names of the 
respective post masters. Later these names were replaced with names of towns or new names 
were invented to comply with federal regulations. 



XI 



Post offices were required to generate a certain amount of business in order to keep their 
licenses. When a neighborhood lost population and business declined, the post office was 
closed. Resumption of service occurred only when enough business could be guaranteed and 
upon another licensing process. By that time the original name might have become a duplicate 
and a new name had to be supplied. Several post offices in the county underwent such changes. 
National officials also insisted that names of towns and their respective post offices be the same. 
Thus some post offices were renamed after a town or a town was named after an already existing 
post office. 

Names of churches and cemeteries changed the least. Most were derived from the Bible, 
but there are also inspirational names, environmentally descriptive names, names after 
benefactors, and names specifying a particular religious belief Those incorporating a specific 
religion in the name changed only to reflect denominational mergers. Thus, in 1908 German 
Baptist Church became Church of the Brethren, Methodist Episcopal Church merged in 1939 
with other Methodist churches to form Methodist Church, and United Brethren churches became 
Evangelical United Brethren in 1954 and merged with the Methodist Church in 1968 to form 
United Methodist Church. 

Cemeteries could be public, church related, or private. The latter, often called bunal 
grounds or plots, were most often family gravesites located on family land or close to the 
residences. They usually started when a child in the family died. As settlers aged and passed 
away they were buried either in family plots or increasingly in public burial grounds. The latter 
frequently originated as family plots or were donated to a church or a county for public 
neighborhood graveyard purposes. Majority of cemeteries retained family names or were known 
as church cemeteries. 

Names and locations of mills were the hardest to find and determine. Only Pleasant 
Valley Mill and Lamoine Mills had names not associated with a person. All others were known 
by names of their owners or operators, and these changed with great rapidity. The locations of 
the most important ones are found in early atlases, but many mills are not shown anywhere. 
Because they were so important in the early economy o\' the county, newspapers and public 
records refer to them as known entities not necessary to site or describe. 

Place names in this listing were culled from many sources: published histories, maps and 
atlases, newspaper and periodical articles, local government records, private manuscripts, and 
many individuals. Only rural county names and towns and villages were considered. Within 
towns only cemeteries and institutions of higher education are listed. The arrangement of entries 
is strictly alphabetical by latest known name or the most popular name, with references from 
other names. Whenever possible, sources o\' information are indicated in an abbre\ iated fonn 
with full citation found in the bibliography. Maps and atlases consulted arc listed separately by 
year of publication. 

Appended township maps are from the 911 Rural Directorv', issued in 1992. This 
directory was chosen because of its uncluttered appearance, the inclusion of township and 
section lines and township roads, all of which are necessary to locate a specific site as described 
in the main text. 



Xll 



A 



ABE LINCOLN TRAIL 

This was one of four automobile routes 
through the county. The trails, built in the late 
1910s, were known by specific names until 1926 
when they changed to numbers. Abe Lincoln 
Trail led from Springfield to Burlington. It 
entered McDonough County from Table Grove, 
went through Adair, Bushnell, and Walnut 
Grove, and exited toward Youngstown. It was 
marked by an "A L" sign. 

See also Cannonball Trail, Mississippi 
Valley Highway, and National White Way. 

ADAIR 

The town of Reedyville was laid out by 
John H. Reedy and Jacob Grim(m) on August 9, 
1870 (Plats: 1/144-145). It was located on the 
north half of Sec. 15 in New Salem Twp. and the 
Rockford, Rock Island and St. Louis Railroad, 
which in 1870 secured a $50,000 bond from 
New Salem Twp. in order to bring the line 
through the township. John Reedy donated land 
for the depot, so the town was named Reedyville 
and was called by that name as late as 1885 
(1885 History, 901). Prior to the platting of 
Reedyville, there was a community called 
Randolph Comers one mile east. The settlement 
had a store called Shootly and a post otTice 
called Adair. 

After the platting of Reedyville the store 
and the post office moved to the new town site 
and the name of the emerging settlement 
changed to Adair, although it was also known by 
the name of Shoofly for a short time (Adair, 12). 

The name is probably in honor of John 
Adair (1757-1840), a Kentucky soldier, 
statesman, and governor from 1820 to 1824. 
Counties by this name are found in Kentucky, 
Iowa, and Missouri. 



ADAIR MKTIIODIST EPISCOPAL 

CHURCH 

This church was located just south of the 
town on the NF corner of the SW quarter of Sec. 
15 in New Salem Twp., on land donated by 
Washington Williams in 1875 (Deeds: 48/425). 
It is shown t)n the 1893 and the 1913 maps. The 
church was dedicated a Methodist church but it 
was also used by other denominations (Adair, 6). 
Closing services were held in 1926 at which 
time a new church was built in town. The land 
passed into private ownership in 1928 (Deeds: 
153/84). It seems that in the early 20"' century 
the church was called "Fpworth Chapel." The 
name appears only once in the Mac(,)inb Dailv 
Journal (1/8/1908) being located "near Adair." 

ADAIR POST OFFICE 

Established in May of 1867 in the 
residence of Thornton F. Randolph, this post 
otTice was located at the center of Sec. 14, New 
Salem Twp.. in the settlement called Randolph 
Corners. In 1870 the post office moved to 
Reedyville. 

See also Adair. 

ADAIR SCHOOL 

(No. 5, New Salem Twp.; No. 84) 

The first school ui this district started in 
1855 by moving a log house from Fulton 
County. According to Clarke (p. 419) this 
school, called Reedyville, was located on the NE 
comer of Sec. 22. It stood in this location only 
four years. In 1859 George Swango deeded land 
to the district on the NE comer of Sec. 21 
(Deeds: 7/73) where the school is shown in I860 
(School plats), and on the 1871 and 1876 maps. 
In 1881 District No. 5 was subdivided into 
districts No. 5 and No. 10. The schoolhouse of 
District No. 5 was located on the north side of 
the SW quarter of Sec. 15, just east of the tov\n 
of Adair, and is shown in this location from 
1898 to 1925 when it was moved into town. 

See also I.ickskillet School. 



ALMSHOUSE 

See County Farm. 



ALDERSGATE CHURCH or 
ALDERSGATE FREE METHODIST 
CHURCH 

This church was located on the SE 
corner of the SW quarter of Sec. 35 in Emmet 
Twp, on the western edge of Macomb. The 
congregation was formed in 1968 by merger of 
the Colchester and Macomb Free Methodist 
churches. The sanctuary was built in 1971. The 
church ceased to function in 1997 and the 
building became Victory Baptist Church. 

The name comes from a street in 
London, which was the location of the religious 
society which John Wesley joined and where on 
May 24, 1738 he claimed to have been 
converted to the doctrine of saving grace. 

See also Victory Baptist Church. 

ALTON & ROCK ISLAND RAILROAD 

This railroad line was shown only on the 
1861 map. It was planned to cross the county 
from northwest Sciota Twp. through Macomb 
and Industry, but was never built 

AMICUS POST OFFICE 

See Sciota Post Office. 

AMOS WOODS 

See Ferster Woods. 

ANDERSON (FAMILY) GRyWEYARD 

See Huff Cemetery. 

ANDREWS STOP or SWITCH 

This stop of the Macomb, Industry & 
Littleton Railroad was located on the line 
between the SW quarter of Sec. 36 in Chalmers 
and the SE quarter of Sec. 3 1 in Scotland 
townships. It was located on Andrews land 
holdings on both sides of the track. The stop 
was used by passengers and was also a loading 
dock lor farm products and animals. 

ANTIOCII ( IIUIU II 

Orgam/etl m 1X41, the congregalion 
built a house of worship in IS43 on land deeded 
hy James lAlmonslon in the NW coiiicr of iho 
plat of Mnlclletoii, later renamed I'aiulon The 
eluMch CMsletl oiiK until IS49. || was one of 
three Reuular I'reilestuialion Raplisl, ( )KI School 



Baptist, or Primiti\e Baptist congregations in the 
county, the others being Union Church in Bethel 
Township, and Concord Baptist Church. When 
the church dissolved most members joined the 
Union Church housed in the old Antioch 
sanctuary (Webb). 

Antioch is a city in ancient Syria in 
which Christianity began. It has been a favorite 
name tbr churches. 

See also Union Church (Bethel Twp.). 

ARBOGAST CEMETERY 

See Pearce Cemetery. 

ARCHER - BETHEL CEMETERY 

Located on the NE quarter of Sec. 8 in 
Bethel Twp., this cemetery was platted in 1884 
as Sullivan Cemetery (Plats: 2/22), because 
James Sullivan owned land northeast of the 
cemetery, but the 1885 history of the county 
called it Archer Burying Ground (1885 History, 
708), probably because it evolved from a private 
burial plot of the Archer family. The cemetery is 
also known as West Bethel Cemetery and 
Mathews Cemetery (Genealogy: 17:2/32; 
Cemeteries: 5/22). The earliest burials date 
from the 1850s. The cemetery is still in use. 

ARCHER BURYING GROUND 

See Archer - Bethel Cemetery. 

ARGYLL 

This was the name of a neighborhood 
centered on Sec. 36 in Hire Twp. The settlement 
cluster was on the important Beardstown - 
Burlington road which forded the Fast Fork La 
Moine Ri\er in this location. 

Argyle is the name of a city and county 
in Scotland 

See also Argyle Hollow. 

ARGYLE BIBLE C HURCH 

Organized in 1834 as "Bersheba," this 
Cumberland Presbyterian Congregation met tor 
20 \ears in the residence of Ji>hn McCord and 
I he barn oi' (ieorge W. Welch in the 
southwestern part ot Inimet iwp. In IS54 
members built a eluiich on the present church 
site, the NW corner of the SW quarter of Sec. 36 
III Hue I'wp . on land doiuilcd b\ (ieorge Welch 



in 1863 (Mortgages; Q/330). The sanctuary was 
used jointly by Presbyterians and Baptists. Prior 
to the building of a new sanctuary in 18S5 the 
congregation was renamed "Argyle." It existed 
until 1964 at which time it dissolved and the 
building became place of worship for a non- 
denominational congregation called the Argyie 
Bible Church or Open Bible Church (Harris, 
M.). This is an active rural church. 

Beersheba was an Old Testament village 
near the border of Judah. It is thought to mean 
"well of the oath," indicating a dependable 
source of water. 

ARGYLE BRANCH or CREEK 

See Argyie Hollow. 

ARGYLE CEMETERY 

This large cemetery is located on the 
north side of the SW quarter of Sec. 36 in Hire 
Twp.. Just east of the Argyie Church. An 1870 
plat of the SW quarter of Sec. 36 shows both the 
church and the cemetery (Deeds: 29/434), but 
the cemetery appears on maps only from 1913 
on. It is still in use. 

ARGYLE CUMBERLAND 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

See Argyie Bible Church. 

ARGYLE FORD 

See Argyie. 

ARGYLE HOLLOW 

Formed by a tributary of the East Fork 
La Moine River, this ravine was part of the stage 
coach road from Beardstown to Burlington. 
The sides of the ravine exposed coal scams and 
featured in later years many drift coal mines. 
The hollow is now part of Argyie Lake. 

In 1836 the stream in the hollow was 
known as Hammer Branch (Commissioners: 
A/288). No reason could be found for the name 
Hammer. At the time Argyie Lake was created 
the stream was known as Welch's Creek, after 
Charles Welch family, which owned land on 
both sides of the ravine (Welch). Welch family 
holdings are shown on the 1871 map. 

See also Ragtown. 



ARCJYLE LAKE STATE PARK 

Located at the juncture of Hire, I-nnncl 
and Colchester townships, this park was 
established in 1949 by damming a tributary of 
the East Fork La Moine River, Hooding small 
stream valleys, and acquiring adjacent land. 

ARGYLE POST OFFICE 

This post office started on February 1, 
1841. The name changed to Pleasant Valley 
Mills P.O. on March 24, 1843, but services 
stopped on October 9, 1846. Reestablished as 
Argyie on May 1, 1848 with George W. Welch 
as postmaster, the post office discontinued on 
May 10, 1858, reopened on June 22, 1858, and 
finally closed on December 29, 1860. 

ARGYLE SCHOOL 
(No. 7 Hire Twp.; No. 46) 

This school was located on the NW 
comer of Sec. 36, half a mile north of the Argyie 
church and the cemetery. On the 1919 map the 
school called Martin, probably honoring the 
Martin family which owned land nearby. It 
shows on maps as early as 1871, but no deed of 
origin could be found. It closed in 1947. The 
1956 deed conveys the property to Argyie 
Presbyterian Church (Deeds: 230/97) 

ATEN SCHOOL 

See Pleasant Gale School. 

ATKINSON CEMETERY 

Located near the center of Sec. 3 1 in 
Emmet Twp., this cemetery is also known as 
McCord Cemetery. It does not show on any 
map. The names are after Atkinson and McCord 
tamilies. Job Yard, Sr., buried in 1839, is the 
oldest intemient. He owned land in the NW 
quarter of Sec. 31. His widow married Simon 
Atkinson. William Willard. a veteran of the 
Revolutionary War, and father of Mrs. McCord 
is buried here. The cemetery is locally famous 
for the headstone of "Jack, the Black Man of 
John McCord," who died between 1850 and 
1860. It is an unusual loving memorial to a 
black persim in a white family graveyard. 

AYR'S MILL 

See Eyre's Sawnuli. 



B 



BACON or BACON'S MILL 

In 1832 Charles W. Bacon obtained 
permission to build a mil! (Commissioners: 
A/116). The 1861 map shows "Bacon's Mill" 
on the south side of the East Fork La Moine 
River on the SW quarter of the NE quarter of 
Sec. 5 in Colchester Twp., just below the mouth 
of the Spring Creek. The mill was an important 
point of reference in early records (Clarke, 72; 
1885 History, 591, 1046; RSR, 8) because it was 
located on the Macomb-Carthage Road and on 
the road from Job's Settlement to the 
"Desmoine" or Lower Rapids (Commissioners; 
A/223). Lewis Mourning operated the mill in 
1833 and Tom Bacon m 1835 (Moon, 10). 
According to Alex Holmes it stopped operation 
prior to 1853 (MJ, 4/3/1925). Bacon Mill was 
about one mile downstream from McDonald's 
Mill and in 1840 the McDonough Circuit Court 
handled a case where it was alleged that water 
from Bacon's Mill backed up and obstructed the 
operation of McDonald's Mill. 

See also Phelps Mill. 

BACON or BACON'S PRAIRIE 

Located "below Macomb" ( 1 885 
History. 105), this prairie was named after the 
influential Bacon family. Bacon's Prairie, 
located between Crooked Creek and 
Troublesome Creek is mentioned already in 
1832 (Commissioners: A/87). It was probably 
named after Charles B. and Thomas who were 
road surveyor and supervisor. The name 
persisted with the arrival in 1834 of Joseph 
Bacon whose son Larkin in 1871 owned much 
land between Tennessee and Hillsgrove. 

BACON'S ADDITION 

See Hillsgrove Station. 

BACON WOODS 

This is a subdivision of Macomb located 
on tiic north half of Section 12 m Ciiaimcis 
rwp. 



B.VC.BY SCHOOL 

(No. 7, Emmet Twp.; No. 55) 

This school was built in 1876 on the SW 
comer of Sec. 13, on land donated by Martha 
Stapp (Deed: 41/252). An older school building 
existed in the same location, but no land record 
could be found to verify the building date, 
although a school building is indicated in this 
location on county maps starting in 1861. 
Macomb Dailv Journal for Feb. 10, 1915 carried 
a notice that "Bagby School District 55 burned 
and was rebuilt" (p. 5). The school was named 
either after Byron Bagby, a school trustee, or 
John C. Bagby, an Illinois State Representative 
in 1876. The most recent name of the school 
was McKee, but this name was not much in use. 
The name comes from Aaron P. McKee, owner 
of the land on the adjacent SE quarter of Sec. 14. 

The school consolidated with Crabb 
School and the grounds reverted to private 
ownership in 1952 (Deeds: 206/508). 

BAGBY'S CREEK OR FORK 

This was the earliest name for the South 
Branch La Moine River in Blandinsville Twp. It 
is called thus on Morse Map of 1844 and 
Coulton Map of 1868. The name comes from 
John Bagby, an early settler of Blandinsville 
Twp. 

See also Coal Creek and La Moine 
River. 

BAILEY CEMETERY 

Located on the SW corner of Sec. 12 
and the adjoining SE comer of Sec. 1 1 in 
Chalmers Twp., this cemetery started in 1857. 
The name derives from the W.S. Bailey family, 
which in 1871 owned the land on which the 
cemetery is located. No Baileys are known to 
have been buried here. The cemeten. is shown 
on all major maps, but no land deed could be 
found. 

BAILEY "HOLLER " or HOLLOW 

This hollow starts in the SF comer of 
Sec. I I and extends southward through Sec. 14 
of Chalmers Twp. It is named tor the Bailev 
iamiK. wlucli owiicil land on both sides of the 
luiliow (Pace). 



BAKER AND MCDONALD'S MILL 

See McDonald's Mill. 

BALANCED ROCK 

See Rattlesnake Den Hollow. 

BANKS CEMETERY 

Located on the SW quarter of Sec. 30 in 
Hire Twp., this cemetery is not shown on maps. 
The name derives from the Vandever Banks 
family, which settled on Section 30 in 1835. 
Numerous family members are buried here. 

BAPTIST CEMETERY No. 1 

See Bethel Baptist Cemetery. 

BAPTIST CEMETERY No. 2 

See New Hope Cemetery. 

BAPTIST CREEK 

Running through Blandinsville and Hire 
townships in west-southwest direction. Baptist 
Creek joins La Harpe Creek in the NW quarter 
of Sec. 16 of Fountain Green Twp. in Hancock 
Co. The name derives from the sizable Baptist 
community that settled near the creek and was 
headed by John Logan. 

Early local name for the creek was Job's 
Creek (Commissioners: A/83), after the Job 
brothers who settled there in 1 826, but the early 
mapmakers had other names. The Augustus 
Mitchel map of 1834 shows "Cross Creek" and 
so does the Lewis Robinson map of 1838. By 
1844 the creek is widely known as Job's. Morse 
map labels the creek "Job's," and in 1865 
Samuel Coats, the postmaster of Blandins\ille, 
calls it "Jobe's Creek" (Site). The 1885 history 
of the county also mentions that the creek "is 
called Job's Creek" (1885 History, 63). By the 
end of the 19"^ century however, the name Job 
fell into disuse. In 1896 Hattie Holliday, the 
postmistress of the Blandinsville P. O., calls the 
creek "Big Creek" (Site), probably to distinguish 
it from the Little Creek, a tributary of the La 
Harpe Creek. In 1919 the USGS map shows 
Baptist Creek. It is not known when the creek 
got its present name. 

See also Job's Settlement. 



BAPTIST MEETING HOUSE 

This place is mentioned in 1 842 
(Commissioners: B/212) as being located on 
Sec. 4 in Hire Twp. in what would have been 
Job's Settlement. 

BARBER CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the SE 
comer of the NE quarter of Sec. 19 in Colchester 
Twp., on land originally owned by John D. 
Barber. Burials date from 1833 to the 1880s. 
This cemetery is shown in the atlases of 1871, 
1893, and 1913. 

BARDOLPH 

Located on the NE quarter of Sec. 24 in 
Macomb Twp., the town was laid out on Sept. 1 , 
1854 by George W. Parkinson, W. C. Chambers, 
William II. Randolph, and Charles Chandler to 
take advantage of the newly planned Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy Railroad line (Deeds: 
V/172). The plat was originally unnamed, but 
subsequently "Town of Randolph" was added to 
the empty space. In 1856 another plat was filed, 
this time called "Bardolph" (Mortgages: F/442). 
Apparently during its first two years of existence 
Bardolph was called Randolph after William II. 
Randolph, one of the town's organizers. But the 
name had to be changed in 1856 because Illinois 
already had a town called Randolph. 
Chapman's map of Illinois for 1857 calls the 
town "Bardolph," and so does the 1871 atlas of 
the county, but the geological map of the state of 
Illinois for 1875 shows "Randolph." The 
explanation might be that the geological map 
was compiled by Amos Worthen, the state 
geologist from Hancock County, who knew 
Bardolph by its locally popular name. William 
Randolph was county sheriff diiring the Civil 
War and was murdered while apprehending an 
unwilling recruit. The name "Randolph" 
reflected the honor in which kical people held 
their sheriff 

Bardolph is one of few coined names in 
the county. No explanation could be found for 
the "Bar" part of the name. Prior to the platting 
of the town the neighborhood was known as 
Wolf Grove. 

See also Wolf Grove. 



BARDOLPH CEMETERIES 

See New Bardolph and Old Bardolph 
Cemetery. 

BARDOLPH POST OFFICE 

This post office is the successor to the 
Wolf Grove Post Oftlce. It was established on 
July 9, 1856, with Rev. William H. Jackson as 
the first postmaster. 

See also Wolf Grove Post Office. 

BARKER CREEK 

Flowing east through sections 2 and 1 of 
New Salem Twp.. Barker Creek joins the Spoon 
River in Harris Twp., Fulton Co. This stream is 
probably named for John Barker who in 1828 is 
said to have lived nine miles northeast from 
Pennington's Point (Clarke, 68) and who 
preached the first sermon in Chalmers Twp. in 
1830 (1885 History, 820). John Barker is also 
listed in the 1830 Census of Fulton County. 

BARNES CEMETERY 

See Bedford Cemetery. 

BARTLETT'S SETTLEMENT 

According to Peck, this was an 
"extensive settlement in the southwestern part of 
the county on Crooked Creek, 15 miles from 
Macomb" (Peck, 153). 

The Bartletts in question must have been 
Nathan, Isaak, Jesse, and Ebenezer. who were 
prominent in the early running of county 
government. The 1830 Census lists Nathan and 
Isaak Bartlett in Macomb Twp., but in 1834 and 
1835 the County Commissioners Court appoint 
Isaak as road viewer from Macomb to the SW 
corner of the county (Commissioners; A/193. 
222). Deed records place the Bartletts m 
Lamoine Twp. In 1819 Ebenezer Bartlett sold 
his war deed for the SE quarter of Sec. 19 in 
Lamoine Twp. (Deeds: E/190). while in 1838 
Jesse Bartlett, already a county resident, 
purchased the NW quarter of Sec. 25 in Lamoine 
Twp. (Deeds: E/177). It is possible that Peck 
found the Barllctts ui what later became known 
as the Lamoine Settlement, but this ciiuld not be 
verified Ihe 1840 Census dt)es not list any 
Bartletts m liic county. 



BAYLES CEMETERY 

See White Flock Cemetery. 

BEAN CEMETERY 

Located on the SE quarter of the NE 
quarter of Sec. 7 in Colchester Twp., this 
cemetery is well marked on all maps, but no 
deeds could be located. The cemetery is named 
for the Bean family, who owned land just east in 
Sec. 8 and whose many members are buried 
here. The cemetery contains the grave of Joseph 
Barnes Bacon, a veteran of the War of 1812. 

BEAN SCHOOL 

(No. 3, Colchester Twp.; No. 103) 

This school was first located on the SE 
comer of the NW quarter of Sec. 17, on land 
deeded by John C. Bean in 1868 (Deeds; 27/40). 
It is shown here on the 1871 atlas map. The 
1872 deed from D. Sherbine conveyed to school 
trustees land located near the center of the NW 
quarter of Sec. 8 (Deeds; 35/78), and the school 
appears in this latter location from 1893 on. The 
grounds were sold off in 1950 (Deeds; 213/227). 

BEAN'S MILL 

In 1837 Robert Bean received 
permission to build a dam and nnll on the west 
side of the SE quarter of Sec. 10 in Tennessee 
Twp., on the East Fork La Moine River 
(Commissioners: Ay341) and is known to have 
purchased the SW quarter of Sec. 10 in 1840 
(Deeds: Z/158). In 1850 Robert Bean is listed as 
the operator of a water-powered saw mill on 
Crooked Creek (Products of Industr>). Another 
mention of the mill is found in 1850 when there 
is a petition for a road "from Middlcton to 
Bean's Mill on Crooked Creek" 
(Commissioners: C/ 135). The 1861 map shows 
a bridge over Crooked Creek on the NE quarter 
of the NW quarter of Sec. 15 in Tennessee Twp., 
but no null appears m this location on any map. 

BECKELinMKR CEMETERY 

This bur\ ing ground, K>cated in ihe SH 
quarter of Sec. 15 in Sciota Twp.. now contains 
only one gra\e. Other burials were iiuned to the 
Good Hope Cemetery in Sec. 30 o( Walnut 
Gro\e Iwp. (Harris, M.). Ihe site is not 
itleiitilicd on an\ map flic solilaiy gra\ e is that 



of Sarah A., wife of Alexander Heekelliynier. 
but the site is loeated on hind, which at burial 
time belonged to John W. Lowe. No 
relationship could be established. 

BECKFORD BRANCH 

This stream originates in Birmingham 
Twp., Schuyler County, then Hows east- 
northeast and empties into the La Moine River 
in Sec. 34 of Lamoine Twp. The origin of the 
name could not be established. 

BEDFORD 

This settlement appears on Colton's map 
of 1868. It is located on Sec. 32 in Henderson 
County. It was a neighborhood which straddled 
the county line between sections 5 and 6 of 
Blandinsville Twp. and 31 and 32 of Bedford 
Twp. in Henderson County. The population was 
at one time four or i'wc families, but by 1882 all 
residences were gone and only the churcli 
remained. 

BEDFORD BRICK MEETING HOUSE 

See Old Bedford Church. 

BEDFORD CEMETERY 

This cemetery, also known as Barnes 
Cemetery, is located on the NW comer of the 
NE quarter of Sec. 6 in Blandinsville Twp., half 
a mile west of the Old Bedford Christian 
Cluirch. The cemetery is on land v\hich .lohn and 
Charles Huston donated to the Christian Church 
of Bedford in 1877 (Deeds: 43/290), although 
the first burials date from the 1830s. The 
cemetery appears on all maps of the county 
starting in 1871. 

BEDFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

This church was organized in 1849 as 
Bedford Christian Church. Its roots, like that of 
Blandinsville Christian Church go back to 
Liberty (Christian) Church in the Muddy Lane 
neighborhood. The first sanctuary was built in 
1854 in Henderson County, just northwest of the 
present building site. It was called the Old Brick 
Church. 

In 1857 James M. Payne quit claimed a 
deed to the trustees of the Christian Church at 
Bedford for a lot of land on which the "Bedford 



Brick Meeting House now stands," which was 
on the NW corner of Sec. 5 in Blandinsville 
Twp. (Deeds: 5/4 Ui). The 1861 map, however, 
shows the church on the NF, comer of Sec. 6. In 
1868 John Goodnight deeded to the tmstees of 
the "Christian Church at Bedford" land on the 
NW quarter of Sec. 5 (Deeds: 51/336), but the 
1898 map shows the church on the NW comer 
of Sec. 5. The 1913 map shows the church 
correctly on the north side of the NW quarter of 
Sec. 5. This is the site of the present church 
built in 1922. "Bedford Church," as it is locally 
known, is an active rural church that serves both 
McDonough and Henderson County residents. 

The name derives from the Bedford 
neighborhood in McDonough and Henderson 
counties, a settlement on the stage coach route 
between Beardstown and Burlington. A post 
office in the area, known as Muddy Lane, was 
called "Bedford" in I 848- 1 849. 

The name "Bedford" is found in 
Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, 
Virginia, and Tennessee. It is thought to derive 
from Duke of Bedford or Bedfordshire in 
England. 

BEDFORD P. O. 

See Muddy Lane Post Oftlce. 

BELLS CREEK 

See Bronson Creek. 

BERRY PATCH 

This is a Colchester subdivision along 
the present Colorado Road in the south half of 
Sec. 5 in Colchester Twp. 

BERSHEBA 

See Argyle Bible Church. 

BETHANY FREE METHODIST CHURCH 

This church was located on the NW 
corner of the SE quarter of Sec. 32 in Eldorado 
Twp. The land was deeded in 1849 to "Free 
Methodist Church" by John W. Adams (Deeds: 
75/515), who in 1884 also deeded land to school 
trustees of the Chockley School District. There 
is no e\ idence that a school was ever built here, 
but a church is shown ou the 1919 map. In 1947 
the land was sold (Deeds: 204,551). and the 



church was moved to the location of the 
Pennington Point Church, which had burnt down 
(Bloomer). 

Bethany is a village in Palestine where 
Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead. It is a 
favorite name for religious institutions. 

BETHEL BAPTIST CEMETERY 

Located on the SW quarter of Sec. 10 in 
Bethel Twp., the cemetery is also known as 
Bethel Cemetery or Baptist Cemetery No. 1 . It 
started in 1847 with Union Baptist Church. It is 
not used any more. 

Bethel is a place 10 miles north of 
Jerusalem. According to Genesis, Jacob called 
the place Bethel - meaning "house of God" 
because it was where he dreamt of angels. The 
name is used for churches and settlements. 

See also Union Church (Bethel Twp.). 

BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH 

Organized February 26, 1872 as a 
Regular Baptist Church and named the First 
Baptist Church of Bethel Township, the 
congregation was also known as West Bethel 
Baptist Church (Shelley). Meetings were first 
held in the building of the New Hope Methodist 
Church in Bethel Twp. The congregation built 
its own sanctuary in 1876 on the NW corner of 
the NE quarter of the SE quarter of Sec. 8 in 
Bethel Twp., across the road from the Archer- 
Bethel Cemetery. A land deed from John M. 
Dunsworth to the "First Baptist Church of 
Bethel Township" dated 1876, confirms the date 
and location (Deeds: 40/299). In 1948 the 
church was rebuilt, and in 1955 West Bethel 
Baptist Church was named Bethel Baptist 
Church. This is still an active congregation. 

BETHEL CEMETERY 

See Bethel Baptist Cemetery. 

BETHEL METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CIILJRC H 

Sec New Hope Methodist Episcopal 
( lunch. 



BETHEL TOWNSHIP 

This is Congressional Township 4 
North, 3West from the 4* Principal Meridian. 
The original name of the township was "Eagle 
Town." The first settler in the township was 
John Gibson on Sec. 2. The name Eagle 
changed to Bethel in 1857. The name change 
probably reflected the desire of the inhabitants to 
be known as a settled Christian community 
rather than a place of wildness. However, the 
name "Eagle," persisted in the name of the 
neighborhood, the school and the church. 

See entries under "Eagle." 

BIG CREEK 

See Baptist Creek. 

BIRD or BIRDS SCHOOL 
(No. 2, Bushncll Tnp.; No. 9) 

Located originally on the SW comer of 
the NW quarter where it is shown on the 1861 
map, this school was subsequently moved to the 
SW comer of Sec. 29 where it appears on all 
later county maps. The name derives from Isaak 
Bird who homesteaded nearby. On the 1919 
map it is called "Birds" School. 

The school ceased operation in 1947 
when it was consolidated with Maple Grove 
School. The grounds were sold in 1950 (Deeds: 
206/332; Adair W. B., 2/9/1950). 

BLACK SCHOOL 

(No. 9, Industry Tnp.; No. 148) 

According to the 1885 history this 
school was built in 1867 on the SE comer of 
Sec. 30, (1885 History, 745). However, the 
1871, 1893 and 1913 county atlases show it one 
half mile west, on the SE comer of the SW 
quarter oi' Sec. 30. This site is confirmed by the 
1866 land deed from Robert L. Dark (Deeds: 
21/515). The 1919 and later maps show the 
school on the SW comer of the SE quarter but 
no deeds could be located to confirm this 
location. The building was sold in 1950 (.Xd.ur 
W. B.. 12/21/1950). 

The name derives from William H. 
Hhick and Henry i^lack wht> settled on lands 
adjacent to the school sites in 1840 1 he school 
was al\\a\s known as Black 

Sec also Black's Gra\c\aril. 



BLACK VVAYLAND CEMETERY 

See Bowlin-Wayland Graves. 

BLACKBURN SCHOOL 

See Harmony School (Chalmers Twp.). 

BLACKHAWK TRAIL 

This was the name of an early 
automobile route across the north part of the 
county. The route went from EUisville in Fulton 
County through Prairie City to Walnut Grove. 

The name is after the famous chief of 
the Fox and Sauk Indians who in 1832 valiantly, 
but unsuccessfully, fought against white 
takeover of the Illinois country. Numerous early 
automotive routes had Indian names. 

BLACK'S GRAVEYARD 

This is a family burial ground not shown 
on any map but knov\n to be located on land 
owned by the Black family in the NW quarter of 
Sec. 3 1 and the SW quarter of the SW quarter of 
Sec. 30 in Industry Twp. The 1919 map shows a 
church building on the south side of Sec. 30, just 
V2 mile west of the Black School. The church 
building and the cemetery were probably related 
bLit no information could be located about the 
church. 

BLACKSTONE SCHOOL 

See Yocum School. 

BLANDINSVILLE 

Located on the SE quarter of Sec. 32 in 
Blandinsville Twp., this town was laid out by 
Joseph L. Blandin on March 16, 1842 (Deeds: 
K/400). Prior to the platting of the town, the 
neighborhood was known as Job's Settlement. 
According to local sources, the name changed 
around 1838 (Souvenir. 5), but this could not be 
verified. In the 1920s Blandinsville acquired the 
epithet "Glade City." 

See also Job's Settlement and Glade 
City. 

BLANDINSVILLE CEMETERY 

See Glade City Cemetery. 



BLANDINSVILLE POST OFFIC E 

fhis post office was established Jiuic 23, 
1843. The first postmaster was Charles R. 
Hume. 

BLANDINSVILLE SEMINARY 

This was the school of the United 
Brethren Church of Blandinsville. The church 
was formed in 1846, and in 1852 it established 
the seminary in town. The seminary operated 
from 1 855 to 1 868, after which time the building 
was moved from its original site, east of the 
Main Street Elevator, to the school block and 
used as a public school. It was demolished in 
1905 (Calvert). 

BLANDINSVILLE TOWNSHIP 

This is Congressional Township 7 
North, 4West of the 4* Principal Meridian. The 
township took its name from the town of 
Blandins\ille in 1857 when all townships 
acquired proper names. It was first settled by 
William and Iraby Job in 1827 (Clarke, 637). 

BLA7IER or BLAZER SCHOOL 
(No. 2, Industry Twp.; No. 142) 

This school was built in 1858 (1885 
History, 742) on the NW comer of Sec. 8, on 
land donated in 1860 by John Blazer and Daniel 
Munson (Deeds; 21/288). The school is well 
marked on all maps. In the 1930s and the 1940s 
the name was spelled "Blazier." The building 
was sold in 1950 (Adair W. B., 12/21/1950) and 
the grounds in 1951 (Deeds: 206/324). 

BLOOMFIELD 

This name appears first on Colton's map 
of 1839, then on Chapman's map of 1857, on 
several maps in the 1860"s, and even on the 
Worthen map of 1875. The location, apparently 
at that time considered a settlement, was on the 
NE quarter of Sec. 16 in Scotland Twp. There is 
no local present-day knowledge of this name, 
nor could any official records be located. It was 
probably one of several speculative towns in the 
county. But it is curious that it was shown on 
ditterent maps o\er a period of almost forty 
years. 

See also Center Point School. 



THE BLUFFS 

This is a picturesque spot on the East 
Fork La Moine River just north of the Western 
Illinois State Normal School, now Western 
Illinois University. It was favored for local 
outings in the early 20"' Century. 

BONHAM'S MILL 

See Hummer's Mill. 

BOWLIN - WAYLAND GRAVES 

Located on land originally settled by 
Wesley Wayland in 1832, the graves are on the 
NE quarter of Sec. 34 in Chalmers Twp., on the 
south side of present Charlotte Road. The three 
gravestones are those of Wesley Wayland, his 
wife, and a young woman by the name of 
Bowlin. They are clearly visible but not marked 
on any map. 

It is said that there is an additional grave 
of a black woman, a family serxant by the name 
of Celea, to whom Wayland gave freedom in 
1836 (Commissioners: A/284). The 1860 
Census lists "Celea" in the Wayland household 
as 70 years old, but it is not known when she 
died and where she was buried. 

According to Lester (Cemeteries; 5/28), 
the cemetery was once known as Riden 
Cemetery, but there is no record that any 
member of the Riden family is buried here. 
David Riden owned property on Sec. 33 in 
Chalmers Twp. The cemetery is today also 
called Black Wayland Cemetery. 

BOWMAN CEMETERY 

Located on the NW quarter of Sec. 28 in 
Industry Twp., this site is not marked on maps 
and there are no visible grave markers. In 1893 
J. Bowman owned 15 acres of this quarter 
scctit)n. The cemetery is probably a private 
burial plot. According to local sources it was 
located just east of Clayton Cemetery (Cirimm, 
2002). 

BRATTLEVILLE POST OFFIC E 

"Bratllevillc" appears on all early maps 
of the county. It was "a post ottlce, in Carter's 
Selllement, on the mail road to Ruslu ille" (Peck. 
IM). Establisheil on .lanuary 1 |i.c M| 1833, 
Ihc |iosl oificc appears on llic 1838 .lones map. 



the 1839 Burr map, and the 1839 Colton map. 
Burr's map shows Brattleville on Sec. 13 of 
Industry Twp., probably on the Galena Trail. As 
the trail became less important and other 
settlements sprang up, the post office moved to 
Doddsville on February 25, 1837. 

The name comes from James W. Brattle, 
the tlrst postmaster and the first experienced 
land surveyor in the county. Although no 
evidence could be found that Brattle owned land 
in this neighborhood, he must have lived there, 
at least temporarily. 

See also Doddsville Post Office. 

BRICK YARD or BRICKYARD SCHOOL 
(No. 4, Emmet Twp.; No. 56) 

The first school building was probably 
built in 1863 when Francis R. Houghton deeded 
land to school trustees (Mortgages: Q/566). The 
school site, located on the SW comer of the NE 
quarter of Sec. 35, is shown on the 1871 and the 
1876 county maps. In 1881 that land was sold 
to J. T. Haggerty (Deeds: 47/233), and in the 
same year Albert Eads sold property to the 
school board on the SW comer of the NW 
quarter of Sec. 35, one half mile west of the 
original site (Deeds: 47 186). This latter site 
remained in use until 1948. The land was sold 
m 1949 (Deeds: 194 501). In the 1920s and 
1930s the school was known as the "Model 
country school," operated by Western Illinois 
State Teachers College as a demonstration 
facility for rural teaching. 

According to an article in the Macomb 
Daily .loumal . the school was first called "Hard 
Scrabble, because of its questionable reputation" 
(MDJ, 5/29/1909, p. 2), but later it became 
known as "Brickyard," the name used most 
often before it became the tramuig school. The 
name deri\ed from an unportanl brickyard on 
Sec. 34 in [-mmet fup., started by James M. 
Chase in 1869 just south of the original school 
site. The brickyard supplied bricks for the 
eonstruclion of the McDonougii County Court 
House in the 1870's(1885 History, 693). 

For the explanation of the name "Hard 
Scrabble" see Hard Scrabble School 
(Hlandins\ ilie fwp.). 



10 



BRISTOVV'S CREEK 

This name appears only onee in tlie 
1836 proceedings of the County Commissioners 
Court (Commissioners: A/317). It seems that it 
was used for La Harpe Creek, and named for Eli 
Bristow, an early settler in Blandinsville Twp. 
and an influential resident of the Muddy Lane 
neighborhood. 

See also Muddy Lane. 

BROCK SCHOOL 

(No. 6, Bushnell Twp.; No.6) 

This school started as No. 7 Union 
District of Bushnell Twp. and Lee Twp. in 
Fulton County. It was located on the NE comer 
of Sec. 23 as shown on the 186! map. The deed 
for the school grounds was issued in 1869 
(Deeds: 28/213). In 1871 the school is shown 
on the SE comer of Sec. 13 and in 1876 Clarke 
calls it "District No. 6" and places it on the NE 
comer of Sec. 24. All later maps show the 
school on the NE comer of Sec. 23. The name 
comes from the Brock family which m 1893 
owned land west and southwest from the school 
site. The school closed in 1947, when it united 
with the Prairie City School District. 

See also Union Districts (Bushnell and 
Prairie City townships). 

BRONSON CREEK 

This creek originates in Harmony Twp., 
Hancock County and joins the La Moine River 
in Sec. 1 8 of Lamoine Twp. The name derives 
from Thomas Bronson, the flrst white settler 
upon its banks (Young, 15). On the Robinson 
map of 1 838 the creek is shown as "Bells C." 

BROOKING CEMETERY 

According to neighborhood sources, this 
burial plot was located on the SE quarter of Sec. 
7 in Macomb Twp. There are no gravestones 
and the cemetery has never been identified on 
maps. The site was on the Brookmg family 
land, but members of the family are buried in 
Macomb's Oakwood Cemetery. The burial 
ground on Sec. 7 was at one time adjacent to the 
McDonough County Poor Farm. The plot 
probably contains graves of county paupers. 

See also County Farm. 



BROWN or BROWNS SCHOOI, 
(No. 1,7, Industry Twp.; No. 140) 

This school was built in 1856 on the 
NW corner of Sec. 12, on land donated by J. M. 
Vail (1885 History, 745). The 1859 school 
district maps show this location to be District 1, 
but in 1860 the district was subdivided into 
districts 1, 6 and 7. Clarke calls it District 7 
(Clarke. 422). The school is shown on maps 
from 1871 to 1940, but no deeds could be 
located. It was probably named for Jesse 
Brown, one of the first three directors. The 
school building sold in 1950 (Adair W. B., 
12/21/1950). 

On the 1919 map this school is marked 
"Browns." 

BROWNS SCHOOL (Walnut Grove Twp.) 

See Hiawatha School. 

BRUCE POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on May 
10. 1854 and discontinued on March 24. 1868 
when the Mississippi and Wabash Valley 
Railroad was built and the Amicus Post Office 
in Sciota was established. Bruce P.O. was 
located on the MaccMnb-Burlington stagecoach 
road, about two miles southwest from the Spring 
Creek P. O. John S. Wilson, the first post 
master, lived on the NW quarter of Section 7 in 
Emmet Twp. In 1857 John D. Hainline became 
the post master. The new location shown on the 
1861 map as "Spring Creek Post Office" was on 
the east side of the SE quarter of Sec. 6. In 1865 
the post master was John W. Siders, on the NE 
quarter of See. 7 (Site). The 1875 map and also 
the 1879 School Map of the State of Illinois 
locate "Bruce" on the north half of the SE 
quarter of Sec. 6 in Emmet Twp., which was the 
residence of John D. Hainline, but by that time 
the post office was long gone. 

The origin of the name "Bruce" is 
unclear. David L. Bruce, an early landowner in 
Sec. 15 of Emmet Twp., and J.S. Bruce who 
lived on the NE quarter of Section 14 in Sciota 
Twp. are unlikely candidates. The name might 
have honored a prominent Scottish family two of 
whose members occupieil the Scottish throne. 

See also Spring Creek Pt)st Office. 



11 



BRUNDAGE CEMETERY 

See Pioneer Cemetery. 

BRUSH CREEK 

See Town Fork. 

BUCK BRIDGE 

This was a bridge over the Drowning 
Fork on the road between Sec. 28 and Sec. 21 in 
Bushneii Twp. The bridge was mentioned in the 
Macomb Journal (5/15/1903, p.2). It was 
probably named for Joseph Buck, who according 
to the 1880 census, lived in Bushneii Twp. 

BUENA VISTA SCHOOL HOUSE 

See Pleasant View School (Hire Twp.). 

BUNCOMBE CHURCH 

This church is shown only in the 1893 
county atlas. It was located on the NW comer of 
Sec. 36 in Lamoine Twp., on land owned by 
John Scott. The church was a splinter off the 
Scott's Church on Sec. 30 in Bethel Twp. It 
existed only until 1904 when John Scott sold his 
land and moved to Oklahoma (Peter, 104). 

For an explanation of the name see 
Buncombe School. 

BUNCOMBE SCHOOL 

(No. 5, Lamoine Twp., No. 126) 

This school was located in the middle of 
the NW quarter in Sec. 36. According to Clarke 
"A log school house was built some time 
previous to the year 1841" (Clarke, 662), and is 
shown in 1856 (RSR, 155) and the 1861 map. 
Frame structures were built in 1858 and 1880 
(1885 History, 662). Jacob Bugher donated land 
in 1858 for "as long as the same is occupied for 
school purposes" (Mortgages: R/434). The 
school is shown as late as 1940, but no closing 
deed could be located. 

The name could have several origins. 
Buncombe was a general in the Army, but it is 
also the name of a county in North Carolina, and 
of a settlement in Johnson County, Illinois, eight 
miles northwest from Vienna. Hunconibe is also 
a variant of "bunkum," or meaningless political 
talk. I'he word derives from "the speech for 
Huiicombe" by U.S. Senator lelix Walker, 
ticluered around 1820 uliich icreiieti to 



Buncombe County, N.C. The most plausible 
explanation is that the name was given for the 
county in North Carolina. The prominent 
Kennedy family in this neighborhood was from 
North Carolina. 

BURLINGTON ROAD 

This was an important stage-coach road 
from Beardstown on the Illinois River to 
Burlington, Iowa by way of Rushville and 
Macomb laid out in 1830 (Commissioners: Ay9). 
Because this was a state road, it required 
frequent repairs and relocations, many of which 
were recorded and mapped in official county 
records. 

BURLINGTON-NORTHERN RAILROAD 

This railroad was first conceived as 
Northern Cross R.R. and was to be built in the 
1 840s connecting Chicago to Quincy. The 
construction was delayed due to lack of funds. 
The 1850s saw another opportunity to locate a 
railroad line through the county. After much 
discussion, political confrontation, and with a 
substantial financial obligation by McDonough 
County citizens, the rails were laid in 1856. The 
result was an immediate and great increase in 
county population. The railroad also spurred the 
establishment of numerous towns along its 
route. The streets of these towns were laid out 
parallel or at right angle to the rail lines. This 
sets them apart from older towns, which were 
oriented north-south and east-v\est. The 
Chicago Burlington & Quincy Line was 
ultimately acquired by the Burlington-Northern 
Railroad. 

BURNSIDE SCHOOL 

Sec Burns\ ille School. 

BURNS VI LLE P.O. 

Established May 14, 1847 and 
discontinued July 9, 1867, this post office was 
shown on Colton's map of Illinois for 1855. and 
1868, and on the 18(ii ciuint\ map. I he 
geological map of the State ot Illinois for 1875 
spells the name as '"Brunsville," but that was an 
obvious mistake. All maps show the post office 
on the S\V corner of the NW quarter of Sec. 7 in 
Walnut (iro\e Twp Ihe first postmaster was 



12 



Ebenezer Bishop who in 1841 settled on the 
west side of See. 7. Ebenezer and his wife were 
both native Seots, with Mrs. Bishop born in the 
Parish of Whitebiim (Harris, M.). 

The Bishops might have named their 
neighborhood "Bumsville," a variant of 
Whitebiim, but the name eoiild have honored 
Robert Bums, the popular Seottish poet of the 
19" Century, or it could have deri\ed from 
"burn," which in Scottish means brook, referring 
to the Little Creek near which the original 
school site was located. 

See also Bumsville School. 

BURNS VI LLE SCHOOL 
(No. l,SciotaTvvp.; No. 20) 

Known also as "Bumside," this school 
was established in 1871 when School District 
No. 5 split into districts 1 and 6. The building of 
District No. 5, which stood on the SE comer of 
Sec. 1 1 and is shown in this location on the 1861 
map and m the 1871 atlas, was moved to the NE 
corner of Sec. 1 1 onto land deeded by David 
Robbins in 1872 (Deeds: 35/183). It is shown 
here on all county maps starting with 1893. It 
consolidated with the Blandinsville-Seiota 
District No. 175 in 1946 and the grounds sold m 
1960 (Deeds: 230/411). 

BUSH CREEK 

A creek by this name is not shown on 
any map, but is mentioned in the proceedings of 
the County Commissioners Court in 1857 as 
being located in Walnut Grove Twp. 
(Commissioners: D/78). The name is probably a 
misspelled entry for Brush Creek, now known as 
Town Fork. 

See Town Fork. 

BUSHNELL 

Located on the NE quarter of Sec. 33 in 
Bushnell Twp., this town was laid out on August 
29, 1854 by John D. Hail, David P. Wells and 
Iverson L. Twyman in conjunction with the 
building of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 
R.R. (Deeds: V/4-5). "At first the location was 
known as 'West Prairie,' there being few 
wooded tracts in the area" (Drury, 4). 



The town was named in honor of 1. 
Nehemiah Bushnell. the president of the 
Northern Cross Rail Road. 

BUSHNELL ARM OF THE GER^L\N 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

See liusiinell Church. 

BUSHNELL CEMETERY 

This cemetery started with an 1855 deed 
from William Dickhut for part of the SW quarter 
of the SE quarter of Sec. 33 in Bushnell Twp. 
(Deeds: 2/63). 

BUSHNELL CHURCH 

"Bushnell Church," was the Bushnell 
Arm of the German Baptist Church. The 
congregation organized in 1865 in the Crowl 
School on the SE comer of Sec. 2 in Mound 
Twp. where it met until 1879. It then split into 
the northem division, called Spring Run Church, 
and the southern division known as Camp Creek 
Church. 

See also Spring Run German Baptist 
Church and Camp Creek Church. 

BUSHNELL POST OFFICE 

This post office is the successor to the 
Drowning Fork Post Office. It was established 
on March 13, 1858. The first postmaster was 
Joseph Crawford. 

See also Drowning Fork Post Office. 

BUSHNELL TOWNSHIP 

Bushnell Township, named after the 
town of Bushnell, started as a regular 
Congressional Township 7North, 1 West from 
the 4" Principal Meridian. In June 1866 upon 
petition from \'oters in present Prairie City Twp., 
it was divided into Prairie City Township, with 
sections 1-18, and Bushnell Township, with 
sections 19-36 (Minutes: E/116). The first 
settler in Bushnell Tv\p. was Matthew B. 
Robinson who settled on Sec. 30 in 1836. The 
township was sparsely populated until the rail 
line was built in 1 856. 



13 



c 



C. B. & Q. RAILROAD 

See Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 
Railroad. 

CALLAHAN SCHOOL 

A school by this name is mentioned in 
the Macomb Daily Journal in 1903, but no other 
information is given. This might have been an 
alternate name for Hickory Grove School 
located near the center of Sec. 22 in Emmet 
Twp. Michael and John Callahan owned land in 
the NE quarter of Sec. 27 in 1893 and 1913. 

CALVIN CEMETERY 

See Vawler Cemetery. 

CAMP CREEK 

This creek is a major tributary of the La 
Moine River. It runs through New Salem, 
Scotland, Industry, and Bethel townships in a 
generally southwest direction and joins the La 
Moine River in Birmingham Twp., Schuyler 
County. According to the 1885 history of the 
county, the creek was named for William 
Osbom(e) who camped on its banks during the 
summer of 1828, "on what is now the fami of 
Theophilus Walker" (1885 History. 712). and is 
the SE quarter of Section 26 in Scotland Twp. 
(Walker). Another explanation for the name 
comes from the many deserted Indian camps at 
the head of the creek found by the earliest 
settlers (Powers. 33-34). William T. Brooking 
also mentions the existence of a deserted Indian 
campground in the vicinity of Camp Creek in 
1834 (Rezab, 10). Prior to the name "Camp" the 
creek was called Rodgers Creek in 1831 
(Commissioners; A/27) and "Camp or Turkey" 
in 1833 and 1836(Commissioners: A/ 153, 299). 
The name "Turkey" also appears in Peck's 
Gazetteer . Under the entry "Roger's Creek" 
Peck states; "called also Turkey Fork, a branch 
ofCrooked Creek" (Peck. 284). 



CAMP CREEK (settlement) 

Camp Creek was also the name of one 
of the early population clusters in McDonough 
County. The location of the neighborhood was 
south of the creek in Scotland and Industry 
townships, as evidenced by the location of the 
cemetery, the original church site, and the 
school. 

See also Rogers Settlement. 

CAMP CREEK CEMETERY 

This cemetery is one of the major rural 
cemeteries in the county still in use. It is located 
on the SW comer of the SE quarter of Sec. 32 in 
Scotland Twp.. and the adjacent NE quarter of 
Sec. 5, in Industn. Twp. It is well marked on all 
county maps. The earliest burials date from 
1837, but the cemetery does not show on maps 
until 1893. The first deed for the site is Joseph 
McCroskey's 1846 land sale to trustees of the 
Camp Creek Old School Presbyterian Church 
(Deeds; L/80). The deed mentions the existence 
of a frame church. In 1888 James Kinkade 
deeded land to trustees of a "burying ground 
known as Camp Creek Cemeterv." The land 
was located in the NE quarter of Sec. 5 in 
Industry Twp. and was to be used "for hitching 
purposes and none other" (Deeds; 53' 599). The 
1892 deed from William Eddington extended the 
grounds into the SE quarter of Section 32 in 
Scotland Twp. (Deeds; 71/423). Several 
additional purchases in the 1900s added land in 
both Scotland and Industn.' townships. 

CAMP CREEK CHURCH 

fhis was one of two Dunkard or 
German Baptist Brethren congregations in the 
county. The other was Spring Run German 
Baptist Church located in Mound Twp. 
(Cemeteries, 3 32). The church was organized 
m 1880 (1976 History. 14) when the Bushnell 
Arm of the Cierman Baptist Church split into 
Spring Creek and Camp Creek churches. The 
church. commonU known as Camp Creek, but 
most recently called Church of the Brethren, was 
located jusl east of the Dunkard Cemetery, in the 
SW quarter of Section 18 in Bethel Iwp Ihc 
congregation was acti\e until 1967. 

See also Dunkard CemeteiA'. 



14 



CAMP CREEK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Although a community church existed in 
the neighborhood already in 1834, this cluirch 
was formally established in 1839 as part of the 
Rushville Presbytery. The congregation built its 
house of worship in 1843, on land deeded in 
1846 by Joseph McCroskey, on the SE quarter 
of Sec. 33 in Scotland Twp. The deed states that 
a frame church already existed on the site 
(Deeds: L/80). In 1861 a schism in the 
membership resulted in an eastern and a western 
faction. The eastern group built a new Camp 
Creek Church one mile northeast of the original 
site, on the SW quarter of Sec. 27 in Scotland 
Twp. on land deeded by John Clark (Mortgages: 
N/453). The western congregation became 
known as the Ebenezer Church. 

A new Camp Creek sanctuary was built 
in 1898 in yet another location, the SE comer of 
Sec. 16 in Scotland Twp. on land donated in 
1898 by William B. Simpson, and located just 
west of the school grounds (Deeds: 79/403). 
This sanctuary stood until 1991 when it burned 
to the ground. It was rebuilt in 1993 as Scotland 
Trinity Presbyterian Church. 

In the early 20" Century the church was 
frequently called Center Point Church because 
of its central location in the township, and 
proximity to the Center Point School (MDJ, 
3/1/1910, p.5) 

See also Ebenezer Presbyterian Church, 
Scotland Trinity Presbyterian Church, and Camp 
Creek School. 

CAMP CREEK SCHOOL 

(No. 8. Scotland Twp.; No. 97) 

William T. Brooking mentioned in his 
memoir that in 1834 his family lived on Camp 
Creek in the schoolhouse, which was built of 
logs and also served as church and Sunday 
school (Rezab, 10). The 1861 map shows a 
school in the neighborhood on the west side of 
the SE quarter of Sec. 27, but no deeds could be 
located to verify its startmg date. In 1871 a 
school is shown on the NE comer of Sec. 33, 
just southwest from the church, although the 
land deed for the lot dates back to 1861 
(Mortgages: 0/346). John Baumgardener 
deeded additional land on the NE corner of the 
same NE quarter in 1913 (Deeds: 117/629). 



Camp Creek consolidated uito the 
Scotland School District No. 94 ui March of 
1947 and the grounds were sold in 1950 as 
■"unnecessary for the use of School District No. 
165" (Deeds: 206/311). 

CAMP DITCH 

This intemuttent stream is located in 
Lamoine Twp. It tlows in the southwesterly 
direction through sections 25, 26 and 34 where it 
empties into the La Moine River. The creek is 
named only in the 1913 atlas of the county. 

CAMP FORK 

This is the name given by Peck's 
Gazetteer to the North Fork of the East Fork La 
Moine River (Peck, 171.219). The 1844 Morse 
map repeats the name. Both were obviously 
wrong. The name exemplifies the confusion 
about the hierarchy of the streams in the county 
during the early years of settlement. 

See also Hickory Grove and Downing 
Fork. 

CAMP JACKSON 

See Jackson Park. 

CAMP MEETING ASSOCIATION 

See Spring Creek Camp. 

CAMP PEARL 

See Jackson Park. 

CANE PATCH SCHOOL 

(No. 11, BlancJinsviiJcTwp.; No. 31) 

Accorduig to Clarke the building of 
■'District No. 1 1" was moved to the SE corner of 
Section 4 in 1864 (Clarke, 434), and is shown in 
this location in the 1871 county atlas. The 1893 
atlas shows a school on the SW corner of Sec. 3 
where it remained until its consolidation into the 
Northwest District in the late 1940s. No deeds 
could be located. The school was sold by 
trustees in 1950 (Adair W. B., 2/2/1950). 

The name of the school might imply a 
location next to a growth of reeds in a prairie 
depression located nearby or a field of sorghum, 
a common crop during the early settlement. 



15 



CANNONBALL TRAIL 

This road, built for the gasoline- 
powered vehicles, was part of an effort to 
upgrade major roads through the country. The 
road connected Chicago with Denver via Kansas 
City. In Illinois, Cannonball Route connected 
Chicago with Quincy. It followed present U. S. 
Highway 34 from Chicago to Galesburg. From 
there, the road went by way of Avon, Prairie 
City, Bushnell, Macomb, Colchester, Tennessee. 
Colmar, Plymouth, Bowen and Golden to 
Quincy. It was the most important of the four 
automobile trails through the county. The name 
replaced the older name "Waubonsie." 
"Cannonball" appears on official road maps of 
Illinois from 1917 on, but by 1926 specific 
names were dropped and roads were designated 
by numbers. 

Trail names were represented by signs 
on telephone poles at intersections. The 
cannonball sign consisted of a white background 
with black stripes on top and bottom and in the 
middle a black circle with a white letter "C." 

See also Abe Lincoln Trail, Mississippi 
Valley Highway, National White Way, and 
Waubonsie Trail. 

CARMACK MILL 

See Pleasant Valley Mill. 

CARSON SCHOOL 

(No. 2, Tennessee Twp.; No. 1 16) 

This school was first located on the NW 
corner of Sec. 26 where it is shown on the 1861 
map. The land was donated in 1847 by Samuel 
A. White (Deeds: L/305). In 1919 this parcel 
passed into private hands (Deeds; 125/60). In 
1871 the school appears on the SW quarter of 
Sec. 26 on land sold in 1869 by William 
Mourning (Deeds: 28/29). Maps of 1893 and 
1913 also show it in this location. The school 
closed m 1946. 

'! he name is for the Carson lannly, who 
were neighboring landowners. 

CAR ILR C REKK 

This creek ongniatcs in Sec. 17 ol 
j-lilorailo iwp. aiul Hows west to join liic 
Cirindstoiie Creek in Sec. 20 of Industry I up 
The creek is nametl for William Carter, one of 



the first settlers in Industry Twp. An 1851 road 
map calls Carter Creek "North Branch 
Grindstone" (RSR, 72). 

See also Carter's Settlement. 

CARTER'S SETTLEMENT 

Located about one and one half mile 
southeast of Industry, in and around Sec. 26 of 
Industry Twp., Carter's Settlement was named 
for William Carter, one of two early settlers in 
this location in 1826. Carter lived here several 
years and then moved to Missouri, but many of 
the earliest settlers used Carter's Settlement as 
the jumping-off point for homesteading the 
northern townships of the county. Carter's 
Settlement is considered the oldest settlement in 
the county and the site of the "Old Fort." 

See also Crossroads and Old Fort. 

CATHOLIC CEMETERY (Tennessee Twp ) 

This cemetery, also called Old Roman 
Catholic Cemetery and Sacred Heart Cemeter>'. 
is located on the NW comer of Sec. 15 in 
Tennessee Twp., on the east side of the old stage 
coach road from Tennessee to Blandinsville, and 
one mile northwest from the Sacred Heart 
Church in Tennessee. It was established in mid 
1850s together with St. Mary's Parish in 
Tennessee, but the land deed from Joseph Riley 
was executed only in 1865 (Deeds: 14/462). The 
cemetery does not appear on the 1861 nor the 
1871 map, but all later maps show the site. 

This cemetery is the final resting place 
for many of the county's early Irish settlers. It 
should not be confused with the Old Catholic 
Cemetery, which was the first cemetery ol' 
Macomb's St. Paul Church. 

Sec also Sacred Heart Church. 

CEDAR CREEK 

Cedar Creek originates in Sec. 23 of 
Hire Twp. and fiows in a southwesterly direction 
to join the la Moine Rner in Sec. 18 of 
Hancock \\\\i. in Hancock County. Ihe earliest 
t>ccurrence of Ihe name is on the I 874 nKi|i ot 
Hancock County. 

ihe iiaiiic ma\ deri\c from cedar trees 
glowing along the banks, but may also allude to 
the Biblical cedars of I ebanon. indicating a 
godly place. 



16 



CEDAR CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 

Erected in 1872 on land deeded in IS71 
by E. Haines to the "Missionary Baptist Church" 
(Deeds: 30/368), this church was shown only in 
the 1893 and the 1913 atlases of the county, 
even though the congregation existed into the 
1930s (Harris, M.). It was located on the SW 
comer of the SE quarter of Sec. 22, in Hire 
Twp., although the 1885 history of the county 
incorrectly locates the church on Sec. 22 in 
Walnut Grove Twp. (1885 History, 469). The 
church might have started as Cedar Creek Bible 
Society, whose minutes of meetings date from 
Aug. 14, 1853 (Peter, 78). The names derive 
from Cedar Creek. 

CENTENNIAL METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

Organized in 1871, this congregation 
met in the Summit schoolhouse on the SW 
corner of Sec. 25 in New Salem Twp. until 1876 
when a church was built (1885 History, 461). 
Clarke locates this church on the NW comer of 
Sec. 36 in New Salem Twp. (Clarke, 549), but 
the 1 893 atlas of the county shows it on the SW 
corner of the SE quarter of Sec. 36. No deeds 
could be located to verify either location. 
The church ceased to function in 1897 
(MDJ, 11/1 1/1897, p. 3) 

The church was probably named for the 
hundredth anniversary of the American 
Revolution. 

CENTENNIAL SCHOOL 

(No. 9, Tennessee Twp.; No. 1 13) 

Located on the south side of the NW 
quarter of Sec. 18, this school was probably built 
in 1876, or 1877 when Philip Cuba sold land to 
school trustees (Deeds: 82/608). Clarke 
mentions it by name in 1878, and it appears on 
the 1893 and later maps of the county. The 
school closed in 1946. 

CENTER BRANCH CROOKED CREEK 

See La Moine River. 



CENTER CHURCH or CENTER UNITED 
BRETHREN CHURC H or CENTRE 
CHAPEL 

This congregation started in 1863 as 
Deer Park Mission and met at Center and Lynn 
schools (Peter, 234-235). The sanctuary was 
built in 1876 on the SH comer of Sec. 16 in 
Walnut Grove Twp. (Clarke, 581) on land 
deeded by George B. Hastings to the "Walnut 
Grove Township Church of United Brethren in 
Christ" (Deeds: 40/442). Over the years the 
church was called Center Church (Woods, 44), 
Centre Chapel, and Center United Methodist 
Church (Harris, M). It folded in the early 197()s. 
Church trustees transferred ownership to private 
hands in 1974 (Deeds: 287/449). 

CENTER POINT CHURCH 

This was an informal name for the 
Camp Creek Presbyterian Church, because of its 
proximity to the Center Pitint School (Sticklen). 

CENTER POINT SCHOOL 

(No. 5, Scotland Twp.; No. 94) 

In 1879 Samuel C. Knight donated land 
to school trustees on the SE comer of Sec. 16 
(Deeds: 47/56), and this school location appears 
on all county maps starting in 1861 except for 
1940, when the school is shown across the 
section line on the SW corner of Sec. 15. The 
early histories of the county call it "Center 
School." In 1947 the school building became 
Scotland District No. 94. The grounds were sold 
off in 1952 (Deeds: 206/497). 

See also Bloomfield and Pleasant Ridge 
schools. 

CENTER RIDGE 

See Gin Ridge. 

CENTER SCHOOL 

(No. 4, Biandins^ illc Twp.; No. 34) 

Located on the NE comer of Sec. 21, 
this school was built in 1858 (Clarke, 433) and 
is shown on all county maps starting in 1861. It 
consolidated into the Blandinsville-Sciota 
District No. 1 75 in 1946 and the grounds were to 
be sold in 1949 (Adair W.B., 2/10/1949). No 
deeds could be located. 



17 



CENTER SCHOOL 

(No. 5, Sciota Twp.; No. 24) 

The earliest record of this school is an 
1852 deed from A.B. Head granting land to 
school trustees in the NW quarter of Sec. 16 
(Deeds: C/26). In 1856 a school is shown on the 
NW comer of the NE quarter of Sec. 1 5 (RSR, 
146). In 1858 reorganization of school districts 
resulted in a school built on the NW comer of 
Sec. 22 (Clarke, 430), where it was shown only 
on the 1871 map. A land deed in 1879 locates 
the school on the SW comer of Sec. 15 (Deeds; 
46/18), and this remains the school site until 
consolidation into the Sciota School District in 
1947. The school building bumed in 1895 
(M.DJ, 12/7/1895, p. 5) but was rebuilt on the 
same site. 

This school was also known as "Logan 
School." .lohn Logan resided just west of the 
school site from 1861 to 1893. 

CENTER SCHOOL (Scotland Twp.) 
See Center Point School. 

CENTER SCHOOL 

(No. 5, Walnut Grove Twp.; No. 14) 

This school was built in 1863 on land 
donated in 1 862 by .lames Reed and located on 
the SW corner of Section 15 in 1862 (Deeds: 
18/528). County maps show a school building 
in this location from 1871 on. In the early years 
of its existence the school served as a place of 
worship for the Deer Park Mission. It 
consolidated into the Sciota School District No. 
28 in April of 1947. In 1959 the land reverted to 
private ownership (Deeds: 230/105). This school 
was always known as "Center" or "Centre 
School." 

See also Center Church. 

CENTRAL CEMETERY OR GRAVEYARD 

This cemetery is located east of the SW 
comer ol the NW quarter of Sec. 19 in Hire 
Twp., on land owned by George Hainline, It was 
the ccmclcry of the Central Christian Church, 
located southwest ol'tiic cemetery. The cemetery 
is also known as Rock Creek. The earliest 
burials date from the lS9()s. This township 
cemetery is first shown on the 1893 map and is 
still ill use. 



CENTRAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

This church was located on the east side 
of the SW quarter of Sec. 19 in Hire Twp., just 
southwest and across the road from Central 
Cemetery, on land deeded by William H. 
Grigsby in 1888 (Deeds: 63/92). The church was 
shown in this location in 1893, 1913, and 1919. 
The congregation ceased to exist in the 1920s. 
The building was demolished in 1950 (Hainline, 
L.), and the land sold the same year 
(Deeds: 207/141). 

It is not known why the church and the 
cemetery are called "Central" except to indicate 
their central location in the Rock Creek 
neighborhood. 

CENTRE BRANCH 

This was the name for the East Fork La 
Moine River below the mouth of the North Fork. 
It is clearly marked on the 1861 map and is the 
only occurrence of that name. 

See also Drowning Fork and La Moine 
River. 

CENTRE CHAPEL 

See Center Church. 

CENTRE SCHOOL 

See Center School (Walnut Grove Twp.) 

CHALMERS TOWNSHIP 

This township was originally a full 
Congressional Township 5North, 3West from 
the 4"' Principal Meridian, but in 1880 sections 
on its west side became part of Colchester 
Township. The early name of the township was 
Frin. the ancient name tor Ireland, probably to 
honor the Irish origin of its many early settlers, 
or, possibly, the Irish fight for independence 
from Britain. In 1857 the name changed to 
Chalmers. 

The choice oi the name "Chalmers" is 
unclear, unless it was related to the town o\' 
Chalmers in White County. Indiana. Both .lames 
and William I'dmonston. earh settlers in the 
tinsiiship. came from Indiana. "Chalmers" is the 
Scottish t'onn of "chambers" aiul is also used as 
a surname. 

See also Colchester l'ownshi|v 



18 



CHALMERS TOWNSHIP TOWN HALL 

This building was shown on tlic 1^)13 
and the 1920 map. It was located adjacent to 
Salem Evangelical Church on land deeded by 
Robert Saffell in 1896 "tor the purpose of a 
town hall" (Deeds: 80/92). From 1935 to 1975 
the town hall was located in the vacated 
sanctuary of the church. 

CHAPEL CEMETERY 

See Wesley Chapel Cemetery. 

CHERRY GROVE SCHOOL 

(No. 3, Tennessee Twp.; No. Ill) 

This school was located on the south 
section line of the SW quarter of Sec. 3 in 
Tennessee Twp. It is shown on all maps starting 
with 1861. Clarke locates this school on Sec. 
10. (Clarke, 431), but no land deeds could be 
found for either location. 

The name may have derived from a 
cultivated cherry orchard, or wild black cherry 
trees which commonly grew along wood 
margins. 

CHESTER 

A town plat by this name was filed Sep. 
20, 1836 by N.F. Hays, W. Hathaway, 
C.C. Chandler, and S.B. Kyle. The plat was 
located on the SW quarter of the NW quarter of 
Sec. 2 in Hire Twp. (Mortgages: A/99-100). In 
1837 the county levied ta.xes on the town lots 
(Commissioners: A/325). The site did not 
developed into a town, probably because of 
strong competition from the already-established 
Job's Settlement, later Blandinsville, located a 
short distance to the west. Nevertheless, a 
neighborhood by that name existed as a distinct 
location ( 1 885 History, 68 1 ). 

The reason for the naming is unknown 
unless it is to honor the town and county in 
England, which was the origin of many settlers 
brought to America by William Penn. It is a 
common place name, with approximately thirty 
such locations in the U.S. 

In later years Chester was sometimes 
used as an affectionate name for Colchester 
(MDJ, 11/16/1929). 

See also Colchester. 



CHICAGO, BURLINGTON & QUINCY 
RAILROAD 

See Burlington-Northern Railroad. 

CHICKAMAIIGA STOCK FARM 

Located on the east half of Sec. 24 of 
Emmet Twp., this horse-breeding farm 
belonging to A.V. Brooking was one of several 
such operations in the county around the turn of 
the century. The name comes from a locally- 
famous racing and stud horse, so-named after 
the Civil War battle in which he was first ridden 
by Colonel Louis H. Waters of Macomb 
(Hallwas, 1984.95-96). 

CHOCKLEY CEMETERY 

Located in the center of the SE quarter 
of Sec. 29 in Eldorado Twp., this is a county 
cemetery still in use. It was established in 
conjunction with the Salem Meeting House of 
the United Brethren in Christ Church. A gift of 
land in 1857 from three Chockley families 
named the congregation as the grantee (Deeds: 
3/206). By 1910 S.E. Beghtol donated additional 
land to McDonough County (Deeds: 110/490). 
The cemetery is shown on maps starting in 1 893, 
but the earliest burials date from the 1 840s. The 
cemetery is named for the Chockley family. 

See also Salem Meeting House of the 
United Brethren in Christ Church. 

CHOCKLEY SCHOOL 

(No. 9, Eldorado Twp.; No. 158) 

The 1871 atlas shows this school on the 
SW comer of Sec. 29, where it also appears on 
the 1876 atlas, but the 1873 deed from Jacob 
Lawyer places it on the NE comer of Sec. 31 
(Deeds: 34/527). The deed in 1888 from Fielden 
Beghtol (Deeds: 64/46) is for the NW corner of 
Sec. 32 where the school shows on the 1893 
atlas. The 1919 and later maps place it on the 
NE corner of Sec. 31. It consolidated with the 
Eldorado School District No. 154 in March of 
1947. 

The name comes from the Chockley 
family who owned land in the vicinity. The 
1919 map labeled this school "Chalkey." 

See also Bethany Free Methodist 
Church 



19 



CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 

See Camp Creek Church. 

CHURCH OF THE UNITED BRETHREN 

IN CHRIST (Hire Twp.) 

See Elm Grove United Brethren Church. 

CHURCH OF THE UNITED BRETHREN 

IN CHRIST (Sciota Twp.) 

See Pleasant Gale United Brethren 
Church. 

CHURCH OF THE UNITED BRETHREN 
IN CHRIST (Scotland Twp.) 
See Union Chapel. 

CINCINNATI 

This is a wooded area in the NW quarter 
of Sec. 23 in Macomb Twp., so called because it 
was owned by a man from Cincinnati. The area 
was also known as "'Cincinnati Quarter" since it 
comprised a whole quarter section of land. 
(Harris, M.). 

See also Ferster Woods. 

CLARK - EVANS - WOODS CEMETERY 

This family burying ground is not 
shown on any map. It is located on the section 
line between eastern parts of sections 3 and 10 in 
New Salem Twp. (Grimm, 1987). The land on 
uhich the graves are located was owned in 1871 
by Alva Clark and in 1893 by Sarah Clark. Both 
are buried here as are members of the Woods 
family who settled in New Salem Twp. in 1831. 
The earliest intennent was in 1843. 

CLARKE SCHOOL 

An early school by this name is 
mentioned as having been located m Fmmet 
Twp. (Pioneers, 214). It was built in 1835 near 
Clarke's saw-mill (Clarke, 691), probably on the 
NE quarter of Sec. 5. This was the first school 
in the Spring Creek neighborhood and was the 
predecessor of Timber School. No land deeds 
could be found in onler to verify the location. 

See also 1 inihcr School. 



CLARKE'S SAWMILL 

This mill was built m 1854 (Holmes, 97) 
by brothers William B. and Samuel L. Clarke on 
the NE quarter of Sec. 5 of Emmet Twp. in the 
Spring Creek settlement. The mill used horse 
power, but by 1855 William Clarke operated a 
steam saw-mill (1855 Illinois Census). It ran for 
about ten to twelve years (Pioneers, 33-34). It 
was sometimes called "Spring Creek Mill." In 
1905 Chester Stocking set up a steam sawmill 
on the east half of the NE quarter of Sec. 5 "not 
far from where the Clarke's sawmill ran for 
years" (MDJ, 1/12/1905). 

CLARKESVILLE 

See Sciota. 

CLAY BANKS AND PITS 

McDonough County had a number of 
clay mines for local tile- and pottery plants 
(Lehner). The most extensive operations were 
in Macomb and Emmet townships, and in 
Colchester, the latter being a byproduct of coal 
mining. Listed below are those with distinct 
names and locations. 

Holler Clay Bank, located on the NE 
quarter of Sec. 22, Macomb Twp. on land owned 
by David Holler, supplied clay to the Bardolph 
Clay Works from 1874 to 1892 (Harris, M). 

Clay Pits was a strip-mined operation in 
the north half of the NE quarter of Sec. 20 in 
Macomb Twp. which supplied clay to the 
pottery plant on the east side of Macomb. The 
clay was mined here from 1890 to 1933. and 
was shipped on rails (Harris, Z.). 

Runkle's Clay Bank was located near 
the SE quarter of Sec. 16 ni Macomb Twp. It 
started operation in 1880 (1885 History. 998). 

Russell Clay Bank was located north of 
Macomb. The exact location is not known. It 
might have been on the NE quarter of Sec. 2 1 in 
Emmet Twp.. owned in 1913 by Clara Russell. 

Other known clay banks are on the NE 
quarter of Sec. 25 in Fmmet Twp., mined in 
1835 by a man named Cleveland and in 1879 by 
.loseph Patterson (1885 History, 694). on the 
NW quarter of Sec. 12 in Mound Twp., and in 
Colchester where .A. Ilorrocks ownetl a cla\ 
nunc HI I S(i(). 



20 



CLAY PIT CREEK 

This stream runs through sections 18, 
17, and 20 of Macomb Tvvp. It empties into the 
East Fork La Moine River. 

CLAYBAUGH CEMETERY 

See Osbom Cemetery. 

CLAYTON CEMETERY 

This small family burial plot, also called 
Clugston Cemetery, is located on the N\V 
quarter of Sec. 28 in Industry' Twp. It is not 
shown on maps. It is located on land owned in 
1871 by Samuel Clayton and R. Clugston. Only 
members of the Clayton Family are buried here. 

CLAXTON SCHOOL 

See Hickory Grove School (Emmet 
Twp.) 

CLERMONT 

Clermont was a typical paper town the 
memory of which has not survived, but which 
left several signs of its e.xistence. It was located 
in the SW quarter of the N\V quarter of Sec. 27 
in New Salem Twp. Abraham Powers in his 
autobiographical work tells of a town site 
surveyed by Anson Mathews and located five 
miles northwest from Foster's Point (Powers, 
35). County commissioners in 1837 levied ta.x 
on slaves, personal property, and town lots. One 
of the towns was Clermont (Commissioners: 
A/325). The same year Mathews sold the 
property in the NW quarter of Sec. 27 "being the 
lot of land on which the Town of Clermont is 
laid" (Deeds: C/531). Another reference to 
Clermont is an article in the Macomb Daily 
Journal for Jan. 12, 1907. It quotes Christopher 
Wetzel, who had bought land in Sec. 27 of New 
Salem Township in 1844, telling how he had 
found rotted wooden markers showing streets, 
blocks and lots. According to Wetzel, the extent 
of wood rot indicated that they were placed there 
before 1 840. He further stated that the person or 
persons who platted the land advertised in the 
New York papers that the place was located "at 
the headwaters of tlatboat navigation," i.e. the 
head of the Camp Creek. Wetzel also stated that 
the owner of the plat did not ha\e a title to it. 



No plat of Clermont could be located in 
the land deed records nor did the name appear 
on any map, indicating that this "peter funk" 
town on an tipen prairie was a speculative, 
fraudulent scheme. 

In French "clermont" means clear 
mountain. It is the name of Robert Fulton's 
famous steamboat, built in 1818 and also the 
name of an Ohio county. 

CLINE SCHOOL 

See Excelsior School. 

CLUGSTON CEMETERY 

See Clayton Cemetery. 

COAL CREEK 

This was one of the two early names for 
the South Branch La Moine River in 
Blandinsville Twp. Although the earliest known 
name for the creek was "Bagby," the 1861 
county map, the 1876 state atlas map, and the 
1879 Colton's map call the creek "Coal." 

The 1861 map of the county shows a 
coal mine on the NE quarter of Sec. 18 adjacent 
to the stream. 

See also La Moine River. 

COAL HOLLOW 

This place was mentioned in the 
Colchester Independent tor Jan. 6, 1972 as 
located "on Gin Ridge north of the Pruitt 
Cemetery." No t)ther information could be 
found. 

COAL MINES 

Except for Walnut Grove Twp., all of 
McDonough County is underlain by coal 
fomiations. These formations vary in thickness 
and depth, but can be readily observed on sides 
of deeply-incised stream valleys. Coal is said to 
have been mined in Colchester vicinity and on 
Baptist Creek near Blandinsville as early as 
1830s and by the Nauvoo Mormons from 1840 
to 1846 (1992 History', 52). With the coming of 
the railroad in 1856, numerous coal companies 
formed in the vicinity of Colchester. Other sites 
where coal was mined were on Sec. 24, 
Tennessee Twp., on the NE quarter of Sec. 16 in 
Bethel Twp. starting m 1853, and on Sec. 33 in 



21 



Bethel Twp. starting in 1858 (Clarke, 149). An 
1885 article in the Macomb Journal tells of 61 
coal mines in ten townships, which employed 
485 miners. Many were family owned and 
operated, but some, such as the Rippetoe & 
Rundle Mine near Colchester had sixty 
employees. Most of the underground, largely 
shaft-style mining, ceased in the 1930s. 

See also Eggerton Mines and Freeman 
Coal Mine. 

COAL RIDGE 

This is the northernmost of four ridges 
separated by three streams in the southeastern 
part of the county. Coal Ridge is the longest. It 
runs south of, and parallel to the East Fork La 
Moine River through the towns of Colmar, 
Tennessee, Colchester, Macomb, Bardolph and 
an area north of New Philadelphia (Shadwick, 
25). The name derives from exposed coal seams 
in stream valleys. 

COKER CEMETERY 

See Pennington Cemetery 
(Industry Twp.) 

COKER SCHOOL 

(No. 5, Industry Twp.; No. 143) 

The first location of this school was on 
the NW quarter of the NE quarter of Sec. 1 7, on 
land deeded by Thomas Pennington in 1866 
(Deeds: 22/263). In 1881 and 1882 G.W. Coker 
deeded land on the SE corner of the NW quarter 
of Sec. 17 (Deeds: 46/558; 46/132) where the 
school remained until its consolidation in 1948 
with the Industry School District No. 165. The 
building and grounds were sold by trustees in 
1950 (Adair \V. B, 2/21/1950; Deeds: 259/465). 

COLCHESTER 

I he town of Colchester was laid out by 
Charles A. (iilchrist and Lewis 11. Little on the 
NE quarter of Sec. 13 in what was then 
Tennessee Twp., and was entered into the 
records on Nov. 22, 1855 (Mortgages; F/164- 
165). In his letter to the editor of the Colchester 
Indepe ndent, dated Apr. 7, 1890, Little states 
that he named the lowii alter Slc\en Chester of 
New York. Accoriling to the Macomb Daily 
Journal (Aug. 15, iS9,S, p. 2) Chester was an 



employee of the Northern Cross Railroad who 
surveyed the tract of land belonging to Little on 
which Colchester now stands. According to 
Clarke (p. 677) Chester surveyed the town site 
and named the town after himself but the name 
had to be changed because of an already existing 
Chester in Illinois. In view of what is known 
about Steven Chester, he possibly did a survey 
for the Northern Cross Railroad including a 
town site on Little's land, but there is no 
evidence that he platted Colchester, nor that the 
town was ever named Chester as stated in the 
Illinois Place Names . Furthermore, the surveyor 
of Colchester was Charles A. Gilchrist, a native 
of the county, who was a surveyor for the C. B. 
& Q. Railroad. It is reasonable to assume that 
Lewis Little wanted to honor Chester who might 
have been instrumental in the initial siting of the 
town. His letter to the Colchester Independent 
should, therefore, be taken at face value. 

Since there was already another Chester 
in Randolph County, the name was changed by 
adding a prefix, "Col". The addition was 
appropriate. Settlers mined coal in the vicinity 
of Colchester as early as the 1830s and this 
caused the railroad line to bypassed Middleton, 
now Fandon, in favor of Colchester. Although 
this is not the only reason - it is said that the 
route favoring Fandon had grades too steep for 
the railroad to negotiate - the presence of coal 
and water in the vicinity of Colchester was 
obviously an important consideration in the 
ultimate choice of the route. Colchester mines 
shipped coal to Quincy even before rails were 
laid, and coal later became an important rail 
cargo. The dam at Pleasant Valley Mill supplied 
water for steam engines. 

Another, more subjective reason for 
naming the town Colchester is given b\ June 
Moon. She cites older people in tiie coninuinilv 
who attributed the name lo Colchester, 
England's oldest town, "which was well known 
to many English people who had settled here " 
(Moon, 21 ). fhis explanation may be valid only 
if the town platters wanted to honor their British 
heritage. Most Inglish and Welsh miners who 
setlleil 111 C'olcheslei arnvctl altei the liuvii was 
plaited aiul named because the railro.ui made it 
possible to open mines which attracleil these 
miiRMs. I'uillieiiuorc, C\>lcliesier. England, was 
not a coal milium town I here would hanlK be 



22 



reason for invoking this name for a newly 
platted town in America (MJ 9/18/1996, p.4A). 

Streets of Colchester, like those of 
Bardolph, Bushnell, Colniar and other railroad 
towns of the 1850s, conform to the direction of 
the railroad lines and do not follow the strict 
east-west and north-south orientation of the 
county's older communities. 

See also Chester. 

COLCHESTER SOUTH CEMETERY 

See Lower Cemetery. 

COLCHESTER TOWNSHIP 

This township was created in 1879 from 
sections 1, 12, 13, 24, 25. 36, and the east halves 
of sections 2, 11, 14, 23, 26, and 35 of 
Tennessee Twp. and sections 5, 6, 7, 8, 17, 18, 
19, 30, and 31 of Chalmers Twp. The township 
was named for the then-thri\ing town of 
Colchester. 

COLLINS SCHOOL 

See Mount Solon School. 

COLMAR 

This town was laid out by William M. 
Graves on the SE quarter of Sec. 7 of Lamoine 
Twp., and the town plat was filed on June 26, 
1858 (Plats: 1/40). The streets parallel the rail 
lines. Colmar has the same name as the 
picturesque town in Alsace-Lorraine in Eastern 
France, but no explanation could be found for 
this choice. This might be one of the few coined 
names in the county. 

COLMAR LAKES 

These were two fairly extensive shallow 
bodies of water with tributaries from the iu)rth 
and an outlet into the La Moine Ri\er to the 
south. The larger lake was located along the 
section line separating eastern halves of sections 
8 and 17 and the smaller one was located east 
between western parts of sections 9 and 16, both 
in Lamoine Twp. The lakes appear on the 
original survey maps and also on the 1861 and 
the 1871 maps. The most recent maps indicate a 
wet area on the line between sections 8 and 17. 



COLALVR-PLYMOUTH OH. FIELDS 

Originally developed in the 1910s, and 
located in the center and southwest Lamoine 
Township, these fields still yield some oil, 
although their importance has long since waned. 

See also Riley. 

COLMAR POST OFFICE 

Established July 27, 1858, the same year 
the town was platted, the post office was first 
located in the railroad depot ( 1 885 History, 664). 
Henry H. Groom was the first postmaster. 

COLOMA SCHOOL 

(No. 3, Eldorado Twp.; No. \S2) 

This school is well marked on all maps. 
It was located on the SW corner of Section 5 in 
Eldorado Twp. The first building was erected in 
1865, and was replaced in 1884 (1885 History, 
808). J. P. Marshall donated the land m 1883 
(Deeds: 51/220). The school consolidated into 
the Eldorado School District No. 154 and the 
grounds were sold off in 1947 (Deeds: 204/279). 

The name Coloma originated in 
California. It was the name of a Maidu Indian 
village. No explanation for this name could be 
found. 

CONCORD BAPTIST CHURCH 

This Regular or Primitive Baptist 
Church was organized in 1841 "at the home of 
Brother Abel Friend in McDonough County" 
and dissolved in 1847 (Peter. 101-102). Abel 
Friend owned property on sections 30 and 20 in 
Lamoine Twp. He left the county after his wife 
died. It seems that this congregation never built 
its own church (Webb). 

See also Friend Grave. 

COPES BRANCH 

This was an early name for the west 
tributary of the Drowning Fork. It originates in 
Sec. 6 and joins Drowning Fork in Sec. 4 of 
Prairie City Twp. The name, which appears on 
the 1861 map, comes from Wesley Cope who at 
the time owned part of Sec. ^ and the east half of 
Sec. 4 in Prairie City Township. 



23 



CORN HILL SCHOOL 

(No. 6, New Salem T>vp.; No. 86) 

Situated on the SW corner of Sec. 13, 
this school appears on the 1<S61 map so it must 
have been built in the KS50s. The 1879 deed 
from S. Ross verifies the location (Deeds; 
41/468). The grounds were sold off in 1946 
(Deeds: 197/214) after the school consolidated 
into the Adair School District. 

The name comes from the location in 
the middle of a cornfield (1976 History, 38). 
The geological map of 1919 indicates that this is 
elevated land. Prior to the use of drain tiles, 
high-lying prairie was prized for farming. 

CORNERSTONE FARM 

See Shaw Creek. 

COST CEMETERY 

See Pioneer Cemetery. 

COTTAGE CORNER SCHOOL 
(No. L Bethel Twp.; No. 130) 

The first schoolhouse of District No. 1 
was located north of the SE comer of the NE 
quarter of Sec. 3, where it is shown in 1856 
(RSR, 151) and also on the 1861 map. In 1859 
the district was reorganized into districts 1 and 
9. District 1 became a union district with 
Chalmers Twp. with the schoolhouse located on 
the NW comer of Sec. 1 (Clarke, p. 428), on 
land donated in 1866 by Russell Rigg (Deeds: 
17 64(J). The school is shown in this location on 
all maps starting in 1871, except for the 1893 
map. The comer is the intersection of present 
county roads 1 lOOE and 600N where there is a 
jog in the road. The school was consolidated into 
the F.benezer District in 1946. 

The name "Cottage Corner" probably 
described a small settlement with a cluster of 
residences around the intersection shoun in the 
1871 atlas. 

See also New Tra School. 

COTTONWOOD (II11R(H 

This Iiec-Wiii Baptist (lunch was 
shoun on the 1SM3. ihc 1915, ami the l'*!^) 
maps. It was !i)calecl east of the Coltonwood 
School on the NW comer of Sec. 34 in Mound 
Twp. An I 889 deed from .lames Allen confirms 



the location (Deeds: 55/577). The congregation 
did not rebuild after a tomado destroyed the 
building in 1924. 

Cottonwood trees were important 
landmarks on the otherwise featureless prairie. 
They served as navigation points to early 
travelers. The location of the Cottonwood 
Church and School was on an open prairie, so 
the name most probably derived from a 
conspicuous single tree or a grove of trees. 

COTTONWOOD CORNER 

This well-known county landmark is 
located on the SW comer of Sec. 30 in Bushnell 
Twp. The Cottonwood tree for which the 
crossing was named was five feet in diameter. 
Mathew B. Robinson, the first settler in 
Bushnell Twp., planted it in 1836 to mark the 
southwest comer of his fami. The tree was so 
cherished that when the hard road was 
constructed, the tree was left standing in the 
middle of the road (Torrance). It stood until 
1961. 

COTTONWOOD SCHOOL 
(No. 6, Mound Twp.; No. 78) 

Built in 1856, this school was located on 
the NE corner of Sec. 33. where it remained 
throughout its existence, on land donated to the 
district in 1863 by Orrin TunmclitT (Deeds: 
10/523). The school was always known as 
Cottonwood, and was well marked on maps. It 
consolidated with the Bardolph School in 1947. 
The grounds were sold in the same year (Deeds: 
190/490). 

For origin of the name see Cottonwood 
Church. 

COUNTY FARM 

"Poor farm" is first mentioned in 1850 
m the records of the County Commissioners 
(\>urt (Commissioners: C 149). Prior to this 
time indigent count\ residents were cared for in 
pri\alc residences at count\ "s expense. On 
December 10, 1852 the County entered into a 
contract with .lames P llogue to purchase 
several parcels o\ land kKalcil on sections 13 
and 24 in 1 inmet and sections IS and 1'' in 
Maciiiiib townships "for the purposes ol Poor 
House l-arm" (Cominissioners: C 374; 



24 



Mortgages: M/299). The county turni was first 
located on Sec. 13 in Emmet Twp. (1885 
History, 687), but the tlrst County Farm building 
to house the poor was on the SW quarter of Sec. 
8 in Macomb Twp. The land was secured in 
1861 when the county exchanged its earlier- 
acquired holdings with Alexander V. Brooking 
(Deeds: 9/214). The county built the buildmg in 
1862, shown in 1871 on the SW corner of the 
quarter section. Oral tradition has it that there 
was also a cemetery, but there is no record of it. 

The Poor Farm in Macomb Twp. ceased 
operation in 1884, at which time a new 
Almshouse was built on the SE quarter of Sec. 7 
in Scotland Twp. This latter farm had a 
cemetery located a quarter mile east of the 
building. In 1949 the "County Fami" or 
"Almshouse" was turned into a nursing home 
and renamed "The Elms" because the building 
was surrounded by elm trees. By 1958 the 
building was overcrowded and outdated. A new 
facility in Bushnell, also called Elms, replaced 
the old almshouse. Ultimately Elms Nursing 
Home was relocated to Macomb. 

See also Brooking Cemetery. 

COUNTY FARM CEMETERY 

This cemetery, located on the SE quarter 
of Sec. 7 in Scotland Twp., was part of the 
county almshouse. When the building was 
removed, graves were also relocated. Only one 
grave remains in the original location, that of 
Private Nolan, a Civil War veteran (1976 
History, 45). This cemetery is not marked on 
any county map. 

COVER SCHOOL 

See Excelsior School. 

COW FORD BRIDGE 

This is an important bridge over the La 
Moine River just south of the mouth of the 
Hogwallow Branch. In 1838 this crossing of the 
river was a ford on the Lower Rapids Road 
(Commissioners: A/'21), and is shown as such in 
1856 (RSR, 154). The 1861 and 1871 maps 
show a bridge in the middle of the NE quarter of 
Sec. 34. Contemporary maps locate it near the 
SE comer of the NW quarter of Sec. 34. 

See also Lower Rapids Road. 



CRABB BRIDGE 

This bridge is located on the East Fork 
La Moine River on the NI* corner oi' Sec. 21 in 
Macomb Twp. The bridge was named for the 
prominent Crabb family, which owned land 
north from the site. The present bridge was built 
in 1985 (Redman). 

CRABB SETTLEMENT 

Clarke locates this population cluster 
5 miles northeast from Macomb (Clarke, 342). 
The name comes from the .lohn Crabb Family, 
which included several sons, owners of land on 
sections 8. 16 and 17 of Macomb Twp. 

CRABB SCHOOL 

(No. 4, Macomb Twp.; No. 62) 

This school, called by Clarke "Mt. 
Pleasant School," was organized in 1858 at the 
house of John M. Crabb (1885 History, 997). 
The building was erected on the west side of the 
NW quarter of Sec. 16. and is shown in this 
location on all county maps through 1940. No 
deeds could be located. 

CRAIG CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the SW 
quarter of Sec. 34 in Scotland Twp., on land 
donated in 1865 by Craig, Sims, Anstine, 
Odenweller, and Rings families "in trust for 
themselves and each and every member of their 
families and for the purpose of a burying 
ground" (Deeds: 18/7). The grave of Harriet 
Craig was already on the premises. The 
cemetery is not marked on any map. but contains 
the grave of Richard Craig, a veteran of the War 
of 1812. 

CRESTON GLADE SCHOOL 
(No. 7, Blandinsville Twp.; No. 38) 

This school v\as first located on the SW 
quarter of Sec. 30 on land deeded by O.M. Lisk 
in 1885 (Deeds: 59/561). The first time the 
school is shown on the map was in 1893. It was 
then located on the NW corner of the NE quarter 
of Section 31. where it remained until its closing 
when it consolidated intt) the Blandins\ille- 
Sciota District tt 175 in 1946. The grounds were 
sold off in 1949 (Deeds: 206/53). 



25 



The school was also known as Harris 
school, the name deriving from the Reuben 
Harris land holdings shown in the 1871 atlas just 
west from the latter school site. "Creston" 
derives from crest or summit, and "glade" means 
an open space in a forest, coming from "glad" or 
shining. The name might have indicated a 
school located on a sunny summit, surrounded 
by woods. 

CROOKED CREEK 

See La Moine River. 

CROSS CREEK 

See Baptist Creek. 

CROSSROADS or CROSS ROADS 

This was the popular name of a 
neighborhood centered on the intersection of 
present county roads 1650 E and 150 N, near the 
center of Sec. 26 in Industry Twp. The site was 
part of Carter's Settlement started in 1826. The 
roads converging on the settlement were the 
Galena Trail and the Lower Rapids Road. At 
Crossroads, the Galena Trail split from the 
Beardstown-Macomb Road to angle northeast, 
while the Lower Rapids Road led west to 
present Warsaw. 

See also Carter's Settlement, Brattleville 
Post Ottlce, and Old Fort. 

CROSSROADS CEMETERY 

See Springer Grave. 

CROSSROADS METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

This church was located on the NW 
corner of the SE quarter of Sec. 26, in Industry 
Twp., part of the old Crossroads neighborhood. 
It was built in 1857 (1885 History, 457) and is 
shown on the 1871 and the 1876 maps, hut no 
deed could be located to verify the date of 
building. I he 1893 and later maps shou it on 
the NE corner ol' the S\V quarter, just east from 
the school. The church rcmauietl in this location 
until closure. Accorctnig lo the Maco m b Daily 
Journal article, the budding was torn tlown in 
1922 (MIXL 10/14/1922, p.5). The ciuuvii was 
also known as Pleasant (inne Methoilist 
Episco|ial ( luircli 



CROSSROADS SCHOOL 
(No. 4, Industry Twp.; No. 146) 

This school was built in 1858 on the NE 
comer of the SW quarter of Sec. 26 where it is 
shown on the 1861 map. It seems that the 
school was known as Standard School before 
District No. 4 split into districts No. 4 and No. 8. 
No deeds could be found. In the 1880s the 
school was known as Pleasant Grove, but in later 
years it was called Crossroads. In 1949 it 
consolidated into the Industry District No. 165. 
The building was sold in 1950 (Adair W.B., 
12/21/1950). 

See also Standard School and Dixie 
School. 

CROWL SCHOOL 

(No. 8, Mound Twp.; No. 207) 

This district was organized in I860 and 
the school built the same year on the SE comer 
of Sec. 2, where it is shown on the 1871, 1893, 
and the 1919 maps. The 1913 atlas and later 
maps show the building on the SW comer of 
Sec. 1. No deeds could be found to verify when 
the school was moved. Both locations, just 
across the section line from each other, were 
surrounded by land owned by the Henry Myers 
family. Meyers and John Croul, uho was one 
of the directors of the school district, were 
members of the Bushnell Church. This German 
Baptist congregation and its successor in the 
area, the Spring Run German Baptist Church, 
met in the schoolhouse from 1865 to 1927. The 
school consolidated into Sperry District No. 71 
in June of 1946. 

See also Spring Run German Baptist 
Church. 

CROWN POINT SCHOOL 
(No. 1, Scotland Twp., No. 90) 

Started m IS56 (iS85 History. 725) on 
the SW corner oi' Sec. 1 where it is shown 
throughout its existence, this school was situated 
on high ground at the head oi' Troublesome 
Creek. The site might have intluenced the choice 
of the name for it was known by this name from 
the earliest rectirds. The school consolidated 
with the Bardolph School District in 1947 and 
the grouiuls were sokl to private owners in 1947 
(McDonough C.T.. 7/31 1947). No deeds could 
be k>cated. 



26 



CUBA CORNER 

This is the intersection of present county 
roads 350E and 1200N, on the section ime 
between Sec. 3 of Tennessee and Sec. 34 of Hire 
townships on the old Beardstown-Burlington 
Road. The name derives from the Orval Cuba 
family, which occupied the farm north from the 
intersection. 

CURTIS SCHOOL 

(No. 1, Prairie City Twp., No. 205) 

This school appears on the Ni; corner of 
Sec. 12 m 1861. does not show in 1871, and is 
located on the SE comer of Sec. 1 from 18Q3 
until 1922. In 1929 and 1940 it is located again 
on the NE comer of Sec. 12. No deed could be 
found to confimi the location on Sec. 12, but in 
1864 John E. Durham issued a land deed for part 
of the SE quarter of Sec. 1 (Deeds: 13/99). 
which confirms the 1893 location. The school 
ceased operation in 1947 when it was 
consolidated into the Prairie City District and the 
Sec. 1 property was sold (Deeds: 190/567). 

The name probably honors the Curtis 
family. Edgar E. Curtis, a Civil War casualty 
from McDonough County, was the brother of 
George Curtis, the farmer tVom Prairie City 
Twp. 

See also Union Districts (Bushnell and 
Prairie City townships). 

Additional Notes 



27 



D 



DAILEY CEMETERY 

This family graveyard is located on the 
NW quarter of Sec. 6, in Eldorado Twp., on land 
settled by Thomas Dailey. Family burials were 
between 1840 and 1860. In later years the 
cemetery was also called Moore Cemetery. On 
the 1913 atlas the cemetery was surrounded by 
land owned by Frank Moore. 

DAILEY CREEK 

See Grindstone Creek. 

DARWIN STATION 

See Scottsburg. 

DEAKINS CREEK 

See La Harpe Creek. 

DECKER BRIDGE 

This bridge crossed the East Fork La 
Moine River on county road 1700E between 
sections 13 and 14 in Macomb Twp. (Harris, Z.). 
The 1871 atlas map shows a road crossing at this 
pomt but the bridge appears first on the 1893 
atlas map. The bridge was named after the 
Decker family, who owned land adjacent to the 
site. 



DEER PARK 

This attraction of McDonough County 
in the mid- 19""^ century was located on the NE 
comer of Sec. 16 in Walnut Grove Twp. It is 
shown only on the 186! map. There are several 
references to the park which was on the trail 
from Fairview and EUisville in Fulton County to 
Fort Madison ferry on the Mississippi River 
(Newsletter, 14:2/4). A description is found in 
John Regan's account of his travels through 
western Illinois in the 1840s. According to 
Regan, the park was owned by Abel [i.e. Abner] 
Walker and consisted of an enclosed area where 
"Mr. Walker kept deer and other wild animals 
because he could not do without them" (Regan, 
55, 246). Many years later William Brooking in 
his memoir remembered a deer park owned by 
Quintus Walker, "the most noted deer hunter in 
the county." The park contained about fifteen 
tame deer. The fence was made of rails set on 
end. and the deer were let out to feed in 
cornfields. When wild bucks followed does into 
the enclosure they were killed (Rezab, 140). 

The deer park was a curiosity 
remembered for a long time. Regan and 
Brooking confirmed its existence in the 1840s. 
In 1863 the Illinois Conference of the United 
Brethren Church established a Deer Park 
Mission, later called Good Hope Circuit (1885 
History, 485). The park is mentioned again in 
the 1885 history (p. 1040), and as late as 1895 
the Macomb Dailv Journal refers to it as "Deer 
Park Grove" (Ilallwas, 1984, 33). 



DECKER CREEK 

See La llarpe Creek. 



DEER PARK MISSION 

See Center Church. 



DECKER SCHOOL 

(No. 1, Macomb Iwp.. No. 6(») 

This scIkh)1 tiistrict was reorgani/ed in 
1866 and a house iiKi\eci IVom District No. 2 to 
the NW quarter of Sec. 12 (C larke. 424), where 
it is shown on the 1871 ami the 1876 maps. In 
1893 tiic school IS located on the .S\V corner ol 
Sec. 1. Nt) land deeds could be found to verify 
when the school changed locations. The 
building and its contents were ottereil lor sale on 
Nov. 6, 1948 (MI)J). 



DENNIS CEMETERY 

This is a private cemcterv' located on the 
S\\ quarter of Sec. 26 in Eldorado Twp. Isaiah 
Denniss purchased the land in 1S51 (Deeds: 
P 392), and seemed to lui\e resided there until 
1857. It is not known who is buried there. 

DIXIE S( IIOOI. 

(No. 8, Industry T>\p.; No. 145) 

localetl near the Nf corner o\' Sec. 23. 
this school IS slu)\Mi on all nia|is it w.is huilt in 
1864 when the former District No. 4 with school 
biiildinu locatcii on the NE (.uiarler of the SW 



28 



quarter of Sec. 26 shown in 1S61, split into 
districts No. 4 and No. 8. John Wilson, a native 
of Tennessee, who had settled in the county in 
1828, deeded the school grounds in 1867 
(Deeds: 26/493). In 1909 the land reverted back 
to Wilson with "the old school house" still 
standing (Deeds: 115/428). The school 

remained in the location until 1949 when it 
consolidated into the Industry School District 
No. 165. The building sold in 1950 (Adair W. 
B., 12/21/1950). and the land in 1951 (Deeds: 
215/65). 

"Dixie" was the ten-dollar bill issued by 
a New Orleans bank during the Civil War. The 
name came to signify the southern part of the 
United States, or Di.xieland, where the banknote 
circulated. 

See also Standard School and 
Crossroads School. 

DODDSVTLLE 

This hamlet was laid out by Samuel 
Dodds, Charles Bacon, and Paris Wheeler on the 
SW quarter of Sec. 32 of Industry Twp. and on 
the adjacent NW quarter of Sec. 5 in Littleton 
Twp. in Schuyler County. The plat was entered 
on July 6, 1836 (Deeds: C/106). Doddsville. like 
Seawardsville, was located on the important 
road from Vermont to Fort Edwards (present day 
Warsaw). 

See also Seawardsville. 

DODDSVILLE CEMETERY 

Located on the SW quarter of Sec. 32 of 
Industry Twp., just north of the town site, this 
cemetery is still in use. The earliest burials date 
from the 1840s. Samuel Dodds donated the land 
in 1866 (Deeds: 20/166). In 1925 the cemetery 
was called Runkle because Danus Runkle was 
one of the cemetery trustees and many Runkle 
family members were buried there. 

DODDSVILLE POST OFFICE 

Doddsville is the successor post office 
to Brattleville. It was established on February 
25, 1837 and was located in Schuyler County. 
As postmasters changed, so did the locations of 
the post office. On January 1 . 1 842 the office 
was called Evergreen and was located in 
McDonough County with Darius Runkle on Sec. 



33, Industry Twp. as postmaster. On September 
21. 1848 the office was again called Doddsville, 
and was located in the village. On July 29, 1857 
it moved to Schuyler County and on May 7, 
1887 back to McDonough. The post office 
closed on June 30. 1903. Its functions 
transferred to the Macomb Post Office. 
See also Brattleville Post Office. 

DOG TOWN 

Sec Lamoinc (Settlement). 

DOLLAR POND 

This is a depression located on the SW 
quarter of Sec. 14 in Macomb Twp.. just 50 
yards north of the East Fork La Moine River. It 
fills with water during Hoods, and years ago 
when it was deeper, it was used for duck hunting 
and ice skating. The name comes from its 
perfectly round shape (Thorman). The origin of 
this depression is not known. It might have been 
excavated by men, but more likely it is a large 
"buffalo wallow," a geological formation which 
occurs when a large chunk of glacial ice is 
covered with drift and then melts creating a 
depression on the ground surface. Prior to white 
settlement such depressions, often wet, might 
have been favored bv buffalo. 

DOVE CREEK 

See Grindstone Creek. 

DOVLES MILL 

See Lamoinc Mills. 

DRISKILLS BRIDGE 

The name of this bridge appeared in 
1851 (RSR, 79). The bridge was located on the 
NE comer of Sec. 15 in Bethel Twp., over Camp 
Creek on the state road from Macomb to 
Quincy. In 1861 and on later maps the road is 
shown to cross the creek in the SW corner of 
Sec. 15. The bridge was named for Thomas 
Driskill, an early settler in the township. 

See also Camp Creek Bridge. 



29 



DROWNING FORK 

This stream originates in Warren 
County, runs south through Prairie City and 
Bushneil townships, and joins East Fork La 
Moine River in the NW quarter of Sec. 8 in 
Mound Tvvp. The drowning of two soldiers in 
the late 1820s (Hallwas, 1984, 5-11) gave the 
creek its name. One of the soldiers was David 
Brasel, who is said to have drowned in 1827 
while on a trip home from fighting Indians on 
the Fever River during the Winnebago War. 
Brasel, a veteran of the War of 1812. was a 
member of an influential family in the county 
and his death probably occasioned the naming of 
the creek. The earliest official mention of the 
name as "Drowning Fork of Crooked Creek" 
appears on October 8, 1830 (Commissioners: 
A/ 14). The same year county commissioners 
mention "Drown Creek" (Commissioners; 
Ay 17). and in 1831 "Drowning Creek" 
(Commissioners: A/27). This confirms Hallwas" 
theory that the soldiers were not in Lincoln's 
expedition as local lore has claimed. 

The drowning incidence made a lasting 
impression on the early settlers and apparently 
raised the importance of the stream in their 
minds. In 1830, 1831. and as late as 1836 
county commissioners call the uhole East Fork 
La Moine River "Drowning Fork," 
(Commissioners: A/299), and even the 1861 
map, created by a local surveyor, shows the East 
Fork as "Drowning Fork." The 1876 Atlas of 
the State of Illinois calls the creek "Romin." 
There is no explanation for this name. 

See La Moine Ri\ er. 

DROWNING FORK GRAVEYARD 

This burial site is located on the SW 
quarter of Sec. 7 in Mound Twp. According to 
local lore it is the gravesite of two soldiers in 
Abraham Lincoln's militia unit who driiwned 
while crossing the creek on their way to fight in 
the Black Hawk War. Tradition has it that the 
creek was naniecl lor these two soldiers, but 
Hallwas disputes the date of the drowning and 
the identity of the soldiers. (Hallwas, l')S4. 5- 
I 1 ). 1 he ileath dates recorded on the niarker are 
1832 ((inmm), the year of the Black Hawk War 
It is not known who erected the inaiker anil 
when. 

See also Dkumiiii!.' lork. 



DROWNING FORK POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on 
March 13, 1836 with Joseph Crawford as 
postmaster. Crawford's residence was at that 
time on the north half of Sec. 6 in Mound Twp. 
near Drowning Fork. On July 25, 1848 the post 
otfice moved to the present site of Bushneil just 
two miles northeast, and on March 13. 1858 it 
became Bushneil Post Office, still with 
Crawford as postmaster. 

DUBLIN SCHOOL 

See Hickory Grove School (Emmet 
Twp.) 

DUCK ISLAND 

According to the Macomb Daily Journal 
for 1880 this was an island in Crooked Creek, 
now East Fork La Moine River, one and one half 
miles northeast of Macomb. Precise location is 
unknown. 

DUNCAN CEMETERY 

Located on the SW quarter of the SW 
quarter of Sec. 31 in Blandins\ille Twp., this 
family burial ground appears only in the 1913 
atlas of the county. The name derives from the 
many members of the Duncan family interred 
here. The first burials were in the early 1850s. 

DUNCAN CHURCH 

See Zion Chapel Free Methodist 
Church. 

DUNKARD CEMETERY 

Located a quarter mile southeast of the 
center of See. 18 in Bethel Twp., this cemetery 
was established in 1880 as the cemetery of the 
Dunkard or German Baptist Brethren Church. 
In 1901 William M. Ilarlacher donated land "to 
be used as a cemeter\ and for church purpoces 
(sic)" (Deeds: 90 328). The eemeter> is still in 
use. 

See also Camp Creek Church. 

DUNKARD( HURC H 

See Camp Creek t'luHch. 



30 



DUNSVVORTH CEMETERY 

This is a family burial localcd on the 
NE quarter of Sec. 7 in Bethel Tvvp., on land 
owned by James H. Dunsworth. It is not shown 
on any map but was probably connected to the 
New Hope Methodist Episcopal Church shown 
only on the 1861 map. There is no information 
about the burials in this cemetery. It is said that 
the cemetery contains graves of four children 
who died in 1830. 

See also New Hope Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

DUTCH MILL 

This was a small "tourist camp" 
consisting of a restaurant and a motel built by 
Ralph Swearingen in 1927 in order to attract 
customers to his oil station (Newsletter. 14:1/2). 
The wind mill, the only remaining structure, is 
located on the NW corner of Sec. 15 on 
Highway 67, north of Industry. 

DYE CEMETERY 

See Pope Cemetery. 

DYER CEMETERY 

See Upper Mound Cemetery. 

DYER CHURCH 

See Mound United Brethren Church. 

DYER'S MOUND 

This elevation is located on Sec. 14 in 
Mound Twp. It is named for the Dyer family, 
early settlers in the vicmity. Because this mound 
is a rather conspicuous elevation on an otherwise 
flat prairie, it has been incorrectly assumed to be 
the highest point in the county. The mound is a 
remnant of a glacial moraine formed at the end 
of the Illinois Glacial Period. It gave Mound 
Twp. its name. 



31 



E 



EAGLE COMMUNITY 

This was a settlement between Camp 
Creek and Grindstone Creek on sections 21 and 
22 of Bethel Twp. (Newsletter. 5/1,7). 

Located in a heavily forested area, the 
name probably implies the presence of eagles 
during the early years of white settlement. 
Bethel Twp. was first called Eagle Township, so 
the name of the neighborhood might have been 
an attempt to preserve the old name. 

See also Bethel Township. 

EAGLE COMMUNITY CHURCH 

This church started in 1945 as a Free 
Methodist congregation that met in the Eagle 
School house on the NW comer of the NE 
quarter of Sec. 29 in Bethel Twp. The 
congregation bought the building in 1947 and in 
1950 it became an Assembly of God Church. 
The school was replaced in 1952 by the former 
White Flock church. Regular services were 
discontinued in 1988 (Shelley). The building 
now serves as a private residence. 

See also Eagle School. 

EAGLE SCHOOL 

(No. 3 Bethel Twp., No. 133) 

This school was organized in 1845 
(1885 History. 707), but no land deed was issued 
until 1 862 when Thomas Shoopman donated one 
half acre on the NW corner of the NE quarter of 
Sec. 29 (Deeds: 12/480). The site is confirmed 
by the 1871 and the 1893 atlases of the county. 
A new building, erected in 1879. was located on 
the SW quarter of Sec. 21 (1885 History, 707), 
and is shown in this locatu>n in the 1 91 3 atlas 
and all later maps. However, the 1913 atlas also 
shows the earlier location of the school on Sec. 
29, which is probably a mistake. In May of 
1947 I'agle School became the school R)r Bethel 
School District No. 133, which was formed from 
New Era, West Bethel, East Bethel, Eagle, 
Victor, and Mt. Zion schools. 



EAGLE TOWN 

See Bethel Township. 

EAST BETHEL CHURCH 

This Methodist Episcopal congregation 
first met on the NE quarter of Sec. 14 in Bethel 
Twp. in the East Bethel school house. The 
church, erected in 1905 on land donated by 
William Wilson Jr. (Deeds: 101/52), was located 
on the NE comer of Sec. 23 of Bethel Twp., 
which was also called Hickory Grove Comer. 
Services were held here until 1962, when the 
church united with the Industry Methodist 
Church. In April of 1969 the grounds passed 
into private hands (Deeds: 264/248-9). The 
building was used for community meetings until 
1978 (Curtis). 

See also Hickory Grove Comer. 

E.\ST BETHEL SCHOOL 
(No. 4. Bethel Twp., No. 134) 

This school started in 1840 on Sec. 22. 
It moved to Sec. 14 in 1859 and in 1869 a new 
frame school house was built on the SE comer 
of the NE quarter of Sec. 14, Bethel Twp. 
William R. Wells granted the deed for the land 
in 1870 (Deeds: 31/37) and the school remained 
in this place until its closure. Prior to the 
building of East Bethel Church religious 
services and a re\i\al meeting in 1904 were held 
in it. The school was consolidated in 1948 into 
the Bethel School District No. 133, and the 
building was sold by trustees in 1950 (Adair W. 
B., 12/21/1950). In the late 1800s this school 
was known as Venard (MDJ, 12 10 1885). The 
name comes from John or George Venard who 
li\ed on Sec. 14. 

EAST FORK CROOKED CREEK 

This was the ottlcial name for the East 
Fork La Moine Riser prior to the name change. 
Sec La Moine Ri\er. 

EAST FORK LA MOINE RI\ ER 

See la Momc Ri\er. 

EAST RAILROAD SCHOOL 

(No. 8. Sciota T\>p.; No. 27) 

Located on the Nl' corner ol Sec. 33. 
this scluH)! IS shown on .ill nui|or maps ot the 
coiiiil\ Iroin 18~l on. e\cc|M in I'M 3 I'he name 



32 



derives from its location on tiic I'olcdo, I'coria 
and Western Railroad, east from the town of 
Sciota. The date of the school organization 
could not be verified and no deeds could be 
found. This school was also known as Frog 
Pond School. It consolidated into the Sciota 
District No. 28 in April of 1947. 

EAST SCHOOL 

(No. 4, Lamoine Twp.; No. 1 24) 

The first school on this site was erected 
in 1 847 or 1 848 (1 885 History, 662). The build- 
ing is first shown in 1861 on the NW comer of 
the SE quarter of Sec. 28 and on subsequent 
maps in adjacent locations on different quarter 
sections. No land deed could be found and there 
is no known explanation for "East." The school 
is last shown on the original site in 1940. 

EBENEZER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

This congregation organized in 1861 
when Camp Creek Presbyterian Church split 
into eastern (Camp Creek) and western 
(Ebenezer) factions over the location of the new 
church building. Ebenezer Church was erected 
the same year on the NW corner of Sec. 32 in 
Scotland Twp. on land donated by Samuel G. 
Henderson (Deeds: 10/57). The original 
building was replaced by a new sanctuary in 
1912. The congregation worshiped in this 
sanctuary until 1993, when it joined the Camp 
Creek and Bardolph Presbyterian churches to 
fomi Scotland Trinity Presbyterian Church on 
the site of the burned-out Camp Creek 
Presbyterian Church. 

The name Ebenezer comes from the Old 
Testament. It is the stone set up by Samuel as a 
memorial to divine aid in his defeat of the 
Philistines. The name might lia\'e retlected the 
sentiment of its founders at the time of their split 
from Camp Creek Presbyterian Church. 

See also Camp Creek Presbyterian 
Church and Scotland Trinity Presbyterian 
Church. 

EBENEZER SCHOOL 

(No. 9, Scotland T>vp.; No. 98) 

This school was organized in 1847 when 
John Kinkade donated land to "District No. 2" 
on the NE comer of the West half of the SW 
quarter of Sec. 32 in Scotland Twp. (Deeds: 



L/517) at which lime the school was a union 
school for Scotland and Chalmers townships. 
The school relocated in 1 863 to the SW corner 
of Sec. 29 (Clarke, 726) and is shown on all 
county maps starting in 1871. but no land deed 
could be located. In .lune of 1947 the school 
became the Ebenezer Consoliilated School 
District No. 98, which included Cottage Corner 
and Excelsior sclu)i)ls. The grounds were sold 
off in 1952 (Deeds: 206/498).^ 

EDMONSON'S PRAIRIE 

This was one of McDonough County's 
early settlements listed in Peck's Gazetteer in 
1837 (Peck, 194). The name comes from 
William and James Edmonston, also spelled 
"Edmondson," early settlers in Chalmers and 
Bethel townships. The prairie was the so-called 
Middle Ridge, between Troublesome and Camp 
creeks. Peck describes the prairie as one to two 
miles wide and ten miles long located six miles 
southwest from Macomb. Fandon is located on 
this prairie now. 

EGERTON or EGGERTON MINES 

This was one of the largest coal 
companies in McDonough County. The mine 
was located on Sec. 13 in Colchester Twp. It 
started operation in 1856 as St. Louis Coal 
Company, shipping Colchester coal over the 
newly built C.B.&Q. Railroad. In 1879 William 
Eggerton became the sole proprietor. The mines 
ceased operation around 1900. 

See also Coal mines. 

EGYPT SCHOOL 

(No. 4, Eldorado Twp.; No. LS3) 

This school was located on the NE 
comer of Sec. 19 on land donated by J.B. 
Standard in 186 1 (Deeds: 52/523). It is marked 
on all county maps. The school consolidated into 
the Eldorado School District No. 154 in March 
of 1947, but later withdrew. The building was 
sold in 1950 (Adair W. B., 12/21/1950) and the 
land in 1951 (Deeds: 206/256). 

The name probably derives either from 
the Old Testament "I. and of Egypt," referring to 
the rich agricultural soil of the township, or to 
the southemmost part o( Illinois, also called 
"Egypt." 



33 



EIGHT MILE CORNER 

This is the intersection of U.S. Highway 
136 and Illinois Highway 41. The name refers 
to the distance from Macomb. 

ELDORADO SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 154 

This was the name for the consolidated 
school district located in the previous Si.xteen 
School. The consolidation took place in March 
of 1947 and included the Nevada, Coloma, Mud 
Acre, Harvey, Price, Chockley, and Sixteen 
schools. 

ELDORADO TOWN HALL 

In 1874 the Leighty family donated land 
to Eldorado Township on the SW corner of Sec. 
15 (Deeds: 39/380). A town hall is shown on 
this site from 1893 to 1913. It was razed in 
2004. 

ELDORADO TOWNSHIP 

This is Congressional Township 4North 
and 1 West from the 4"' Principal Meridian. 
Arthur .1. Foster was the first settler in 1831. 

It seems that the early name of the 
township was Sugar Creek as evidenced by the 
initial name of Foster Presbyterian Congregation 
as "Sugar Creek Precinct". The name was used 
in 1842 and in 1852 prior to the adoption of the 
township system in 1856 when the township was 
officially named Fldorado (Harris, 1987). 

El Dorado is Spanish for "the golden 
one," and was originally used as a name for a 
legendary city in South America. In time it 
came to mean a place of great riches. The name 
probably refiected t)n the sod prt)ductivity and 
wealth to be gained. 

See also Foster's Point. 

ELI'S BOTTOM 

Fills several-acre site of densely 
timbered bt)ttomland located on the liast Fork La 
Moine River in Sec. 13 of Macomb Twp. was 
known locally for a variety of wild flowers in 
spring. The laiul was named lor Idi Holler who 
owned the projierly. 

klm(;rove 

I'his was Ihc ii.niK- loi an caiK 
MeiuiilKuhood cluslei in lliii.' Ivsp, wliicii 



started in 1838 with the farmstead of Thomas S. 
Hainline on the NE comer of Sec. 15. 

The elm, a tree species native to Illinois, 
was often deliberately planted for its graceful 
form and shade. The word "grove" indicates a 
growth of trees in an otherwise open country. 
The name is commendatory, suggesting comfort, 
beauty and uniqueness of location. This place 
name is frequently used in the U.S. 

ELM grove school 
(No. 5, Hire Twp.; No. 44) 

This school was originally located on 
the NW comer of the SE quarter of Sec. 15 
where it is shown in 1856 (RSR, 146) and also 
in 1861 on the same site as the Elm Grove 
United Brethren Church. An 1857 land gift 
from Israel Nunn to the school directors 
confirms the location (Deeds: 5/448). Clarke's 
history states that in 1862 the school building 
was moved onto Sec. 22 (Clarke, 432). This 
latter site, on the NW comer of Sec. 22, is 
shown in 1871 and later maps and remains the 
location of the school until consolidation in the 
1940s. The school grounds sold in 1959 (Deeds; 
230/117). 

ELM GROVE UNITED BRETHREN 
CHURCH 

Also called Church of the United 
Brethren in Christ and United Brethren Church 
of Hire Township, this congregation organized 
in 1855 and apparently met in the Elm Gro\e 
School. It built its house of worship in 1866 on 
the former school site deeded to the church in 
1867 by Israel Null (Deeds: 22/565). Maps for 
1871, 1876, and 1893 show the building on the 
NW corner of the Sli quarter o\' Section 15 in 
Hire Twp. In 1903 this property was sold into 
private hands (Deeds: 91/199). No church is 
shown on the 1913 map The 1919 map 
indicates a church building on the SF corner of 
Section 16, which on the 1893 and UM 3 maps, 
was the location of the town hall. It is not 
known when this ci)ngregation lokled. Ihe 
cluircli was named for a gro\e nearby (1885 
History. 64S). 

See also r'lm Cinne School 



34 



THE ELMS 

This is the name given to the County 
Farm in 1949. It has been used tor the county 
run nursing home ever since. 

See also County Farm. 

EMMET TOWNSHIP 

This is Congressional Township (iNorth 
and 3 West from the 4''' Principal Meridian. 
Peter Hale was the First settler in 1830 on the 
site of the present Wigwam Hollow or Old 
Macomb Cemetery. Spring Creek, the First 
settlement, was started by William Pennington 
in 1831. Spring Creek was also the original 
name of the township, but in 1856 the name 
changed to Emmet. The reason for the change is 
not known, unless to distinguish between the 
township and the thriving Spring Creek 
community. 

"Emmet" derives from Robert Emmet, a 
prominent Irish patriot executed by the British in 
1803. The name change reflected the approval 
and admiration Americans felt for the 1 9''^ 
Century European re\olutionaries who fought 
for democracy and independence. The choice of 
the name was probably influenced by many 
settlers of Irish descent in the township. 

See also Spring Creek (Settlement). 

EMMET TOWNSHIP TOWN HALL 

County maps of 1893 and 1913 show 
the building on the SW corner of Sec. 15. 
According to the Macomb .lournal , the hall was 
built in this location after considerable 
controversy and was preceded by another 
building "located east" (M.I 4/23/1891). The 
older site was probably the original school house 
of the McKee District which, according to 
Clarke, "was sold to the township for the 
purposes of holding therein election, town 
meetings, etc." (Clarke. 429). 

The town hall still stands. 

EMORY SCHOOL 

(No. 2, Prairie City Twp.; No. 2) 

This school was organized in 1856 
(Clarke, 421) and is shown in that year (RSR. 
173) and also in 1861. It was located on the SE 
comer of Sec. 4 in Prairie City Twp. The name 
derives from the Charles H. Emory family, 
owners of adjacent land. The school never 



changed its name. It consolidated into the 
Prairie City District in 1947 and the grounds 
were sold off in the same year (Deeds: 190/598). 

EPPERSON STATION or EPPERSON 
ELEVATORS 

This railroad stop was located on the St. 
Louis Division of the C.B. & Q. Railroad, 5 
miles south of Bushnell, on the south line of 
Sec. 22 in Mound Twp. The site was acquired 
by the railroad in 1872. The station consisted of 
an e.xtra spur with a passenger, cattle, and grain 
loading platform. It was named for James 
Harvey Epperson who was instrumental to 
bringing the railroad through the eastern part of 
the county. The station is shown on maps from 
1876 to 1946. 



EPWORTH CHAPEL 

See Adair Methodist 
Church. 



Episcopal 



ERIN, TOWN OF 

This was the early name for Chalmers 
Twp. Erin derives from Erend, the ancient 
legendary name for Ireland. 

See Chalmers Township. 

EVERGREEN POST OFFICE 

See Doddsville Post Office. 

EXCELSIOR SCHOOL 

(No. 7, Chalmers Twp.; No. 107) 

First known as Cover School for the 
George H. Cover family, this building was 
located on the NW corner of the SW quarter of 
Sec. 25. It is shown on all county maps from 
1871 on. The date of the school organization is 
not known. The name change probably occurred 
in 1908 when Rowena Andrews donated land 
(Deeds: 100/504), and the school became 
E.xcelsior after the Excelsior Stock Fami of J.T. 
Andrews, shown on the 1893 map. In later years 
the school was called Cline (Road, I), probably 
after the Kline family on v\hose land it was 
located (Pace). The school consolidated with 
the Ebenezer School District in .lune of 1947. 

"E.xcelsior" is Latin tor "higher." The 
name is always used in a commendatory way, 
meaninu "excellent." 



35 



EYRE'S SAWMILL 

This mill started in 1833 when Samuel 
McGee received permit to build a mill and dam 
on the NE quarter of Sec. 16 in Tennessee Twp. 
(Commissioners: Ayi37). In 1836 McGee is 
listed as "the rightful owner of the bed and both 
banks of the Drowning Fork of Crooked Creek 
at a place of Lot 7 being part of the 16' 
Section..." (Deeds: A/299). The same year 
McGee sold out to Preston Eyre (Deeds: 4/302) 
who ran the mill tor three years (MDJ, 
9/20/1905). Regardless of who ran the mill it 
retained the name of Eyre for two decades. In 
1851 Eyre's sawmill is shown on the SW quarter 
of Sec. 9 (RSR, 78). In 1856 Eyre sold the mill 
and the adjoining Sec. 16 "south of Crooked 
Creek" (Deeds: 3/432). but "Ayr's Mill" shows 
in 1861 on the east side of the NW quarter of 
Sec. 16, on the north side of Crooked Creek, 
now East Fork La Moine River. It is not known 
when the mill ceased to e.xist. The 1871 map 
does not show any mill in this location. 

See also Mills. 

Additional notes 



36 



F 



FAIRMOUNT SCHOOL 
(No. 3, Scotland Twp.; No. 92) 

Located on the SE comer of Sec. 6, this 
school was apparently built in 1<S58 when James 
Hunter deeded land to school directors (Deeds: 
6/223). The school is shown on all county maps 
starting in 1861, but the 1919 map calls it 
"Fairmont," It ceased to function in 1947 when 
it consolidated into the Scotland School District 
No, 94, 

"Fair" is an old word for beautiful. As 
such it is often combined with other nouns and 
used in a commendatory way. The site of the 
Faimiount School was on raised ground so the 
name probably denotes a pretty, elevated 
location. 

FAIRVIEW SCHOOL 

(No. 2, New Salem Twp.; No. 81) 

This school was located on the SE 
comer of Sec. 4. The first school building in 
this district was moved to the site in 1858 where 
it is shown in 1860 (School plats). A new 
building was erected in 1870 (Clarke, 419) on 
land donated by William Hall in 1871 (Deeds: 
31/200). The school remained on the site. The 
name already mentioned by Clarke (Clarke, 
419), probably reflects on the location. The 
school and the grounds were sold in 1948 (Adair 
W, B,, 4/1/1948; Deeds: 190/550). 

FAMILY CEMETERY 

This cemetery is supposed to have been 
located in Mound Twp., but nothing else is 
known about it. It is probably a cemetery better 
known under a different name, 

FANDON 

This village is located on the township 
line between Sec, 32 of Chalmers Twp, and Sec. 
5 of Bethel Twp, The plat, named Middleton, 
was filed on March 21. 1837 by John Patrick 
and James Edmonston (Mortgages: A/ 192), The 
name described the town's location as the 
midpoint stagecoach stop on the state road 
between Galesburg and Quincy. In the ISSOs the 



name Middletim changed to Fandoii, the new 
name for the local post oificc, but Middleton 
persisted in local usage well into the 1890s, 

For an explanation of the name 
"Fandon" sec Fandon Post Office, 

See also Forgottonia. 

FANDON CEMETERY 

See Gibson Cemetery No. 1, 

FANDON POST OFFICE 

This post ofTice was the successor to the 
Young Post Office, It was established on 
January 23, 1871 as Middleton with Alias 
Hatfield as postmaster. It seems that it was 
discontinued and again established on March 20. 
1876, this time as Fandiin. Locally the post 
office was called "Middleton" as late as 1898 
(Site). The functions were transferred to the 
Colchester Post OfTice on August 16, 1963. 

The name Fandon has been a local 
mystery because no contemporary newspaper 
recorded the name change. According to Illinois 
Place Names, there have been fourteen places 
called Middleton, and one also had a post office 
(p. 437). When McDonough County Middleton 
applied for the reinstatement of their post office 
in 1876, the U.S. Postal Department did not 
allow name duplication and people in Middleton 
had to come up with a new name, Fandon is 
most probably an invented name, possibly 
coined, but v\hat it represented, and who 
invented it, is unknown. It is a unique name, 
found in no dictionary of place names. 

FARM NAMES 

In 1901 and in 1915 the Illinois General 
Assembly passed laws allowing farmers to 
register their farms' names with the county 
recorder. These names are listed in the county 
clerk's register, and some show in the 1913 
county atlas. Many farmers, however, did not 
go through the official process which required a 
fee, but still called their farms by distinct names. 
One such widely advertised farm was 
Peonydale, The list of farm names follows 
(brackets indicate added information). 



37 



Buenavista 








Stock Farm 


MeDonough 


Twp. 


Cedar Lawn 
Farm 


Mrs. Hattie M. 
Griffith 


Bushnell 
Twp. 


Meadowbrook 
Farm 


Clarence 
Watson 


Macomb 
Twp. 


Cedar lawn 
Farm 


Amelia T. 
Window 


Tennessee 
Twp. 


Muskoday 


O.J. 
Geltmacher 


[Sciota Twp.] 


Chestnut 
Grove Stock 
Farm 


T. Dean 
Barclay 


Scotland 
Twp. 


Old Hickory 
Homestead 


Mrs. M.H. 
Walker 




Old 
Homestead 


Joseph L 
Thompson 


Hire Twp. 


Chicamauga 
Stock Farm 


[A.V. 
Brooking] 


Emmet Twp. 


Overhill Farm 


W.W. Hams 


Macomb 
Twp. 


Cloverdaie 
Farm 


Henry Chipman 


Eldorado 
Twp. 


Pioneer Stud 
Farm 


P.S.F. Truman 


Bushnell 
Twp. 


Cloverdaie 
Stock Farm 


Henry. .B. 
Welsh 


Sciota Twp. 


Pleasant Gale 
Stock Farm 


Raymond 
Ruebush 


Sciota Twp. 


Creekside 
Stock Farm 


J.H. Lindsey 


Macomb 
Twp. 


Prairie Hill 
Stock Farm 


David T. 
Hainline 


Sciota Twp. 


Deerpark 


M.C. Pollock 


Walnut 
Grove Twp. 


Prairie View 
Stock Farm 


Frank B. 
Kugler 


Mound Twp. 


Edgewood 


George W. 
Welch 


Colchester 
Twp. 


Quit Dale 
Farm 


C.E. Arwig 




Excelsior 
Stock Farm 


J.T. Andrews 


Chalmers 
Twp. 


Regal Poultry 
Farm 


Walter H. Hawk 




Fair Acres 


Mrs. Cordia 
M. Diehl 


Salem Twp. 


Sears Pure 
Bred Stock 
Farm 


Harold Sears 


[Eldorado 
Twp.] 


Fairview 


J.W. Wheeler 


Eldorado 
Twp. 


Fairview Farm 


C.C. Kinnett 


Hire Twp. 


Shadv Dell 


P.W. Moore 


[Mound Twp.] 


Fertile Acre 


R.T. Ballew 


Emmet Twp. 


Sleepy Hollow 


Carl H. Dunbar 




Forest Grove 
Farm 


W. L. 
Woodside 


Blandinsville 
Twp. 


Spring Dale 
Farm 


Thalus Huston 


Sciota Twp. 


Forest View 
Farm 


John Canote 


Colchester 
Twp. 


Spring Grove 
Farm 


J.W. Parkings 


Colchester 
Twp. 


Grand Prairie 


James A. 
Watson 


New Salem 
Twp. 


Spring Valley 
Farm 


J.F. Ellis 




Hawthorne 
Farm 


W.C. Patterson 


MacombTwp 


Suburban 
Farm 


J.O. Gardner 


New Salem 
Twp. 


Hickory (irove 
Farm 


J.D. Griffin 


Chalmers 
Twp. 


Twin Elm 
Farm 


J.A. Holt 


Tennessee 
Twp. 


Hill Drop 
Farm 


fLE. Graham 


Macomb 
Twp. 


Valley Spring 
Farm 


J.F Ellis 


Macomb 
Twp. 


Hills Grove 
Farmstead 


George W. 
Foley 


Tennessee 
Twp. 


Valley View 
Farm 


HA. Payne 


Lamoine Twp. 


Justamere 
Farm 


Harry D. Lant/ 


Walnut 
Grove Twp. 


Walnut (iro\e 
Stock Farm 


Reon D. Hicks 




Ken 1 in Farm 


W. L. Heberer 




Wayside Farm 


A. Chadderdon 




La Prairie 


Mrs. C.L. 
Hickman 


Macomb 
Tv\p. 


Woodside 
Farm 


L.R. Baumgartn 


Hire Twp. 


Maple Dell 
Farm 


Ethel McDill 


Macomb 
Twp. 










Maple Grove 


J.A. 


Colchester 







3S 



FARMER'S FORK 

Farmer's Fork is a tributary of the [-ast 
Fork La Moine River. It originates in Sec. 34 of 
Sciota Tvvp. and runs through Fmmet, Macomb, 
and Walnut Grove townships. It joins the East 
Fork in the NW comer of Sec. 18 of Mound 
Twp. 

FERSTER WOODS 

First called "The Jungle" and then 
"Amos Woods," this 30-acre tract of rough 
wooded land in the NE comer of the NW quarter 
of Sec. 23 in Macomb Twp. is known for its 
virgin tree stand. In 1985 the land was donated 
to Western Illinois University by Teresa Glazier 
(nee Ferster) to be used as a bird sanctuary. The 
name honors earlier owners (E. Benson). 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF BETHEL 
TOWNSHIP 

See Bethel Baptist Church. 

FLAT WOODS NEIGHBORHOOD 

An obituary for Fred Easley in the 
Macomb Daily Journal (2/21/1902, p. 3) 
contains the only reference to this name. 
A.M.B. Easley farm is shown on the 1893 and 
the 1912 maps in the S\V quarter of Sec. 31 in 
Eldorado Twp., which probably is the area 
mentioned, although according to local sources 
the Flat Woods Neighborhood is better known in 
Schuyler County (Grimm). The 1871 atlas map 
indicates timber growth on tlat land in the 
southwestem comer of Eldorado Twp. and 
adjacent Schuyler County. Such a combination 
of land feature and vegetative growth was 
unusual and would have occasioned distinct 
naming. 

FLINT HILLS 

Flint Hills is located on the SE quarter 
of Sec. 29 and the adjacent SW quarter of Sec. 
28 in Emmet Twp. (Pioneers, 1 14). The heavily 
wooded area is now an outlying suburb of 
Macomb northwest of the town. 

FOLSOM'S CORNER 

This is the NE comer of Sec. 21 ui 
Bushnell Twp., on the line separating Prairie 
City and Bushnell townships. It was named 
after I.Y. Folsom, a surveyor and author of the 



1861 map of McDonough County. The name 
appears in an 1864 deed record (Deeds: 22/41 1 ). 

FOREST LAWN MEMORY GARDENS 

This cemetery, located in the NE quarter 
of Sec. 3 in Chalmers Twp., is privately owned 
and is now the largest cemetery in the county. 
The first burial was in 1947. 

FORGOTTONIA 

This was the tongue-in-cheek name for 
part of west central Illinois promoted as the 
forthcoming 51" state of the Union. The 
fictitious state was to be formed by secession 
from the State of Illinois. The name and 
publicity that arose in 1973 stemmed from the 
local frustration at the lack of state funding for 
area highways. The capitol of this state was to 
be Fandon. the state emblem - the albatross, and 
the state flower - the forget-me-not. 

The name Forgottonia is attributed to 
Jack Mom, a dynamic Macomb businessman and 
then president of the Macomb Chamber of 
Commerce. 

FORT CLARKE 

This name, found only once, appeared in 
a note written by Mankin Champion in the 1835 
probate file No. 696 for Alexander Mayfield 
(Harris. M.). The note defines the place as "at 
head of Spring Creek." It is an affectionate and 
telling reference to James Clarke's large two- 
story log cabin built in 1835 on the NW quarter 
of Sec. 5 in Emmet Twp. Both Clarke and 
Champion emigrated from Kentucky, where 
two-story cabins, such as Clarke's, frequently 
served as protection from Indians. Furthermore, 
James Clarke is known to have had a large 
family with many sons, so the term probably 
reflected local perception of the homestead. 
Like "Old Fort" in Industry Twp., "Fort Clarke" 
suggests a history of confrontations with the 
Indians, which the settlers from Kentucky 
brought with them to McDonough County. 

FOSTER CEMETERY 

See New Hope Cemetery. 



39 



FOSTER POINT CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the SE 
comer of the NE quarter of Sec. 2 in Eldorado 
Twp. and was part of the Foster's Point 
settlement. The cemetery started in the 1830s as 
the family burial plot. It contains the grave of 
Jonas Hobart, a veteran of the Revolutionary 
War. An 1860 gift of land from Samuel Foster 
transferred the ownership to the people of 
McDonough County (Deeds; 32/554). The 
cemetery is still in use. 

FOSTER or FOSTERS POINT 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

This congregation held meetings at the 
residence of A.J. Foster as early as 1836. It 
formally organized in 1857 and built a sanctuary 
in 1866 on land donated to the "Sugar Creek 
Cumberland Presbyterian Church" by members 
of the Foster family (Deeds: 18/309). The 
building was located on the SE comer of the SW 
quarter of Sec. 2 in Eldorado Twp.. where it 
appears on all contemporary maps. After 
Cumberland Presbyterian churches united with 
the Presbyterian Church USA in 1907, the 
church was called Foster Point Presbyterian 
Church, as it appeared on the 1919 map of the 
county. The property was sold in 1942 by the 
Presbytery of Rushville( Deeds: 175/142). 

See also Eldorado Tup. 

FOSTER POINT SCHOOL 

(No. 1, Eldorado Twp.; No. 150) 

"Powers School House" was an early 
school in Eldorado Twp. (Powers, 50). Its 1837 
location was probably on Sec. I on land 
belonging to Abraham Powers, an early settler m 
the Foster Point neighborhood, so the school is 
the predecessor of the Foster Pomt School. A 
gift of land by Thomas Berry in 1864 (Deeds: 
52/522) placed the school on the NE comer of 
Sec. 11. In the 194()s this school seems Ui have 
relocated to tiie SE corner of the SW quarter of 
Sec. 2 where it is shown on contemporary maps. 
It was sometimes called "Foster School," and 
was sold Ml 1950 (Adan W. B., 12/21/1950). 

FOSTER SC MOOI.dlire lup ) 
.See IMcasanl View School. 



FOSTER SCHOOL (Eldorado Twp.) 
See Foster Point School. 

FOSTER'S BRANCH 

Macomb Daily Journal of 1903 
mentions the building of a bridge o\er a creek 
by this name located in Lamoine Twp.. but no 
other information could be found. 

FOSTER'S MILL 

See Pleasant Valley Mill. 

FOSTER'S POINT 

This neighborhood at the head of Sugar 
Creek in the NE comer of Eldorado Township 
was named for the family of Arthur J. Foster 
who settled in the area in 1831. Peck called this 
population cluster "Foster's Settlement." 

"Point" was the name frequently used to 
designate timber at the head of prairie 
watercourses. In these locations tree growth 
jutted above the surrounding prairie and was 
visible from great distances providing much 
needed orientation to early tra\elers. The origin 
of the name is from the French "pointe." French 
explorers measured distances on the river by 
bends of the stream as indicated by protmding 
points or arms, but the word was used apparently 
for wooded points only (McDermott, 1941). 

FOUR CORNERS 

This was a neighborhood in Macomb 
Twp. centering on Mt. Solon School (Genealogy 
12:1/612). No reason could be found for this 
naming. 

FRANCIS READING MILL 

See Langford's House Mill. 

FRANKLIN CENTENARV METHODIST 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

This church started with an 1866 gift of 
land iVoni Luther Johnson located on the SE 
quarter o[' Sec. 26 in Sciota Twp. (Deeds: 
18 196). The church was built the same year 
(Peter, p. 204) hut it was soon afterwards mined 
to Milan and renameil Milan Melluidist 
Episcopal (lunch. When Milan and Shcrulan 
united to fiMin (iood lloite the church became 
the llniled Methodist C'iiuich of C iood Hope. 



40 



FRANKLIN SCHOOL 

See Tank School. 

FREE METHODIST CHURCH OF 
MT. ZION 

See Mt. Zion Church. 

FREEMAN COAL MINE 

Located in central and eastern Bethel 
and the adjoining Industry' townships and 
operating since 1982, this is the only existing 
coal strip mine in the county. It is owned and 
run by the Freeman United Coal Mining 
Company. 

See also Coal mines. 

FRIEND GRAVE 

This single grave site, located on the 
NW quarter of the SW quarter of Sec. 20 in 
Lamoine Twp., is the burial site of Elizabeth 
Friend, on what used to be the family farm. 
Other members of the Friend family are buried 
in Gibson Cemetery No. 1 (Cemeteries: 3/41 ). 

FRIENDSHIP CEMETERY 

The land deed for the NW corner of the 
NE quarter of the NW quarter of Sec. 5 in 
Tennessee Twp. was issued by Dotson Seybold 
to tiie Methodist Episcopal Church in 1839 
(Deeds: 0/415). The cemetery is marked on all 
maps of the county starting in 1871, and is still 
in use. George W. Hire, a veteran of the War of 
1812 for whom Hire Twp. is named, is buried 
here, as are tlve children of Jefferson Hire, his 
son. The children were all victims of a typhoid 
epidemic in 1852-53. The western part is called 
Mourning Cemetery because it contains many 
graves of the Mourning family. 

FRIENDSHIP CHURCH or FRIENDSHIP 
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

This church was first located on the NW 
comer of the NE quarter of Sec. 5 in Tennessee 
Twp., east from the cemetery, where it is shown 
on the 1861 map. This was the site of the first 
camp meeting in the Military Tract held by Peter 
Cartwright in 1833. The Methodist fellowship 
started the same year is considered the oldest 
religious organization in the county. Early 
services were held in the Prentiss schooihouse. 
The first church building was built in 185! on 



the north side of the NW quarter of Sec. 5 west 
from the cemetery. The lumic was chosen to 
signify that disagreements which arose at the 
time of the building had been settled. I'he 
church was rebuilt in 1889, and burned m 1^3 I. 
After that it was again rebuilt and was active 
until 2006. 

The presence of a church, a cemetery, a 
post otfice and a scIk>o1 indicated a sizeable 
population cluster. Friendship Neighborhood 
was located on the early state road leading from 
Macomb to Carthage. 

FRIENDSHIP POST OFFICE 

This post ol'llce was the successor to the 
Worchester I'ost Office m the same 
neighborhood. It was established July 14, 1849 
with postmaster Milton T. Hunt, and was 
discontinued on July 9, 1866. It is marked on 
Morse's 1854 map of Illinois and on Worthen's 
1875 geological map of the state, e\en though 
by that time it had not functioned for a number 
of years. The latter map shows the post office on 
Sec. 6 in Tennessee Twp., west from the church 
and the cemetery. 

See also Worchester Pt)st Office. 

FROG POND SCHOOL (Hire Twp ) 
See Sunny Side School. 

FROG POND SCHOOL 

(No. 3, New Salem Twp; No.82) 

According to the 1885 history, this 
school was erected in 1855. It was first located 
on the NE corner of Sec. 7 where it is shown in 
1860 (School plats). Sometime before 1871 it 
was relocated to the SI: corner of Sec. 6, where a 
new building was built in 1883 (1885 History, 
924). No land deeds could be located to \erlfy 
the dates. The school was so named because at 
first it was located on flat land where water 
pooled and "frogs chirped." The fields were later 
tiled (1976 History, 38). The school was 
consolidated into the Adair School District in 
1947, and the building and grounds sold in 1948 
(Adair W. B., 4/1/1948; Deeds: 190/544). 

FROG POND SC HOOL (Sciota Twp ) 
See East Railroad School. 



41 



G 



GALENA ROAD 

First called "Lead Mine Road," later 
"Old Mine Road" and "Old Galena Road," this 
trail led tVom the Illinois River at Beard's Ferry, 
now Beardstown, via Fort Armstrong, now Rock 
Island, to Galena. It was laid out in 1827 by the 
Schuyler county surveyor J.D. Manlove and 
Thomas Beard in order to facilitate travel to the 
lead-mining region around Galena. The trail 
was used extensively, and in October of 1830 it 
was declared a state road. This was the route 
followed by the young Lieutenant Abraham 
Lincoln on his way to Yellow Banks to fight in 
the Black Hawk War (Hallwas, 1984/7). 
Initially, the trail entered McDonough County 
through Sec. 36 of Industry Twp., passed 
through Roger's, later Carter's Settlement, then 
angled northeastward. In 1850, with the 
diminished importance of Carter's Settlement, 
the trail followed roughly the line between 
Range 1 and 2 West to the border of Warren 
County. Road Survey Records indicate work on 
this road as late as 1856, at which time it was 
called Rushville-Galena Road. 

See also Rock Bridge. 

CALLETT CREEK 

This creek which flows through sections 
2 and I of Prairie City Twp. is a tributary of 
Cedar Creek in northwest Fulton County. The 
damming of (iallett Creek formed Lake Sur- 
prise, which was located west of Prairie City. 

See also Lake Surprise. 

GATES or (;ATES AND DOVLES MILL 

See Lamoine Mills. 

(;e()R(;et()\vn 

lliis is a subiliN isioii otMacomb localcil 
on the Sf i.|uarter of Sec. 34 in I'mniel Iwii.. 
west ollhe town. 

(;erman baptisi ( eme i ern 

See l)unk;inl ( cnicterv. 



GERMAN BAPTIST BRETHREN 
CHURCHES 

See Bushnell Arm of the German 
Baptist Church, Camp Creek Church, and Spring 
Run Baptist Church. 

GERMAN CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 

(Bethel Twp.) 

See Camp Creek Church. 

GERMAN LUTHERAN CHURCH OF 
MACOMB TOWNSHIP 

See Mt. Pisgah Evangelical Lutheran 
Church. 

GERMAN METHODIST CHURCH 

A church by this name is mentioned 
only once (MDJ, 9/19/1898, p. 3). It was 
located in Hire Twp. It might have been an 
alternate name for Willow Grove Church. 

GIBSON CEMETERY NO. 1 

This cemetery is also called Fandon 
Cemetery. It is located on the NE comer of Sec. 
6 in Bethel Twp. The name comes from John 
and Nancy Gibson who in 1859 sold land to 
"trustees of a public grave yard" (Deeds: 6/165; 
16/80). John Gibson is reported to ha\e been 
the first settler in Bethel Twp. The earliest 
recorded burials in the 1840s were members of 
the Gibson family. 

GIBSON CEMETERY NO. 2 

See White Flock Cemetery. 

GIN rid(;e 

Gin Ridge is the best known oi' four 
parallel ridges running through the county. It is 
an c!c\alion in Bethel Twp. between Cirindstone 
Creek and Camp Creek, and is designated by 
that name on most USGS maps of the area. It 
seems that an earl\- road between Quincv and 
Peoria ran along this relati\el\ high ground. 

the origin of the name is cloaked m 
local folklore. Some say that the ridge was 
named lor a keg oi' gin that was stolen when a 
sletl at a wagon ot an earh Birmingham 
storekeeper broke down and he hail to leave it 
behind to seek help .Aiuither story relates that a 
keg ol gill was sit4en In a \oung tra\eler. and 
\cl aiiolher tiial uiii was stolen In a hand of 



gypsies. A more plausible explanation is that 
the ridge was overgrown with juniper or "gin" 
berries, which were used to flavor locally- 
produced liquor. The ridge's association with 
alcoholic beverage, real or imagined, combined 
with the fact that the area was poor tarm land 
and was settled by "Southemers," known to 
have distilled liquor. All this led to an image of 
Gin Ridge as a culturally backward, lawless area 
with vague geographic perimeters. Democratic 
political orientation of the Gin Ridge clashed 
with the professed progressive aspirations and 
Republican orientation of the rest of the county. 
Thus, Gin Ridge became not only a place but 
also a way of life. In local usage "Gin Ridger," 
is a person who is fearlessly independent, and 
slightly unreliable, and Gin Ridge a place that 
nobody wants to claim as home. "It is one of the 
most fascinating place names in the county." 
(Hallwas. 1984, 57-63). 

Shadwick in his history claims that Gm 
Ridge was also called Center Ridge (Shadwick, 
25), but this is a mistake. USGS maps locate 
Center Ridge south of Gin Ridge in Schuyler 
County. 

GIN RIDGE CEMETERY 

Lost to contemporary local memory, this 
burying ground was discovered by the Freeman 
United Coal Mining Company while surveying 
land slated to be strip-mined. The cemetery was 
located in Bethel Twp. on the NW quarter of the 
SW quarter of the NW quarter of Sec. 25 and the 
adjoining part of the NE quarter of Sec. 26. 
When discovered, it proved to have been known 
as Gunning or Irish Cemetery. The cemetery 
contained markers for members of the McCoy 
family from Ireland, the Charles Monies or 
Monetee family, and the Gunning family. The 
latter were listed as owners of the north half of 
Sec. 26, but no land deed for the cemetery could 
be located leading to the conclusion that this was 
a private family cemetery. Most interments 
were in the 1840s and the 1850s. After 
notifying existing descendents, the remains were 
removed and reburied in the old Macomb 
Cemetery and in the nearby Stoneking 
Cemetery. 

GIN RIDGE SCHOOL 

See Mt. Zion School. 



"GLADE CITY" 

This is the nickname for Blandinsville, 
used especially in the early 20 ' century. 
According to Webster a glade is "an open 
passage through a wood; a grassy open or 
cleared space in a forest." Blandinsville is 
located on a ridge between upper Little Creek 
and Baptist Creek, both of which must have 
been heavily forested. The word "glade" also 
has a romantic connotation meaning an open 
moonlit space, so the name may have been 
chosen as a commendatory description of the 
town. 

GLADE CITY CEMETERY 

Located on the SW comer of the NW 
quarter of Sec. 33 in Blandinsville Twp., this 
cemetery is now the main cemetery for the town 
of Blandinsville. It started as a private burial 
plot for the Blandin family, with the first burial 
in 1840. In 1887 Charles Blandm sold the 
grounds to town trustees (Deeds: 61/404) and in 
1888 the cemetery was platted (Plats: 2/63). At 
first it was known as North Cemetery, to 
distinguish it from the South or New Hope 
Cemetery located just south of town. 

See also New Hope Cemetery. 

GOOD HOPE 

This town grew from two independently 
platted towns, Sheridan and Milan, and is an 
example of the frenzied land speculation 
attendant to the construction of railroad lines 
through the county. On July 3, 1867 J.E. Morris 
platted a town on the NE quarter of Sec. 31 in 
Walnut Grove Twp. and named it Sheridan 
(Plats: 1/86). The town site was influenced by 
the recently completed survey of the Mississippi 
and Wabash Railroad. Already in 1861 he had 
land dealings with the railroad company trying 
to affect the location of the rail road station. 
One week later, on July 10. 1867, William 
Blandin, a relative of the founder of 
Blandinsville, laid out a few blocks west from 
Sheridan on the SE comer of Sec. 25 in Sciota 
Twp. and called it Milan (Plats: 1/98-99). He 
too had land transactions with the railroad in 
1861. Locally the two plats were christened 
"Morristown" and "Blandintown" (Road, 20). 

A post office called "Goodhopc" had 
been established in the area in 1858, and when 



43 



the two municipalities incorporated on March 3, 
1869 (Plats: 2/99), it was under the name of 
Good Hope. The rivalry between the two 
original plats is still evident in the 1871 atlas of 
the county where Sheridan and Milan are listed 
as separate entities in the town of Good Hope. 
See also Good Hope Post Office. 

GOOD HOPE CEMETERY 

This municipal cemetery is located north 
of town, on the SW comer of the NW quarter of 
Sec. 30 in Walnut Grove Twp. It was platted in 
1878 on land purchased from Benjamin Murphy 
(Plats: 2/64). 

GOOD HOPE POST OFFICE 

This post office is the successor to an 
earlier post office in the vicinity by the name of 
Hawthorne. Goodhope Post Office was 
established on April 21. 1858 with postmaster 
David J. Dugan who resided on the north half of 
the SE quarter of Sec. 25 in Sciota Township. 
William F. Blandin who resided in Sec. 36 of 
Sciota Twp., became the postmaster in the early 
1 860s. According to Illinois Place Names , the 
original form "Goodhope" was changed to 
"Good Hope" on January 1, 1881, but a post 
office spelled "Good Hope" is already recorded 
on May 16. 1877 when David Campbell became 
the postmaster. The town, which took its name 
from the post office, has always been spelled 
"Good Hope." 

See also Hawthorne Post Office. 

GOOD HOPE SCHOOL (Sciota Twp ) 
See lank School. 

GOOD HOPE SCHOOI, 

(No. 9, Walnut (;rovc Iwp.; No. IX) 

Ihis school was erected in 1861. The 
1871 map of the county shows it on the SW 
corner t)f the NW quarter of Sec. 30. At the time 
the school was a union school of Walnut Cirove 
and Sciota townships. The school was mo\ed to 
(he town of Good Hope m 1874 (Clarke. 430). 

(;()()SENE( KS( HOOE 

(No. 2, ( halmcrs Twp.; No. 101) 

All maps of the county starling in 1871 
show this sciuu4 on the west side of the NW 
quarter of See. 3. l^ul no clecil lor ihe school 



grounds in this location could be found. 
However, a land deed for part of the north half 
of the SW quarter of Sec. 3 was executed in 
1862 by Tillman L. Bowen. one of the school 
directors of District No. 6 (Deeds: 13 227). The 
school was a well-known landmark on the 
Macomb-Carthage Road. The grounds passed 
into private hands in 1948 (Deeds: 206/13). 

It is said that the name "Gooseneck" 
derived from a sharp curve of the road. This is 
the only known name for this school. 

GRAHAM MILL 

This mill was mentioned in 1838 in a 
request for a road from "Middleton to Graham's 
Mill" (Commissioners: B/35). "Graham Mill" is 
probably a misspelled entry for Grave's Mill, 
better known as McDonough's Mill. 

GRANT 

See New Philadelphia. 

GRAVES MILL 

See McDonough's Mill. 

GREEN ACRES 

This is a small Macomb subdivision 
located on the south side of the SE quarter of 
Sec. 18 in Macomb Twp. 

GREENWOOD CHURCH 

Greenwood Church was a Methodist 
Episcopal congregation started m 1857 at 
Scottsburg Church. The congregation first 
worshipped in Scottsburg and then in the Mt. 
Solon schoolhouse and in tiie .lerusalem Chapel 
until 1875. when it built a sanctuary on the NW 
corner of See. 2 in Macomb Twp. (1885 History, 
449). The church is shown only on the 1913 and 
the 1919 maps of the county. Services were 
discontinued in 1911. No deeds were found to 
verify dates. It seems that this church was al one 
time called Mt. Solon (I97(-. History. 35). 

ihe name "Greenwootr' is often used as 
a coniineiulalorv expression, but since both the 
ehurcii .md the school were located near heavily 
wooded slopes oi creeks. Ihe name most 
probaiil\ rellecled on Ihe location. 

See also Scoltsburu School. 



44 



GREENWOOD SCHOOL 

See Scottsburg School. 

GRINDSTONE CHURCH 

This Cumberland Presbyterian 

congregation organized in 1 843 and built its 
house of worship in 1845. The site was east of 
Industry in what was called Vance's Settlement 
next to Vance's Cemetery on Sec. 24 in Industry 
Twp. The church was probably built on private 
land since no deeds could be located. In 1857 a 
new church building was erected in the town of 
Industry and renamed Industry Cumberland 
Presbyterian Church (Peter, 95). 

GRINDSTONE CREEK 

This stream flows in westerly direction 
through Industry and Bethel townships to join 
Camp Creek at the north border of Sec. 31 in 
Bethel Twp. 

The creek was known by several names, 
the earliest being "Dove Creek," so called in 
1832 (Commissioners: A/90) and in an 1835 
land deed for the NE quarter of Sec. 16 in 
Industry Twp (Deeds; B/393). But already in 
1835, commissioners authorized a bridge over 
"Grandstone," (Commissioners, A/216), later 
"Groundstone." In 1837 Peck's Gazetteer calls 
the stream "Grindstone Fork." In 1851 

Grindstone Creek upstream from Carter Creek is 
called Dailey Creek (RSR, 83) probably because 
the creek flowed through Dailey family land in 
Sec. 1 of Industry Twp. In the same year a north 
tributary of Carter Creek is called "North Branch 
Grindstone" (RSR, 72), which was probably a 
mistake. 

Local lore has it that the name 
"Grindstone" was given by a party of men from 
Schuyler County, but this could not be 
confirmed. Clarke's history says that there was 
"an excellent quality of stone near Industry on 
Grindstone Creek" (Clarke, 282), but there is no 
evidence that the stone from the creek bed was 
used for milling purposes, although the fine- 
grained sandstone could have been used for 
grinding and sharpening tools. 

GRINDSTONE POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on 
September 27, 1853 with postmaster Lpiphalet 
P. Munson, who lived on the SW quarter of 



Sec. 8, Industry Twp. The post office closed on 
November 25, 1856, its function probably taken 
over by the Industry Post Office. 

GUINEA 

The area known by this name is located 
mostly in northwest Brooklyn Twp. in Schuyler 
County, but the very southwest comer of Bethel 
Twp. also seems to have been viewed as part of 
the Guinea neighborhood. 

GUINEA ISLAND 

The densely timbered SE quarter of Sec. 
14 in Macomb Twp. is a low-lying area of the 
former, now dry, bed of the East Fork La Moine 
River. It is said that it was named for a black 
man called McGinnes who lived there during the 
Civil War (Toland), but this could not be 
confirmed. The 1919 USGS map of the county 
clearly shows an island in the East Fork La 
Moine River. Later maps do not. 

GUINEA ISLAND SCHOOL 

The 1859 plats of McDonough County 
school districts show south halves of sections 
13, 14, and 15 in Macomb Twp. as District No. 
3 (School plats). But the district probably did 
not exist very long. Clarke does not mention it, 
and no school building is shown in this location 
on any map. The only deed that indicates a 
school connection is an 1861 deed from Charles 
Hays to trustees of township 7N3W which is 
Walnut Grove. The deed was for I 'A acre on the 
NW corner of the SE quarter of Sec. 14 (Deeds: 
8/573). No other information could be located. 

GUNNING CEMETERY 

See Gin Ridge Cemetery. 

GUY CEMETERY 

Located near the NE comer of Sec. 20 in 
Emmet Twp., Guy Cemetery started in 1849 as a 
family plot with the burial of George G. Guy's 
son. On February 26, 1870, George G. Guy 
donated the two acre plot to the Pleasant View 
Church to be used as cemetery (Deeds: 42/418). 
Most burials were members of the Guy and 
Joshua Simmons families (Harris, M.) The 
cemetery is also known as Pleasant View 
Cemetery. 



45 



GUY CHAPEL or CHURCH 

This church was known by three names. 
The congregation organized in 1 85 1 as Pleasant 
View Methodist Episcopal Church. In the 
beginning meetings were held in the Pleasant 
View School house, located two miles southeast 
(Crabb). In 1866 George G. Guy donated land 
(Deeds: 20/77), and in 1867 a sanctuary was 
built on the NE comer of Sec. 19 m Emmet 
Twp. Some time after, the church was renamed 
Maple Grove Methodist Episcopal Church, 
because of the presence of soft maple trees along 
the east fence (Pioneers, 322). In later years the 
church was commonly called "Guy Chapel" for 
George G. Guy, the first superintendent of the 
Sunday school. The church is shown on all 
county maps from 1871 to 1913. It is believed 
that services were held until 1943. The building 
was sold at auction in 1946. 

GUY SCHOOL 

See Oak Grove School (Emmet Twp.). 

Additional Notes 



4(> 



H 



HAGAN SCHOOL 

(No. 4, Chalmers Twp.; No. 104) 

This school was first located on tlie east 
side of the SW quarter of Sec. 20 on land 
donated in 1848 by Francis Lipe (Deeds: L/561 ). 
It relocated in 1897 to the NW corner of the NE 
quarter of Sec. 20 onto land deeded by James L. 
Hagan (Deeds: 78/430). The school stayed in 
this location until its closure. The grounds were 
sold off in 1956 (Deeds: 239/363). 

This school was also known as West 
Chalmers. 

HAGAN'S SAWMILL 

This mill on Sugar Creek is shown in 
1848 between sections 35 and 36 in Fldorado 
Twp., near the Quincy-Vermont Road (RSR, 38. 
39). The name comes from James C. Hagan. 
who purchased the NW quarter of the NW 
quarter of Sec. 36 in 1847, and was listed as a 
miller in the 1850 U.S. Census. It is not known 
when the mill ceased operation. 

HAGEMAN GRAVEYARD 

See Lynn Grove Cemetery. 

MAINLINE CEMETERY 

See Head Graveyard. 

HAINLINE SCHOOL 

See West Railroad School. 

HALF WAY HOUSE (Bushnell Twp.) 

According to the Bushnell centennial 
publication (Bushnell), this was a resting place 
for travelers and horses on the stage coach road 
to Rock Island and was located three and one 
half miles west from Bushnell. More recent 
information places the Half Way House just 
south of Bushnell (Hood) on what was probably 
the old Galena Trail, but this could not be 
confirmed. 



HALFWAY HOUSE (Emmet Twp.) 

This was the name given to the Stickle 
family house located on the SW quarter of Sec. 
1 1 in Emmet Twp. According to the Stickle 
family tradition, Abram Stickle, allowed 
teamsters to camp nearby on his property on the 
Burlington Road. In the 1830s and 1840s a 
taveni just west of the Stickle fami house was 
operated by Samuel Humberd (Harris, M.) 
Samuel Humberd, age 51 in 1850, indeed owned 
land northwest from Abram Stickle, but whether 
he also operated a hostelry could not be verified. 
This name for the Stickle house persisted well 
into the 20" Century. 

See also Stickle Cemetery. 

HAMILTON CEMETERY 

See Walnut Grove Cemetery. 

HAMILTON SCHOOL 

(No. 8, Walnut Grove Twp.; No. 17) 

The earliest school in the neighborhood 
existed already in 1850 and was located on the 
SW quarter, but when the district consolidated 
with District No. 3 of Macomb Twp. to form a 
union district, the school site relocated to the 
east side of the SE quarter of Sec. 32. The land 
for the new school was deeded in 1870 by David 
Brockway, who was one of the school directors 
(Deeds: 29/402). The site is well marked on all 
county maps. The name probably honors Levi 
Hamilton, a prominent pioneer of the area. A 
land deed conveyed the school grounds from 
trustees to W.E. Hamilton in 1955 (Deeds: 
215/512). 

HAMMER BRANCH 

See Argylc Hollow. 

HAMMER MILL 

This mill was located in New Salem 
Twp. around IS50. William Hammer, age 55, is 
listed as miller in the 1850 Census. The exact 
location of the mill could not be established, but 
it must have been part of the Pennington Point 
neighborhood. This was probably a steam- or a 
horse-powered mill. 



47 



HANMAN'S GROVE 

This grove was located on the East Fork 
La Moine River just north of Macomb. It was a 
site used by Macomb citizens for recreation, but 
there is no present day knowledge about it. 

HANSON SCHOOL 

(No. 5, Mound Twp.; No. 79) 

This school, also known as Pleasant 
View School, was first built in 1858 near the 
SW comer of Sec. 30 (Clarke, 975), where it 
appears on the 1861 map. In 1862 the school 
was moved and in 1869 rebuilt on the SE comer 
of Sec. 30 on land deeded by Lyman Porter in 
1870 (Deed: 37/384). The 1871 map shows the 
building on the SW comer of Sec. 29, which is 
probably a mistake. The school ceased operation 
in 1947 when it consolidated with the Bardolph 
School District. The grounds were sold the 
same year (McDonough C. T., 7/31/1947: 
Deeds: 206/54). 

The name comes from A. Hanson v\ho 
was the owner of the SE quarter of Sec. 30 in 
1893 and 1913. 

HARD SCRABBLE or HARDSCRABBLE 
SCHOOL (No. 9, Blandinsville Twp.; No. 37) 

This school was located on the NE 
corner of the SE quarter of Sec. 29. The school 
is well marked on all maps starting with 1871, 
but no land deed, or date of organization could 
be found. It closed in 1946. 

The meaning of "hardscrabble" is 
somewhat vague, coming from "scramble" or 
"scrape." The former is applied to land hard to 
scramble over, meaning broken ground or rank 
growth of \egetatii>n. fhe second meaning is 
applied to a hard place to scrape out a li\ing. 
I his latter usage of the word was connnon. and 
was esiiecially used m the 19" Century. 
(Placenames) . As an acljective, "hardscrabble" 
means barren. impt)\ ensiled or margmal. 
Schools so named probably unhealed poor 
finances or a scanty lunnber ot children m 
attendance. According to Clarke, the building of 
District No. 9 was built lor only $300, while the 
adjacent school m H!aiulins\ ille cost SI 0.000 
[i.e. $ 1.0001 (Clarke. 433-434). 



HARD SCRABBLE SCHOOL (Emmet Twp ) 
Two schools in Emmet Twp. are said to 

have been called by this unfortunate name. 

See Brick Yard School and Yard 

School. 

HARLAN HORSE MILL 

This early mill was located on the NE 
quarter of Sec. 1, in Industry Twp. It was 
established in 1835 (1885 History, 731), or 1834 
(MJ 8/27/1926). The name is after Wesley 
Harlan, an early settler in the township. 

HARMONY SCHOOL 

(No. 1, Chalmers Twp.; No. 100) 

According to Clarke (p. 818) this school 
was located on the SE quarter of Sec. 1, but the 
1871 and the 1903 atlases show it on the SE 
comer of the N W quarter of Sec. I . During that 
time and even somewhat later the school was 
called Blackburn School afier Alexander 
Blackbum who owned land on which the school 
was located. No deeds could be found to 
establish the starting date nor the e.xact location. 
In 1889 a land deed from B. Walker to school 
trustees (Deeds: 64/620) placed the school on 
the east side of the NE quarter of Sec. 1 1, where 
it remained until its closure. The grounds were 
sold in 1952 (Deeds: 206 502). 

This school was located onl\ one mile 
from the already existing Oakwood School, so 
Its name may imply that the establishment of the 
new district was not contested. 

See also (lakwood School. 

HARMONY SCHOOL (Macomb Twp.) 
See Maguire School. 

HARRINGTON MILI 

See Pleasant X'alley Mill 

HARRIS CEMETER^ 

I ocated on the Nl- corner of Sec. 1 in 
I Idorado Twp., this cemeter\ started in 1848 
with .lames Harris donating two acres of land 
"for the purpose of a public bur\ ing ground for 
llie neighborhood" (Deeils: M 142). Three more 
acres were adiled in I9()M. .lames Harris, Sr., 
was fretiuentU referred to as "1 alher Harris." He 
sellled in 1S32 on Sec 1 ,iihI w.is a highly 
regarded Innersalisl preacher. 



4S 



HARRIS FAMILY CEMETERY 

This family burying plot is located on 
the NE quarter of Sec. 22 in Macomb Twp. The 
cemetery is not marked on maps, but the 
location was part of the Alexander Harris land 
holdings. 

HARRIS SCHOOL 

See Creston Glade School. 

HARVEY SCHOOL 

(No. 7, Eldorado Twp.; No, 156) 

The earliest location of this school is on 
the NE comer of Sec. 26, as shown in I S6 1 . An 
1857 gift of land from William Summerwell to 
District No. 6 was probably the date of 
construction (Mortgages: H/539). In 1876 the 
district reorganized and Joseph Smith deeded 
land on the south side of the SW quarter of Sec. 
25 (Deeds: 53/566 and 53/567) where the school 
appeared on all later maps. It consolidated into 
Eldorado School District # 154 m 1947. The 
first school site was sold olT in 1949 (Deeds: 
206/77), and the latter in 1947 (Deeds: 190/613). 

The name was after Frank O. Harvey, 
one of the early school directors. 

HAWTHORNE POST OFFICE 

Established on November 6, 1855, this 
post office lasted only until ,luly 9, 1857. The 
post master was William F. Blandin who lived 
just west from Good Hope. The post office was 
reestablished less than a year later as Goodhope. 

The name probably derives from 
hawthorn, a native Illinois tree. 

See also Good Hope Post Office. 

HAYNES SCHOOL 

See Union School (No. I, Emmet Twp.: 
No. 5 1 ). 

HAYS CEMETERY 

This family cemetery is located on the 
NW quarter of the NE quarter of Sec. 3 in Hire 
Twp. The cemetery is named for Jefferson Hays 
who settled on Sec. 2 in 1832. The Hays or 
Hayes families formed a settlement in the 
neighborhood in the 1830s (Clarke, 545). The 
cemetery is mentioned in the Road Survey 
Records as beinu on the road from Macomb Ui 



Job's Settlement. Interments date back to 1842. 
The cemetery is not shown on maps. 

HAYS or HAYES SCHOOL 

See Pleasant View School (Hire Twp.). 

HEAD CEMETERY 

See Spring Creek Cemetery. 

HEAD GRAVEYARD 

This family cemetery is located on the 
NE comer of Sec. 6 in Emmet Twp. on land 
settled by James and Isabella Head in 1832. The 
grave of Susan, their daughter is the oldest 
headstone, dated 1836. This cemetery was first 
known as llainline Cemetery because it was a 
private burial ground for the llainline family 
(1885, 693), but most llainline graves were 
subsequently moved to the Spring Creek 
Cemetery. The cemetery is shown on county 
maps from 1S71 to 1913. 

HEAD SCHOOL 

See West Railroad School. 

HERON or HERRON CEMETERY 

Located on the NE quarter of the SW 
quarter of Sec. 9 in Emmet Twp., this is a family 
burial plot not marked on any maps. Ale.x G. 
Herron acquired the property in 1852. It is not 
known who is buried here. 

HIAWATHA SCHOOL 

(No. 4, Walnut Grove Twp.; No. 13) 

This school is first shown on the 1861 
map and is located on the NW comer of Sec. I 7. 
After redistricting in 1 863 the school was moved 
one mile south to the NE corner of Sec. 19, 
where it is shown on the 1871 atlas map. It was 
then known as "lliwassie." In 1873 the school 
was moved across the section line to the SE 
comer of Sec. 18, where "School District No. 4" 
purchased land from J. A. Brown (Deeds: 
34 182). The school remained in this location 
until its closure in the 1950s. In 1919 it is called 
"Browns School," and in 1940 "Hiawatha." It is 
by this latter name that the school was known 
until its consolidation into the Northwestern 
Community District. 



49 



In North Carolina and Tennessee 
"hewassee" is Cherokee for meadow 
(Placenames), and it is by that name that Clarke 
calls the school district (p. 1038). Hewassee is 
also a tributary of the Tennessee River. With 
time this school name became irrelevant and was 
replaced by "Browns." When "Browns" lost its 
significance, the early name of "Hiwassee" was 
changed into the more familiar "Hiawatha." The 
change was probably less in honor of Hiawatha, 
the Algonquin deity, but rather in reference to 
the famous Longfellow poem, "The Song of 
Hiawatha," which was at that time the standard 
recital piece for school children. 

See also Hickory Grove School (Walnut 
Grove Twp.) 



This cemetery was also known as 
Sorghum Grove Cemetery and "Old Hickory 
Graveyard" {MDJ, 12/10/1900, p.3). One 
reference called the cemetery and the church 
"Sugar Grove" probably referring to sorghum, 
but this name use could not be \ erified. 

HICKORY GROVE CHURCH 

See Shiloh Presbyterian Church. 

HICKORY GROVE CORNER 

This is an old name for the intersection 
of the present county roads 300N and 1 lOOE in 
Bethel Twp. at the SE comer of Sec. 14. This 
was the neighborhood of the East Bethel Church 
and East Bethel School. 



HICKORY CREEK 

See La Harpe Creek. 

HICKORY GROVE 

Peck's Gazetteer for 1X37 identifies this 
as one of the settlement clusters in the county. 
According to Peck, Hickory Grove "is a small 
and beautiful tract of timber on the head of 
Camp Fork. This is sometimes called Walnut 
Grove" (Peck, 219). Camp Fork is obviously a 
mistake and it is nt)t known which creek Peck 
meant. The general location Peck refers to is the 
juncture of the East Fork La Moine River and 
Little Creek. But Peck's note is noteworthy 
because it shows the transition in the naming of 
what is now known only as Walnut Grove. 
"Hickory Grove," which apparently was the 
early name for the settlement, survived in the 
names of the cemetery, the church, and the 
school. 

HICKORY (;R0VE CEMETERY 

I'his cemetery is localetl on the east side 
of the SE quarter of Sec. (S in Walnul (irove 
fwp. The cemetery was adjacent to the Hickory 
(jri)ve ( hurch, later called Shiloh, and is shown 
on all county maps, but no deeds were found. 
The earliest interments date back to the IX60s. 

Hickory is freiiucntly used for jiiacc 
names. Hickory trees are most ofleii tound ui 
hilly locations on steep, broken, and nifcrlile 
soil. 1 he groves coukl have been ualuial. 
allhough hickory gro\es were also planlcti I'oi 
slunie, mils, aiui icsilicul woiul. 



HICKORY GROVE SCHOOL 
(No. 8, Emmet Twp.; No. 54) 

According to the 1885 History (p. 692), 
this school was located on the NE comer of the 
SW quarter of Sec. 22 and was erected in 1877 
on land donated by Cary Griffith. This land 
transaction could not be found, but an 1889 deed 
between Cary F. Griffith and Da\id Lee (Deed: 
64/247) mentions land lease for school purposes. 
The 1893 county atlas shows the school on 
Da\ id Lee's land. 

The rural mail carriers of the early 
1900s called the school "Dublin." This name 
probably reflected on many Irish families in the 
neighborhood (Harris, M.). In 1902 the school 
was called "Claxton," probably after James 
Cla.xton, who in 1913 owned land on the NE 
quarter of the NE quarter of Sec. 22. The school 
closed in 194S when it consolidated with McKee 
School, l-ven though the Macomb area mut 
school board decided to sell the site (Adair W. 
B.. 11/13/1948), no closing deed could be 
located. 

ni( KORN (;ro\ E S( HOOI. 
(No. 2, Walnut (irove Tnp.) 

1 he first school in this neighborhood 
was built in 1852 on the Sli quarler of Sec. 8 
where it is shown on the 1861 maji In 1856 a 
new school was erected on the SW corner of 
Sec. ^'. where it remained until I S63 (1889 
Hislorv, l()vS-|()39) 1 he school served nine 
sections III (he iioilhwesleiii pail of llie lownship 
and was "allciulcd In cliiKlicii for miles around" 



.50 



(1885 History, 1038). It also was used as a 
church. When school districts reorganized in 
1863 children tYom the Hickory Grove School 
attended Locust Grove, Hollow Hill, and 
Hiwassee schools. The Hickory Grove School 
building remained on the site, was ultimately 
sold to the Shiloh Presbyterian Church, and was 
used as church sanctuary (1885 History, 1039). 
No deeds could be found to verity dates and 
locations. 

See also Shiloh Presbyterian Church. 

HICKORY POINT POST OFFICE 

See Industry Post OtTice. 

HICKS SCHOOL 

(No. 8, Hire Twp.; No. 47) 

This school was first built in 1853 and 
was replaced with a new building in 1867. It was 
located on the SW corner of the NW quarter of 
Sec. 34 which Ebenezer N. Hicks, a school 
director since 1852, deeded to trustees in 1868 
(Deeds: 24/246). The school remained on the 
site throughout its existence. It never changed 
its name and consolidated into the Northwest 
District in the late 1940's. The building and 
grounds were sold in 1950 (Adair W. B., 
2/2/1950). 

HIDDEN HILL SUBDIVISION 

This is a Macomb subdivision located 
southeast of town in the SW quarter of Sec. 5 in 
Scotland Twp. 

HIDDEN NOOK SCHOOL 

See Stookey School. 

HIGH MOUND CEMETERY 

See Upper Mound Cemetery. 

HIGH MOUND UNITED BRETHREN 
CHURCH 

See Mound United Brethren Church. 

HIGHWAYS 

There are two U.S. and four Illinois 
State highways in the county. U.S. Hwy. 67 is 
the north-south route, and U.S. Hwy. 136 
(formerly Route 9) the east-west connection. 
They intersect on the east side of Macomb. 
Illinois Hwy. 41 from Galesburg to Havana 



enters the county in Sec. 1 of Prairie City Twp. 
and continues south to join U.S. Hwy. 136 nine 
miles east of Mact)mb and exit the county 
together. Illinois Hwy. 95 enters the county in 
Sec. 24 of Mound Twp. and goes west until it 
ends at Illinois Hwy. 41. Present Illinois IKvy. 9 
crosses the county from east to west through the 
northern tier of townships. Illinois Hwy. 67 
starts at the intersection with U.S. Hwy. 136 in 
Tennessee Twp. and continues south to exit in 
the extreme southwestern part of the county. In 
the first decade of the 2r' Century the long 
awaited four-lane U.S. Hwy. 336 is being 
constructed from Quincy in Adams County to 
Peoria. It enters McDonough County south of 
the present Highway 136 and exits northeast of 
Bushnell. Ultimately, the highway is to connect 
Chicago with Kansas City. 

HILLS GROVE 

This was the early form of the name 
Hillsgrove. The change took place in 1950. All 
entries, regardless of spelling are entered under 
"Hillsgrove." 

HILLSBOROUGH BAPTIST CHURCH 

This congregation organized in 1849 
and in 1852 Jonathan Charter issued a land deed 
to the "Baptist Church" (Mortgages: C/151). 
The land was located on the NE comer of the SE 
quarter of Sec. 18 in Blandinsville Twp., and is 
shown in the 1871 atlas and on maps through 
1938. 

In 1897 the church merged with the 
Blandinsville Baptist Church at which time the 
property was donated to the Blandinsville 
Church (Deeds: 73/554). 

See also Hillsborough Cemetery. 

HILLSBOROUGH CEMETERY 

This cemetery was established in 1849 
at the same time as the church. The 1861 map 
shows it north from the church, while the 1871 
and later maps show the cemetery on the NE 
comer of the SE quarter of Sec. 18 next to the 
church building. The 1905 gift from William 
Blackhurst to trustees of Hillsborough Church 
confirms the location (Deeds: 91/562). 



51 



HILLSGROVE 

Known as the "Old Methodist stomping 
ground," Hillsgrove is one of the oldest 
settlements in the county. It was started in 1830 
when Roswell Tyrell, James Fulkerton, a man by 
the name of Hill, Isaac Holton and Waddill 
family settled on sections 28 and 29 of 
Tennessee Twp. The plat for "HilTs Grove" on 
the SW quarter of Sec. 29 was tiled by Isaac 
Holton on Feb. 22, 1844 (Mortgages: B/458). 
The name was suggested by Mrs. Esther Hill, a 
sister of Mrs. Isaac Holton, who settled nearby 
(Rinehart, 25). The neighborhood is still known 
by this name. 

HILLS GROVE CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the SE 
comer of Sec. 30 in Tennessee Twp. on land 
which Phebe Holton donated in 1863 (Deeds: 
13/111). Numerous burials predate the 1863 
deed. The cemetery contains the graves of 
Roswell Tyrrell and Abraham Fulkerson, both 
veterans of the War of 1 8 1 2 who settled on lands 
awarded to them for wartime services. The 
cemetery is still in use. It is sometimes referred 
to as Owens Cemetery. 

MM. LS GROVE CHURCH 

This Methodist Episcopal congregation, 
still acti\e, traces its beginnings to 1832 when 
Hillsgrove came to be known as the "Old 
Methodist stomping ground." At first services 
were held in private homes, then in 1836 in 
Isaac Holton's "Seminary" (1885 History, 563), 
and after the Civil War in public school 
buildings. The sanctuary was built in 1891, on 
land donated by David Van Brugh Gilchrist 
(Deeds: 62/208). It is located on the SW quarter 
ol Sec. 29 in Tennessee Twp. 

HH,I>S GROVE POST OFFICE 

Ihis post olTicc was established on May 
23, 1840, with Isaac Holton as post master. It 
was discontinued on .luly 22, 1867, reestablished 
on Oct. 23, 1876 and discontinued again on 
April 21, 1898 when services were transferred to 
leiuiessee. 



HH.LSGROVE SCHOOL 

(.No. 1, Tennessee Twp.; No. 199) 

This school was one of two buildings in 
the district. It was located on the north side of 
the SW quarter of Sec. 29. The land deed for the 
school ground was issued by Isaac Webb in 
1860 (Deeds: 7/386), but the school does not 
appear on maps until 1893. The grounds were 
sold off in 1956 (Deeds: 215/416). 

See also Midland School 

HILLS GROVE SEMINARY 

This school, also called "Hill's Grove 
Academy," was of two early institutions of post- 
elementary education in the county. The school 
was established in 1836 by Isaac Holton and in 
1837 it received a charter as an academy. It was 
located in the Hills Grove settlement on Sec. 29 
of Tennessee Twp. (1885 History, 561). During 
its existence, the building was used as school, 
church, and public meeting place. It was 
removed in 1861 (Rinehart, 7). The 1885 history 
states that the building was also used as a station 
for the Underground Railroad, but this was 
never documented. Holton was from Vermont 
and Massachusetts, and was a Congregationalist, 
so was probably favoring abolition and willing 
to help slaves escape to freedom. 

See also McDonough College. 

HILLSGROVE STATION 

Located east from Hillsgro\ e in order to 
provide the neighborhood with a railroad stop, 
Hillsgrove Station was platted in 1871 by Larkin 
C. Bacon (Mortgages: 3 496). The station was 
sometimes called "Larkm's .Addition." or 
"Bacon's Addition." It was located on the 
C.B. & Q. railroad line in the NW corner of the 
SW quarter of Sec. 28 in Tennessee Twp. The 
1871 and the 1876 maps of the coiuUv label liie 
station "Raboin." which is Jewish for teacher. 
This was probably in reference to Hills Grove 
Seminary. The 1S93 atlas calls it "llillsgiove." 
and the 1913 atlas shows a nameless jilat. By 
1919 the station is not shown aiiv more. 

HIRE TOWNSIIII* 

rhis is C'oiigiessii>nal l\>wnship 6North 
4\\est from the 4' Principal Meruliaii Hire 
I'ownship was settled In Kentuckiaiis. with a 
very slight iiiixlurc Ironi t'llier stales (t'laike. 



137). The first settler was Richard Dunn who 
seemed to have squatted in the northern part of 
the township. William Job stopped at his cabin 
in the spring of 1826 (1885 History, 623). 

The original name for the township was 
Rock Creek, but this name was changed in 1857 
in order to honor George W. Hire. Hire was a 
veteran of the War of 1812. He settled in the 
area in 1851 and was a state legislator in 1857 
(1885 History. 629). 

HIWASSIE SCHOOL 

See Hiawatha School. 

HOAGLAND BURIALS 

Not much is known about this family 
cemetery except that it is located on the SE 
quarter of Sec. 24 in Macomb Tvvp. on land 
owned by the Hoagland family from 1839 to 
1880. 

HOG MISSION 

See Lamoine Chapel. 

HOGVVALLOW BRANCH 

This small stream runs in an easterly 
direction through the southwestern part of 
Lamoine Twp. to joins La Moine River in Sec. 
34. In its western reaches, the creek is only an 
intermittent stream. The name seems dismissive 
in nature, mdicating that the stream was more 
mud than water. Usually water courses this 
small did not have specific names attached to 
them, but Hogwallow was close to an important 
early bridge over the La Moine River. 

See also Cow Ford Bridge. 

HOLDEN'S or HOLDINGS BRIDGE 

This bridge was mentioned in 1848 
(RSR, 28). It was a bridge over Troublesome 
Creek in Lamoine Twp. on the SE quarter of 
Sec. 16. It was probably named for Jonathan 
Holden, an early settler. 

HOLLER BRIDGE 

This bridge over the East Fork La Moine 
River is located on the county road between 
sections 15 and 22 in Macomb Twp. The name 
comes from the David Holler family, which 
owned nearby land. 



HOLLER CLAY BANK 

See Clay banks and clay pits. 

HOLLOW HILL SCHOOL 

See Holly Hill School. 

HOLLY HILL METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

The sanctuary for this congregation was 
located on the NW corner of Sec. 7 in Walnut 
Grove Twp., but it is shown in this location only 
congregation is known to have worshiped in the 
Holly Hill School, and maps do not indicate any 
church building. Services ceased in 1914. 

See also Hickory Grove School (Walnut 
Grove Twp.). 

HOLLY HILL SCHOOL 

(No. 3, Walnut Grove Tvvp.; No. 12) 

This school was located on the NE 
corner of Sec. 7. According to Clarke's history 
it was built in 1863 and called "Hollow Hill" 
(Clarke, 426) which might have been a 
misspelling of "Holly." The school is shown in 
this location on all maps of the county. USGS 
maps call the school "Mt. Holly," but 
subsequent lists of public schools refer to it as 
Holly Hill. No initial deed of land could be 
located, but an 1949 deed from school 
commissioners verifies the location. (Deeds: 
206/232). The school consolidated into the 
Blandinsville-Sciota District # 175 m 1946. 

American Holly is a native plant, which 
gave names to many natural features. 

HOLTEN S or HOLTON' SEMINARY 

See Hills Grove Seminary. 

HOPEWELL OLD SCHOOL 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

This is the early name of the Bardolph 
Presbyterian Church. The congregation 
organized in 1852 in the Wolf Grove 
schoolhouse located on Kepple family land, 
southeast of Bardolph. The next year a sanctuary 
was erected in the town. (Bardolph, 51 ). 

Hopewell was a popular name for 
religious institutions. 



53 



HOPPER'S MILL 

Hopper's Mill was a gristmill, started by 
A. P. Hopper in a ravine southwest from 
Blandinsville. It was in operation during the 
1850s (MDJ, 12/19/1878, p.l). 

HORACE HEAD BRIDGE 

There is only one reference to this name 
(MDJ, 9/13/1907). It was located "west from 
Macomb and east of Van Fleet's house." The 
bridge is over Spring Creek near the SE corner 
of the SW quarter of Sec. 28 of Emmet Twp. on 
the road from Macomb to Carthage. Horace C. 
Head owned extensive land adjacent to the 
bridge. The bridge might also have been named 
for Horace Head, son of William Thomas Head, 
who disappeared without trace. 

HORN FIELD CAMPUS 

This collection of log buildings and 
nature paths, located on 85 acres in Sec. 12 of 
Chalmers Twp., is an outdoor education facility 
of Western Illinois University. Frank .1. Horn, a 
Macomb businessman, donated half the interest 
in the property to the University in 1965. The 
campus, which consists of several smaller, and a 
central large log cabin, was built by Col. 
William Bacon during the depression as a 
private recreational place. The grounds included 
a virgin forest, a lake, which has since been 
drained, and a field of native prairie vegetation 
The facility is known locally as "Tlom Lodge." 

HORSESHOE POND 

Several ponds \n McDonougii County 
have this name. Two in Macomb Twp. were 
located in Sec. 14 (Harris, Z.). 

HOUSTON'S CREEK 

Colton's map of 1 868 used this name for 
the upper reaches of the La Moine Ri\cr ni 
HIanduisville Iwp. Huston family nicnibcrs 
owned much land ui llic noiiheaslern part of the 
township. On the 1871 map the slieani ran 
through laiul owned by I'homas lluslon. 

ilOVENDEN BRII)(;E 

riiere is only one knov\n occurrence ol 
this name (M.I 5/5/190.^, p. 5). liiis was (he 
bridge o\er liic Drowiiiiiij iork helwccn sections 
21 aiu! 22 in Hiislincll rw|i I lie hndsje \\as 



named alter E. Hovenden who was shown to 
own land in 1 893 on the SE quarter of Sec. 2 1 . 

"THE HUB OF THE MILITARY TRACT " 

This slogan for Macomb was coined in 
the late 1890s during the campaign for the 
location of a newly appropriated Illinois State 
normal school. Local boosters argued that 
Macomb was located at the center of the 
Military Tract and therefore no student would 
have to travel more than one day to reach the 
college. The name was revived in the 1920s 
when a catch-word sign was needed on hard 
roads entering Macomb. It was subsequently 
used for commercial purposes, but is in disuse 
today. 

See also Illinois Military Tract. 

HUFF CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the SW 
comer of the NE quarter of Sec. 35 in 
Blandinsville Twp., on land donated in 1884 by 
James Anderson "to be known as Anderson 
Graveyard" (Deeds; 51/259). It is shown on all 
county maps from 1871 to 1913. Anderson 
family graveyard was located on Preston 
Anderson's land and the first burials in the 
1850s were family members. In later years, the 
cemetery was known as HutT, retlecting 
numerous Huff family burials. 

HUMBARD/HUMBERT CEMETERY 

See Spring Creek Cemetery. 

HUME SCHOOL 

(No. 8, Colchester Twp.; No. 115) 

Located on the NW corner of Sec. 19, 
this school was alv\ays known by this name. 
The school was a union school of District No. 8 
in Chalmers Twp. and District No. 7 in 
Tennessee Twp. (ieorge Hume donated the 
original land in 1860 (Deeds: 8 237), and again 
in 1886 (Deeds: 69/437). The grounds passed 
into pri\ ale hands in I ')50 ( Deeds: 207 110). 

HUMMER'S MILL 

This mill was located on ihe NH corner 
of Sec. 22 in Macomb Twp., on the East fork 
I aMoiiie River. ]usl east of the present Holler 
Hrulge 1 lie null was built in IS34 b\ .lohn T. 
Bishop and (iei)iL;e Millei ( C ommissioners: 



54 



A/lSl). By 1836 Abner Walker must have 
become part owner because then the mill is 
called "Walker and Miller's Mill" 
(Commissioners: A/291). In the same year a 
deed of land from Alexander Harris to Abner 
Walker specifies that the land included 
"Walker's Mills" (Deeds: G/291). In 1843 the 
mill was sold to Garrett and Robert Bonham. 
Four years later a mill, called Bonham's Mill, is 
mentioned as being located near the road from 
Knoxville to Macomb (Commissioners: B/465). 
In 1851 Garrett Bonham sold the mill to William 
Hummer (Deeds: P/81). Macomb Journal 
confirmed the name in 1851 (12/26/1851) and so 
did the Road Survey Records in 1855 (p. 130). 
Joseph L. Turner purchased the mill in 1856 
(Mortgages M/1 1) and ran it until 1864 when it 
was torn down (MDJ, 4/3/1925, p. 6). David 
Holler acquired the property. 

As agricultural use of the watershed 
increased and drain tiles were installed, the 
runoff from the fields intensified and water 
supply became unreliable. In the last years of 
operation Turner used steam to run the mill. The 
Alexander Harris family tradition has it that the 
burrstones are buried in the bed of the East Fork 
La Moine River (Harris, M.). 

HUNT'S BRIDGE 

This bridge is located on the East Fork 
La Moine River on the north side of the SW 
quarter of Sec. 1 1 in Tennessee Twp., just 
northwest from Colchester. The original bridge 
was somewhat north of the present site and was 
built prior to 1848 when it was called Hunt's 
Bridge (RSR, 25). It apparently replaced a ford, 
called Hunt Ford, shown in 1861 on the NW 
quarter of Sec. 1 1. This was one of the river 
crossings on the Macomb-Carthage road. 

The name is probably after Joshua Hunt, 
an intluential early settler, or Samuel Hunt, the 
county surveyor. 

HUSTON or HOUSTON LAWN SCHOOL 
(No. 1, Blandinsville Twp.; No. 30) 

This school was located on the SE 
comer of Sec. 2, on land deeded by William L. 
Woodside in 1883 (Deeds: 47/560). The district 
was organized in 1858 and a building built in 
1872 (Clarke, 433). Clarke located the building 
of "District No. 1" on the SW corner of Sec. 2, 



but all maps of the county show it in the 
SE corner. The 1893 and 1913 maps show a 
nearby residence, on John Huston's land. The 
name might imply the school was close to 
Huston's front yard. It consolidated into the 
Blandinsville-Sciota District tt 175 in 1946 and 
the grounds were sold in 1949 (Deeds: 215/513). 

HUTCHINSON CEMETERY or 
GRAVEYARD 

See Oak Ridge Cemetery. 



55 



I,J,K 



ILLINOIS MILITARY TRACT 

The Illinois Military Tract was located 
between the Mississippi and Illinois rivers. The 
north boundary was an east-west line along the 
north side of Township 14N from the 
Beardstown Base Line. It was one of several 
land tracts set aside by U.S. Congress to 
compensate soldiers of the War of 1812 and 
several other military engagements. 

The tracts were lands acquired from 
Indian tribes. They were surveyed and opened 
for settlement. Each soldier received a quarter 
section, or 160 acres, of arable soil, while 
officers received a full section. Few of these 
grantees actually settled on their new land. Most 
sold their parcels to land speculators. 

INDEPENDENCE SCHOOL 
(Emmet Twp.; No. 58) 

This school was located on the south 
side of the SW quarter of Sec. ?>2. The school 
did not appear on maps until 1^)13 although it 
was mentioned in the Macomb Daily .lournal in 
1895 (12/18/1895). It is known to have existed 
until the 1940s, but no deeds could be found to 
confirm the dates of its beginning or end. The 
name probably reflects the pride in American 
independence lie)m r.ngland, but. in view of its 
late appearance, it could also have signified the 
Ibrmation of a new school district. 

INDEPENDENT BAPTIST ( HIRCII 

This Baptist congregation in Rmmet 
Twp. organized in 1847 and built its house of 
worship in 1858-1859. An 1859 land deed from 
Joshua Simmons to William Pennington (Deeds: 
7/60) "for the purpose of building the 
Independent Church," confirmed the building 
date and placed the church near the Nl' coiner of 
the SF-' quarter of Sec. 9 in Ijnmet Twp.. instead 
of Sec. 10 as stated in the 1885 history (p. 468). 
Coiuity atlases for 1871, 1X93, aiul h) I 3 show a 
cliiuch on Sec. 9. I he I 9)9 map does not I'he 
church was known bv this name as laic as 1895, 



although the 1885 history of the county said it 
was no longer functioning ( 1885 History, 468). 

An obituary for Mrs. Joshua Simmons 
who died in 1897 tells that she died at her home 
near "Liberty Church" (Pioneers, 323). This 
seems to be the church shown in the 1893 atlas, 
but it is not known whether it was a new 
congregation or an alternate name for the 
Independent Baptist Church. 

INDIAN BRANCH 

This was the name of the south tributary 
of Carter Creek in Sec. 24 of Industry Twp. It 
appears in 1851 on a road plat (RSR, 72). The 
name concurs with numerous other references 
indicating that the area used to be favorite Indian 
hunting grounds. 

See also Camp Creek. 

INDIAN BURIALS 

Local lore states that a group of Indians 
was escorted across McDonough County to 
Iowa. While en route they were forced to spend 
the winter on Sec. 25 in Chalmers Twp. where 
many died of smallpo.x. Their graves are 
believed to be on the NW quarter of Sec. 25 
(1976 History, 20). In his memoirs, William T. 
Brooking also told of a group of 300 Indians 
being transported on foot through McDonough 
County. He placed this event in the 1840s 
(Rezab, 15). 

From 1833 to 1847 the Potauatomi 
were forced to mo\e from northern Illinois to 
reser\ations in northwestern Missouri and 
Leavenworth, Kansas. It is possible that some 
came through McDonough County, but only one 
local mention of that c\cnt has been found. 

INDLVN CRAVE HILL 

According to an article in the Macomb 
Daily Journal (6 25 1901, p. 3) this is the high 
cliff at the juncture of the Killjoidan and 
Irouhlcsomc creeks. The cliff was the gra\csite 
of an Indian named Jordan, for whom Killjordan 
Creek was supposedly named, fhe location is 
on the NL quarter of Sec 27 in Chalmers 1 wp. 

Sec also Kill|ordan deck. 



50 



INDIAN MOUNDS 

This name was given tn a row of 20 
hillocks, 3 to 6 feet high and 15 to 25 feet 
across, located in the eastern half of Sec. 30 in 
Bethel Twp. (1885 History, 695). It is not 
known how these hillocks originated, nor that 
they contained human remains, but the site is on 
bluffs along Camp Creek, a location generally 
favored by Indians for camps and burials. 

Another alleged site of Indian mounds is 
on the east side of Bethel Twp. The site consists 
of raised hillocks in the pasture on the hillside 
overlooking Grindstone Creek (Mainline). 



Peter Ripatoe" might have just pulled the leg of 
Industry's boosters and the nickname stuck. 

Pinhook is also the name of a number of 
towns in Tennessee, Indiana and Missouri, so 
the name might have been the place of origin of 
one or more of the early settlers. In any event, 
what started as a jest or a fond remembrance of a 
settler's hometown has become a homey 
attribute, reflecting residents' perception of their 
town as a small, comfortable place to live in. It 
is in this sense that "Pinhook" is now used 
during annual festivals. 

See also Springer Grave. 



INDUSTRY 

The Industry town plat for William R. 
Downen, Abraham Gossett and Benjamin B. 
Uttley was entered on Oct. 17, 1S55 (Mortgages: 
G/286-7), three years after the post office called 
Industry was established. It is said that the 
place was named by John M. Price, a 
blacksmith, who was induced by Johnson 
Downen to settle there in 1846 (Clarke, 643). 
The location of a blacksmith shop often served 
as a nucleus of a developing community, which 
depended on these services for its survival. So it 
is plausible that Price had a say in the coinage of 
the name for the post office and later the new 
town. The name was unquestionably used in a 
commendatory way. 

"Industry" is found in nLimerous states. 
In Te.xas, it is locally believed that the name 
reflects on the industrious character of its first 
settlers. The same is also true in Maryland 
(Placenames). It is therefore puzzling that 
Industry in McDonough county was known as 
"Pinhook" during the early years of its 
existence, and that this nickname has persisted. 
The name is attributed to Mr. Springer (Clarke, 
643) and "jolly old Peter Ripatoe" (Road Agent, 
3), but it has never been explained in either the 
county histories nor in local oral tradition. 

"Pinhook" stands for a fish hook made 
of a bent pin, an insignificant article. On the 
other hand, "pinhooker," according to Webster, 
is a small speculator in tobacco at a local 
market, the name originating in South Carolina. 
"Pinhooker" also meant a shady dealer. It is not 
known which one of the above meanings was 
attribLited to the town of Industry. The "jolly old 



INDUSTRY CEMETERY 

Located on the NE quarter of Sec. 15 in 
Industry Twp., the first plat for the town 
cemetery was filed in 1893 (Plats: 2/123), but 
burials preceded that date. This cemetery is still 
in use. 

INDUSTRY POST OFFICE 

This post office was initially called 
Hickory Point and was established on May 30, 
1 849, with Joel Pennington as postmaster. 
Pennington was then residing on the north half 
of Sec. 22 in Industry Twp., just south of the 
present town of Industry. On October 19, 1852 
the name of the post office changed to Industry. 

INDUSTRY TOWNSHIP 

This is Congressional Township 4North, 
2West fVom the 4"' Principal Meridian. Because 
the township was forested along Grindstone and 
Carter creeks, it appealed to the early settlers 
from Kentucky and Tennessee and served as a 
jumping-off point for the settlement of the open 
prairies to the north and northeast. Early 
population clusters in the township, such as 
Roger's Settlement, Carter's Creek, and Camp 
Creek are the oldest settlements in the county. 
In 1856 when all county townships acquired 
specific names, the township was named after 
the town of Industry 

IRISH CEMETERY 

See Gin Ridge Cemetery. 



57 



JACKSON PARK 

Frank Horn, a local Macomb 
businessman, donated in 1952 a substantial plot 
of land to the Prairie Council of Boy Scouts of 
America (Deeds: 216/528). The land was 
located on the SW quarter of the SW quarter of 
Sec. 10, the East Vi of Sec. 16, the SE quarter of 
the SE quarter of Sec. 9 and a small adjoining 
track in Sec. 15 in Tennessee Twp. The land 
was developed into a camp called Camp Pearl 
for the deceased wife of Horn. After 
reorganization in 1981 the Council decided to 
sell the property. Macomb dentist Clarence 
Jackson acquired the land (Deeds: 81/4385) and 
turned it over to the YMCA of McDonough 
County (Deeds: 81/4641). The camp was 
renamed Jackson Park. 

JACKSON SCHOOL 

(No. 2, Mound Twp.; No. 73) 

The earliest school in this neighborhood 
was taught in 1839 on Sec. 20, on the farm of 
Jacob Kepple (Clarke, 974). In 1862 a reor- 
ganization of the districts resulted in a new 
location, on the NE corner of Sec. 19, on land 
donated by David Beal m 1862 (Deeds: 11/34). 
The school was moved in 1867 one half mile 
south, to the NE comer of the SE quarter of Sec. 
19 onto land deeded in 1876 by David Beal 
(Deeds: 62/483). This school is first shown on 
the 1893 atlas. It consolidated with the 
Bardolph School District in 1947, and was sold 
the same year (McDonough C.T., 7/3 1/1947). 

The school was probably named after 
the William Jackson family. Jacksons served as 
early school directors and owned land close by. 

JACOBYC.RAVE 

This is an LUKJalcd biMial site of 
A. Jacoby, ihc 4-year old child of Andrew 
Jacoby. It is located on the SW quarter of the 
NE quarter of Sec. 14 m l-mmet iwp. ihc 
Jacoby fanuly did not own thai property, st) it is 
unknown why Ihe chikl was buried there. Other 
family members are buried in the Spring Creek 
Cemetery. 

JA( Om Mil. I. 

•See IMieips Mill. 



JAMES CLARKE'S MILL 

In 1831 Road Survey Records and 
County Commissioners Court Record mention 
this mill as being west of Macomb (RSR, 25; 
Commissioners: A/ 14). The mill was located on 
Sec. 33 of Emmet Twp. (Elting). The SW 
quarter of Sec. 33 became property of David 
Clarke in 1833 (Deeds: A/ 173) and changed 
owners several times between 1833 and 1837. 
The mill apparently preceded McDonald's Mill. 

See also McDonald's Mill. 

JAMES NISS SUBDIVISION 

This is a Macomb subdivision located 
southwest of town on the SE comer of the SW 
quarter of Sec. 9 in Chalmers Twp. 

JENKINS CEMETERY 

See White Flock Cemetery. 

JERUSALEM UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

This congregation started in 1865 as 
Jerusalem Chapel of the United Brethren 
Church. The sanctuary was located on the SW 
comer of the NW quarter of Sec. 1 1 m Macomb 
Twp., on land deeded to the United Brethren 
Church by Nicholas Combs in 1867 (Deeds: 
25/539). It was dedicated in 1868 as Jerusalem 
Evangelical United Brctiiren Church. From 
1871 to 1875 the building was also the house of 
worship for the Mt. Pisgah l:\angelical Lutheran 
Church. A new building in 1918 replaced the 
old structure and the church became a United 
Methodist congregation. Jerusalem Church is an 
active rural congregation. 

JOB'S or JOBESCREEK 

See Baptist Creek. 

JOB'S SETTLEMENT 

Job's Settlement is the second oldest 
settlement in the counly. It starteti in iS2(i when 
William ami Iraby Job. William Southward and 
j-phraim Perkins, all brothers-in-law, settled on 
ihc east side of Sec. 33 in Blandinsville Iwp., 
onl\ 2 miles north liom Sec '■' in Hue Tup., 
where Hugh Wilson settled the same \ear. The 
neigliborhootl was n, lined alter William Job. 
When I Idei John I ogaii settled i>n the NE 
quarter ot Sec S iii Hue fwp in 1S35. Job's 



.5S 



Settlement became the center for an early 
Baptist community, also called New Hope. 
"Job's Settlement" lost its importance after 
Blandinsville was platted in 1842 and became 
the market center for the area. 

See also Blandinsville and Baptist 
Creek. 

JOHN O. C. WILSON MILL 

See Wilson's Mill (Chalmers Twp.). 

JOHNSON POST OFFICE 

See Pennington Pomt Post Office. 

JOHN'S LITTLE ACRE SUBDIVISION 

This is a Colchester subdivision which 
adjoins Argyle Lake State Park on the NE corner 
of the NW quarter of Sec. 1 in Colchester Twp. 

JONES CEMETERY 

See Pioneer Cemetery. 

JONES FORD 

The ford over the East Fork La Moine 
River north of Colchester was on the main road 
leading to Blandinsville and was originally 
known as Leard or Sycamore Ford. The name 
changed in 1M()3 when George Jones was killed 
in a coal-munng accident on his land adjacent to 
the ford (MDJ. 10/14/1903. p. 3). 

JONES SCHOOL 

See Oak Grove School (Scotland Twp.). 

"THE JUNGLE" 

See Ferster Woods. 

KEITH SCHOOL 

See Pittenger School. 

KENNEDY MILL 

See Lamoine Mills. 

KEOKUK JUNCTION RAILWAY 
COMPANY 

See Toledo, Peoria & Western Railway. 

KEPPLE BURIAL PLOT 

According to the 1976 History (p. 37), 
this cemetery was located south of Bardolph in 
Mound Twp., but has since been obliterated. It 



was probably in Sec. 19. There is no present- 
day knowledge of this cemetery and no records 
could be located. 

KEPPLE CREEK 

This creek originates in Sec. 27 of 
Macomb Twp. It runs east-northeast to Sec. 16 
in Mound Twp., then doubles back and runs in a 
northwesterly direction through Sec. 16, S, and 7 
to empty into the Drowning Fork in Sec. <S. 
When David Kepple petitioned to build a bridge 
in Sec. 16 of Mound Township in 1850 (RSR. 
65) the stream was called "Crooked Creek, 
South Fork." This confirms that Drowning Fork 
was first understood to be the East Fork La 
Moine River. 

The name Kepple comes from the early 
pioneer families of David, James, and Jacob 
Kepple who settled on section 19 and 20. 

See also Drowning Fork. 

KEY'S MILL 

See Pleasant Valley Mill. 

KILLJORDAN CREEK 

This creek tJows from the east side of 
the town of Macomb in a southwesterly 
direction through sections 1, 11, 10, 16, 21, and 
22 of Chalmers Twp. to empty into Troublesome 
Creek in the NE corner of Sec. 27. The stream 
was not named in the original survey records, 
but in 1837 Peck's Gazetteer used the name 
"Town Fork" for Killjordan Creek. County 
Commissioners Court confirmed this name. 
Before 1837 the stream was called "Town 
Branch (alias Killjordon)," but in March of 1837 
it was "Kill Jaridon" and in June of the same 
year "Kill Joidon (alias Town Fork)" 
(Commissioners: A/315, 338). The name was 
subsequently spelled "Killgordon," "Kill 
Jordon," and on the 1875 USGS map for Illinois 
as "Jordon River." 

The origin of the name is a mystery. 
The best known story tells of a young Indian boy 
named Jordan, who was killed by a wounded 
deer and was buried on a high bluff overlooking 
the juncture of the Killjordan and the 
Troublesome Creek. The story is repeated in the 
1901 article in the Macomb Journal, in which 
early settlers hatl heard from the Indians that an 
Indian named Jordan, after killinu 169 deer in 



59 



one season, was himself killed by a deer he had 
wounded and thought dead. According to the 
article, the place of the Indian's death was 
marked and was located on the road from 
Wilson's Mill to Beardstown. 

There is a problem with this story. 169 
deer is a lot of venison when Indians and early 
settlers competed for food. So the story might 
have been an Indian story with a moral. The 
young brave who slew so many deer invited 
death in the eyes of native peoples who hunted 
only for sustenance and apologized to their prey 
prior to killing them. 

Other accounts reiterate the story of the 
Indian's death, but do not connect that death 
with the name "Jordan" (Hallwas, 1984, 1 1-13). 
One of these describes a scaffolding with an 
Indian burial remains in 1841 (Rezab, 16). But 
none of these accounts connect the Indian brave 
with the name of the creek. 

The name "Kill Jordan" could have been 
given by Charles and Maria Bartleson, who in 
1837 settled on an extensive tract of land in 
sections 10 and 22 of Chalmers Twp., through 
which the creek wound its way. Charles 
Bartleson was a sea captain from Philadelphia 
who originally came from Scotland. In Scotland 
the word "kill," of Dutch origin, means channel. 
In the United States the word means channel, 
stream or creek, and is frequently used in place 
names in New York and New England. 
Bartlesons would have been familiar with this 
usage. 

The biggest problem with the name 
Kiiljordan is ".lordan." It is unlikely that an 
Indian would have been known by this name, 
because it was uncommon among early settlers. 
Jordan, on the other hand, is a name of the river 
m Palestine, the crossing of which is used in 
pietistic language to symbolize death. The 
meaning of "Kiiljordan" could, therefore, be 
interpreted to mean the "ri\ er of death," an apt 
name for a creek that so many early settlers 
associated with Indian deaths and burial sites, 
furthermore, Kiiljordan has lived up to its 
reputation. Accortling to the Macomb Dailv 
Journal of March 12, 1900 (p. 3). James I. 
Hodges rescued William Coiiiptons son from 
ilrounmg in the creek. Subsequently, Com|iton. 
\slio IkuI served as an Illinois Reiiresenlati\ e. 
gave iiiiii a lob on the Macoinli Westein Illinois 



Railroad (MDJ, 8/21, 1971). And in 1971 a 
young girl drowned in Macomb when a 
Kiiljordan flash flood pulled her into the conduit 
(MDJ, 7/19/1971, p.2). The creek, which in 
local usage is "the creek, on which an Indian 
Jordan was killed," is indeed a creek that kills - 
and so folklore prevails. 

See also Indian Grave Hill. 

KING or KING-TABLER CEMETERY or 
GRAVE YARD 

This cemetery on the NE comer of the 
SW quarter of Sec. 4 in Lamoine Twp. was 
established as a family burial ground, and was 
known as King Grave Yard ( 1 885 History, 
1025). In 1856 descendents of James King 
donated land to trustees of a burial ground 
(Deeds: 5/390), and an additional land 
transaction took place in 1878 (Deeds: 62 339). 
The cemetery was also known as Tabler 
Cemetery, because of the pro.ximity of Tabler 
land holdings. Burials date from mid 1830s. 
The cemetery is shown only on the 1893 and the 
1913 atlases. The name derives from James 
King, an early settler and a prominent minister 
in the Hills Grove neighborhood. 

See also Owen's Cemetery. 

KIRKPATRICK SWITCH 

This was a railroad stop on the Macomb, 
Industry, and Littleton R.R. line. The stop had a 
rail sidetrack, stock pens, a loading chute, and a 
small elevator. It served almost exclusively for 
the shipping of farm products. The switch was 
on the SW quarter of Sec. 7 in Industry Twp., 
and was named for the Kirkpatrick land holdings 
on which it was located. It was shown in the 
1924 Rand McNallv Commercial Atlas of 
America. 

KOST CEMETERY 

See Pioneer Cemeterv . 



00 



L 



LA HARPE CREEK 

This creek originates in west Sciota 
Twp. and trends west-southwest through Sciota 
and Blandinsville townships to empty into the 
La Moine River in south La Harpe Twp. in 
Hancock County. The earliest name was "Turtle 
Creek" (Tanner map, 1823). In 1832 and in 
1838 it was called "Deakin's Creek" and 
"Dicken's Creek" (Commissioners; A/S2; B/2) 
undoubtedly after William Deakins who was an 
early settler on the SW quarter of Sec. 20 in 
Blandinsville Twp. Peck's Gazetteer followed 
with "Dickens Fork." Colby's map of 1868 
calls the creek "Decker's Creek," but the 1861 
map and Worthen map of 1875 call it "Hickory 
Creek." 

It is not known when the creek got its 
present name. 

LAKE MACOMB 

See Spring Lake. 

LAKE OF THE WOODS 

This small lake formed by damming the 
East Fork La Moine River, was located just west 
of the east line of Sec. 25 in Emmet Twp. It is 
shown on the 1912 USGS map of the Macomb 
Quadrangle and there are references to it in 1925 
(MDJ, 8/17/1925). This was a recreational spot. 
complete with a dance hall. It was located just 
west of the present bridge over the River on 
Highway 61 north of Macomb (Crabb). 

LAKE MICHAIL 

This is a man-made lake located in the 
south half of Sec. 5 in Scotland Twp. The 
Hidden Hill subdivision of Macomb is located 
around the lake. 



8/13/1902, p.4). Accordmg to the (iaiesburg 
Register Mail for December 28, 1984 it was also 
known as "Skean's Pond." It does not exist any 
more. 

See also (iailett Creek. 

LAKE TERESA SUBDIVISION 

This is a small subdivision of Colchester 
located on the NE comer of the NW quarter of 
Sec. 24 in Colchester Twp. 

LA MAINE 

See Lamoine. 

LA MAINE RIVER 

See La Moine River. 

LAMOINE (settlement) 

Morse's 1854 and Colton's 1868 maps 
of Illinois show a settlement by this name on the 
SVV quarter of Sec. 16 in Lamoine Twp. 
northwest of the contluence of the Troublesome 
and Crooked creeks. Road Survey Records for 
1856 show this name on the NW corner of the 
SE quarter of Sec. 21 in Lamoine Twp (RSR, 
180). The settlement which centered on Lamoine 
Mills and the intersection of sections 20, 21 and 
16, was next to the bridge on the state road from 
Macomb to Quincy. It included a post office 
and a church. In later years the neighborhood in 
Sec. 16 became known as "Dog Town" (1976 
History, 32), while the settlement in Sec. 21 was 
known as Tucker Town. The explanation for the 
name "Dog Town" is not known, unless it 
reflected the opinion that the declining 
settlement was overrun by dogs or had gone to 
dogs. 

Indian occupancy predated white 
settlement. Settlers in the area found remains of 
a large Indian camp consisting of numerous 
wigwams (Young, 18). 

See also Lamoine Bridge, La Moine 
Post Office, and Tucker Town. 



LAKE SURPRISE 

Located on the NE quarter of Section 2, 
in Prairie City Twp., just west of town, this lake 
was built in 1887 by James L. Skean to provide 
ice for Prairie City. In 1902 the lake had boats, 
an ice house and picnic grounds (MD.I, 



LAMOINE BRIDGE 

This was the oldest bridge in the county, 
presumably built near an earlier ford over the La 
Moine Ri\er in Sec. 21 of Lamoine Twp. An 
order to build a "bridge across Crooked Creek" 
was issued in 1831 (Commissioners: A/57). 



61 



Together with a mill built in 1<S37. the bridge 
provided focus tor a settlement. A bridge still 
spans the river in this location. 

See also Lamoine (settlement). 

LAMOINE CHAPEL 

Also called United Brethren Church 
of Lamoine Township and Lamoine United 
Brethren Church (MDJ, 9/19/1898, p. 3). this 
was the house of worship for the Plymouth 
Mission of the United Brethren. It was built in 
1872 just south of the mill and the bridge, on the 
SE comer of the SW quarter of Sec. 21 (Young, 
209). The chapel is shown on county maps from 
1893 to 1922, but it is believed that the building 
was sold and moved in 1920 (Peter, 103). In 
later years the chapel was known by the name of 
"Hog Mission" because of hogs burrowing and 
raising ruckus during church services (1976 
History, 32-33). 

LAMOINE CREEK 

See La Moine River. 

LAMOINE MILL or MILLS 

This was an important water-powered 
flour mill located on the west bank of the La 
Moine River near the center of Sec. 2 1 in 
Lamoine Twp. It was erected in 1837 by 
Benjamin Butler Gates and was called Gate's 
Mill. In 1838 it was Gates and Doyles Mill 
(Commissioners, B/1), and in 1840 and 1843 
Doyles Mill. In 1849 and 1852 this was 
Randolph and Hendrickson Mill (MJ, 
12/31/1852, p. 2) and in 1858 Kennedy Mill. 
The 1861 map shows it as "Lamoine Saw Mill," 
and the 1871 atlas as "La Moine Mills." 
Accorduig to the 1885 history it was still 
functionuig at that time (1885 History, 662). It 
is iu)t known when il disconliiuictl operation. 

LA MOINE POST OFFICE 

flic llrst post office in this \icinit\ was 
established in 1837 as La Mine Post OtTice. It 
was located in Schuyler County. It discontinued 
operation in 1839. A new olTice, callcil la 
Moine, started on August 21, 1840 with 
Benjamin B. Gales as postmaster (iales was the 
owner of the (iates Mill, later called I amoine 
and located on the SI- i|uartcr of Seclioii 21 in 
Laniomc I'w p I he post olTicc iliseoiilinucd on 



January 19, 1844. A post office called "La 
Maine" is shown on the 1857 Chapman's map of 
Illinois located on the NE quarter of Sec. 28 in 
Lamoine Twp., close to the important early 
Lamoine bridge. Chapman's map probably 
misspelled the name and was outdated because 
no records could be found to document a post 
office after 1 844. 

See also Lamoine (Settlement). 

LAMOINE RIVER 

This is the present locally-favored name 
and spelling for the East Fork La Moine River. 

LAMOINE RI\ER 

La Moine River is a many-branched 
stream which drains the waters of several 
counties of western Illinois. The western part of 
the river is fonned by the La Moine Ri\er, 
sometimes called North Branch La Moine River, 
and the South Branch La Moine River. The main 
channel originates in western Warren County 
and flows in a southwesterly direction through 
Blandinsv ille Twp. The South Branch originates 
in Sec. 12 of Blandins\ille Twp. The two 
streams join in La Harpe Twp. of Hancock 
County from where the ri\er flows southwest 
and south through Hancock County. .After 
receiving numerous tributaries. La Moine River 
turns southeast and enters McDonough County 
in Lamoine Twp. 

The eastern part of the ri\er is also 
branched. The East Fork La Moine Ri\er 
originates in Sec. 2 of Sciota Twp. and flows 
east to Sec. 1 1 of Walnut Gro\e Twp. where it is 
joined by the North Fork (of the) Fast Fork 
which originates in eastern Warren County and 
crosses over into McDonough County in Sec. 3 
of Walnut Grove Twp. Fast Fork then turns 
south and southwest draining most of 
McDonough County. It joins La Momc l\i\er in 
Hancock Lwp.. Hancock Count\ . 

1 he main forks and branches oi' the 
n\er ha\e had iu:n)cri>us names oxer the \ears. 
In the west, the present La Moine Ri\er, which 
runs through sections 3, 4. 5, and 6 of 
Hlaiulms\ illc lwp.. was m 1834 and 1838 
known as Sandy Creek (Mitchell and Robinson 
maps), in 1 86S as Houston's Creek (Coulton 
map), m l'>l'> as North Branch Crooked Creek 
(USGS map), aflci ihal as lamoine. or 



La Moine Creek and finally as La Moine River. 
The South Braneh La Moine River, whieh flows 
through sections 12, 11, 15, 16, and 18 of 
Blandinsville Twp., was known as Bagby's 
Creek, after John Bagby who settled on Sec. 16 
in 1830, Coal Creek (1876 atlas). South Branch 
Crooked Creek, and South Branch Lamoine or 
La Moine Creek. 

The hierarchy of the main river channel 
and its many branches and forks was not 
established over many decades resulting in 
confusions which were reflected in the early 
names of streams. Thus the 1861 map of the 
county calls the East Fork La Moine River 
below the mouth of the North Fork "Centre 
Branch," while the present Short Fork is called 
"West Branch." These two names on a map 
produced by a local surveyor seem to confirm 
the early local assumption that Drowning Fork, 
now considered a tributary, was the east fork of 
the La Moine River. 

The main channel of the river has also 
undergone many name changes, from "Mine 
River" in 1812 to the present "La Moine" with 
an interlude in the 19"' Century when the river 
was called "Crooked Creek." There is also an 
uncertainty which part of the overall La Moine 
River system this latter name described. The 
name "Crooked Creek" appears first on the 
original survey plats of 1816. It was used in the 
name of the present Troublesome Creek in 
Scotland Twp. which was called "Middle Fork 
of Crooked Creek." Crooked Creek was thus 
used for all of East Fork, and ultimately for the 
present La Moine River as well. Local lore 
states that the name "Crooked Creek" was given 
during the early white settlement because it most 
aptly described the tortuous twists and turns of 
the stream, but white settlement of the area did 
not take place until the 1820s and 1830s. So it 
was probably the surveyor who originated the 
name, considering Crooked Creek to be a fork of 
the present main stream, i.e. LaMoine River. 
The first known occurrence of "Crooked Creek" 
on a published map was on the Melish map of 
1819 where the present La Moine River is called 
■'R. of la Mine or Crooked Creek." Peck in his 
gazetteer picks up the new trend when he writes: 
"The term creek is applied to this stream on the 
maps, and in the \ocabulary of the country" 
(Peck, 186). But the name "Lamoine" persisted 



in official use as seen on the 1856 survey map 
by the Surveyor General Office in St. Louis. 
Here, the name "Lamine River" appears in 
Lamoine Twp., but Troublesome Creek in 
Scotland Twp. is still called "Middle Fork 
Crooked Creek." The 1861 map of the county, 
produced by a local surveyor, calls only the 
lower reaches of the river "Lamoin." Ultimately 
"Crooked Creek" prevailed for all branches and 
forks, and even the main stream. Many older 
county residents still use "Crooked Creek" for 
the East Fork, and sometimes even for the main 
stream.. 

The La Moine River in Lamoine Twp, 
was in 1834 locally known as "Big River" 
(Commissioners: A/ 165), but on maps it was 
called "Lamoine," or some similar form. The 
origin of the name is obscure and has invited 
many speculations. The most often circulated 
story states that the name comes from the French 
version of the word monk - "moine" and that the 
river was named after Catholic monks who 
resided among Indians. An Indian settlement is 
known to have existed in Lamoine Twp. near the 
site of the Lamoine settlement and Jesuit priests 
are known to have ministered to the Indians of 
Illinois in the 18" century, but their centers were 
on the Mississippi and the Illinois rivers. The 
land between the two rivers was hard to cross 
due to extensive bottomlands and dense woods, 
and was dangerous because of warring tribes, so 
it is questionable whether monks resided among 
the Indian tribes away from the ri\er centers. In 
an effort to explain the origin of the name 
"Demoine" in Iowa, John F. McDermott, a noted 
scholar of the French era in the Mississippi 
Valley, presented yet another argument against 
the name "La Moine" meant to indicate the 
presence of monks. According to McDermott, a 
river on which religious missionaries to Indians 
lived would have been called "River des Piere," 
or River of the Fathers, as the Jesuit Order is 
called. Likewise, "no monks ever had anything 
to do with the Des Moines River ... of Iowa. 
The Moinginas tribe of Indians lived there, and 
the French merely cut their name down to 
'Moin" . . ." (McDermott, 1 982, 23 1 ). 

Old maps seem to offer clues as to how 
the name "La Moine" evolved. They indicate a 
gradual shift from the name "Mine River." 
which is the Eimlish form of the name and 



63 



appears on the Steven Long Map of 1812. to 
"River a La Mine" (1819 Melish), clearly a 
French adaptation, and finally to "La Moine 
River." The early post office in the area was 
called "La Mine" and "La Maine, " the latter 
probably a mistake. 

How "mine" and "maine" became 
"moin" is not known. A strict translation of 
"moin" from French means small, probably in 
reference to the Illinois River, but there is also 
some evidence that the name La Moine mimics 
the name of Iowa's Demoine Ri\ er with which it 
was confused by an 18' Century French 
cartographer (Frazer). The resulting name 
confirmed local belief that French monks lived 
among the Indians, unlikely as it was. The shift 
in the name is documented in written records, 
albeit not always totally reliable. Early maps of 
the Illinois River and its tributaries were 
particularly sketchy and misleading. Map 
makers made mistakes both in the naming and 
the location of streams and they frequently 
copied each other's work thus perpetuating 
inaccuracies. 

"Mine" rivers, referring to lead that the 
French mmed, are found in Galena and in 
Missouri. But, according to Hennepin, Indians 
dug coal on the Illinois River as early as 1679 
(Discovery), and when Patrick Kennedy 
explored the Illinois River in 1778 he listed a 
tributary from the West called "Mine River" 
(Kennedy, 53). By 1812 coal was beginning to 
be used for industrial purjioses, so in 1837 Peck 
informed the potential emigrants that 
"bituminous coal is found in great abundance 
along this stream and its tributaries (Peck, 187). 
When conflict arose about two "Mine" ri\ers in 
Illinois, (iaiena's Mine Ri\er pre\ ailed. 

in 1930 a controsersy about the official 
designatutn for the riser led to another major 
name change. Locally, the entire river system 
was known exclusively as "Crooked Creek." and 
it was so labeled by the U.S. Geological Survey. 
But the Illinois Department of Transportation, 
following an act of the Illinois General 
Assembly, called the nvcr "La Moine." .After 
an extensive survey of local usage and an 
investigation into how the name "La Moine" 
v\as adopted by the Illinois I egislature, it was 
tlecitled 111 1932 that the official name ol tiic 
ri\er should he la Moinc and lis forks and 



branches labeled accordingly (Correspondence 
between G. Rezab and the U.S. Board of 
Geographic Names, in WIU Archives). The 
decision must have been influenced by the fact 
that early names of the river were a form of the 
name "Lamoine." and also that there was 
another "Crooked Creek" in Illinois, a tributary 
of the Kaskaskia River in Clinton Co. 

Seventy some years later, however, this 
decision still awaits full implementation. While 
the Geological Sur\ey maps use the name "La 
Moine." and that name appears on highway 
signs, maps by the Illinois Department of 
Transportation and plat maps of the county still 
incorporate "Crooked Creek" in the names of 
some branches. 

See also Drowning Fork. 

LA MOINE RIVER SHORT FORK 

See Short Fork La Moine River. 

LAMOINE TOWNSHIP 

This is Congressional Township 
4North. Range 4West from the 4' Principal 
Meridian. The tov\nship was named for the 
Lamoine settlement, or the ri\er, preser\ing the 
old spelling. First settlers were Charles Hills 
and Da\id Fees on Sec. 12. Lamoine Twp. is 
the most timbered township in the countv. The 
flood plain of the La Moine Ri\ er on the south 
line of the township is the lowest ele\ation in the 
county. 

LAMOINE TOWNSHIP TOWN HALL 

This building is shown only on the 1913 
map. It was located on the west side of the SE 
quarter of Sec. 16. Nothing more is known 
about it. 

LAMOINE UNITED BRETHREN CHI RCH 

See Lamoine Chapel. 

LANCFORD'S HOISE MILL 

Ihis mill was located on Baptist Creek 
on the SL quarter of Sec. 34 m Biandinsville 
lup. It is mentioned first m 1834 when it is 
called Reading's Mill (Commissioners: A 183) 
after Francis Reailing. In 1834 Perr\ Langford 
bought the NI: part of the SI- quarter of Sec. 34 
(Deeds: B 106). Reterences to liie mill, called 
I anglord. ajipear in the Commissioners" Court 



64 



Records of 1835 and 1S36 (Commissioners: 
A223; 282). Langford is known to have died in 
1844 and John Rurk is listed m the 1850 U.S. 
Census as "millright" living in Daniel Hays' 
house. The Hays family had formed a little 
settlement in the adjacent sections 2 and 3 of 
Hire Twp. Clarke refers to this mill as having 
been built by Frank Redden as a grist mill 
operated by horse power. In 1879 the mill was 
owned by Peter Reiser. It is not known when it 
ceased to operate. 

See also Mills. 

LANGSFORD SCHOOL 

See Richard School. 

LANSDOWN CEMETERY 

See Simmons Cemetery. 

LANTZ CEMETERY 

See Lynn Grove Cemetery. 

LARGE CREEK 

This was the name of the East Fork La 
Moine River by the postmaster of Bruce Post 
Office in 1865 (Site). 

See La Moine River. 

LARKIN or LARKINS CEMETERY 

This is a private burial ground located 
just south of the McDonough-Warren County 
line on the NW quarter of Sec. 3 in Walnut 
Grove Twp. Burials date from 1858 to the 
1880s. The cemetery is named for John W. 
Larkins, who from 1854 to 1868 owned the 
property on which the cemetery is located. The 
cemetery contains graves of John Larkins and 
several members of the family (Grimm, 1991). 

LAWYER SCHOOL 

(No. 2, Tennessee Twp.; No. 1 17) 

This school started in 1847 when S.A. 
White deeded land on the NW quarter of Sec. 
26, (Deeds; L/305) where the school is shown on 
the 1861 map. In 1871 the school is on the SW 
quarter of Sec. 26, on land deeded by William 
Mourning in 1859 (Deeds: 28/29). The site is 
mentioned by Clarke as being District No. 2 
with a school building erected in 1869 ( p.431). 
The school appears in this location until 1913. 
The 1919 map shows it on the NE corner of the 



south haH\)f the Sli ciuarter of See. 33, where it 
stayed until the late 194()'s when it consolidated 
into the School District No. 117. In 1950 the 
property was sold to the trustees of the Lawyer 
Community Center (Deeds: 207/106), and in 
1986 it passed into private hands. 

The name derives from the John 
Lawyer family land on which the school was 
located. It was the nucleus for the "Lawyer 
Neighborhood" in the early 1900s. 

LEAD MINE ROAD 

See Ciaiena Road. 

LEARD FORD 

See Jones Ford. 

LEONARDSVILLE 

There is only one reference to this place 
in McDonough County. It was supposed to have 
been located on the road from Peoria to Quincy 
via Canton, and Ralls Mill in Schuyler County 
(Laws, 241). Ralls Mill, owned by William 
Ralls, is known to have been located on the 
present site of Birmingham in 1831 (Dyson, 
681). Maps of the period indicate a road from 
Canton to Macomb and continuing by the well 
documented Macomb-Quincy route. 

The name might have been a settlement 
or a paper town. 

LEWIS CEMETERY 

See White Flock Cemetery. 

LIBERTY CEMETERY 

This cemetery was established about 
1833 in connection with the newly organized 
Liberty Christian Church. The cemetery was 
located on tiie SE quarter of the SW quarter of 
Sec. 21 in Blandinsville Twp. in the Muddy 
Lane neighborhood. An 1848 gift of land I'rom 
Elijah Bristow to the Christian Church (Deeds: 
L/582) mentions the existence of the "burial 
ground" and the "Liberty Meeting House" where 
the Christian Church congregation worshipped. 
The cemetery, located one and one half miles 
from Blandinsville, contains graves of numerous 
original settlers of the Job Settlement. 



65 



LIBERTY CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

This congregation organized in 1832. 
The first house of worship was a joint 
undertaking by the Christian and the Baptist 
congregations (1885 History, 878). The place of 
worship was the Union Church or Union House, 
sometimes also called "Liberty Meeting House" 
in the Muddy Lane neighborhood. The new 
church was probably built in 1S48, the year of a 
land gift from Elijah Bristow to the "Christian 
Church worshiping at Liberty House" (Deeds: 
L/582). The building stood just north of the 
cemetery in the SE quarter of the SW quarter of 
Section 21 in Blandinsville Twp. In 1849 the 
congregation moved to Blandinsville and 
became the First Christian Church of 
Blandinsville (1885 History, 477). 

See also Union House, New Hope 
Baptist Church, and Old Bedford Christian 
Church. 

LIBERTY CHLRCH 

See Independent Baptist Church. 

LIBERTY METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

This church was built in 1865 on the SE 
comer of Sec. 13 in Blandinsville Twp., on land 
deeded by David W. Wright (Deeds: 21/321). 
The church closed its doors in 1933 and was torn 
down in 1936. The location is shown on all 
contemporary maps of the county. 

LIBERTY SCHOOL 

(No. 8, Blandinsville Twp.; No. 35) 

An 1857 land deed from Jesse W. 
Bagby to school trustees (Deeds: 4/723) places 
this school on the north side of the NF quarter of 
Sec. 23 where it is shown throughout its 
existence startuig ui 1 86 1. Although Clarke 
called the school "District No. 8," it seems to 
have been known as Liberty, deriving its name 
from the neighborhood. It consolidated into the 
Northwest FJistrict ui the late 1940"s. The 
school and the grounds were sold by trustees in 
1950 (Adair W. B., 2/2/1950). 



LICKSKILLET SCHOOL 

(No. 5, New Salem Twp.; No. 85) 

The first school in this neighborhood 
was Reedyville School located on the NE comer 
of Sec. 22. According to Clarke this was a log 
cabin that was moved in 1855 from Fulton 
County (Clarke, 419). The log cabin lasted only 
two years (1885 History, 924), and was replaced 
by a frame structure on land deeded by George 
Swango in 1859 (Deeds: 7/73). The I87I atlas 
shows this school on the NE comer of Sec. 21, 
where it is also shown in 1876. The 1881 school 
redistricting replaced the original Reedy\ille 
School district with two schools. One was built 
in 1881 on the NW quarter of the SW quarter of 
Sec. 22. and the other was built in 1884 on the 
SW quarter of Sec. 15, just east of Adair. The 
school on Sec. 22 became known as 
"Lickskillet," so named because after the district 
was subdivided Adair got most children and 
"left only a few for this area, making them feel 
they only received the lickuigs of the skillet" 
(1976 History, 38). The school is last shown on 
the 1922 county plat. It must have ceased to 
e.xist between 1922 and 1926 when it was not 
included in the listing of McDonough County 
schools (MDJ, 8/26/r926, p. 5), but no deeds 
could be found to \ erify the closing date. 

LINN GROVE 

See Lynn Grove. 

LITCHFIELD SCHOOL 

(No. 5, Chalmers Twp.; No. 105) 

Located on the NW corner of Sec. 22, 
this school is first shown in the 1871 atlas on 
land belonging to .Joseph Litchfield. A land girt 
from Thomas .1. Beard in 1867 (Deeds: 51 378) 
was probabK the binldrng date. The school 
remained in this location throughout its 
existence, but in the early 19()0s it was also 
known as Ritter School after Samuel Ritter 
whose land was located on the 1913 map just 
kitt\ comer th)m the school, llie building and 
the grouiuls were sold o\T m M)4'' (Deeds: 
206/14). 



66 



LITTLE CREEK (Blandinsville Tvvp.) 

This stream flows west through sections 
27, 33, 32, and 31 to empty into the La Harpe 
Creek in Fountain Green Twp. in Hancock 
County. 

LITTLE CREEK (Sciota and Wahuit Grove 
townships) 

Starting in Sec. 14 of Sciota Twp., this 
stream tlows east to joins the East Fork La 
Moine River in Sec. 8 of Walnut Grove Twp. 

LITTLE SCOTLAND 

See Scotland Township. 

LIZDEN CEMETERY 

See Mound Methodist Cemetery. 

LOCUST GROVE SCHOOL 

(No. 2, Walnut Grove Twp.; No. 1 1 ) 

This district was organized in 1 S63 and 
the building erected in 1864 on the SE comer of 
Sec. 4 (Clarke, 426), where it is shown on all 
county maps. An 1879 land deed from William 
Tracy transferred land ownership to school 
trustees (Deeds: 51/101), and a 1949 deed from 
the trustees marked the closing due to 
consolidation into the Blandinsville-Sciota 
School District No. 175 (Deeds: 85/719). The 
school was always known by this name. 

Locust is a native tree cultivated for its 
beauty, honey production and tough wood. 

See also Hickory Grove School. 

LOGAN SCHOOL 

See Center School (Sciota Twp.). 

LOGAN BURIAL GROUNDS 

See New Hope Cemetery. 

LOMBARD SCHOOL 

(No. 3, Sciota Twp.; No. 22) 

In 1867 the old Union District No. 2 was 
split into districts No. 3 and No. 4, the latter 
called "Muddy Lane"" (Clarke, 430). The 
schoolhouse, which in 1861 was located on the 
NW comer of Sec. 17, was moved to the NW 
comer of Sec. 8 on land purchased from David 
Sherbine in 1872 (Deeds: 35/78). The school 
remained in this location until 1947 when it 
consolidated into the Blandinsville-Sciota 



District ti 175. The grounds were sold off in 
1950 (Deeds: 213/227). 

"Lombard"" tlrst appeared on the 1929 
map. The name probably refers to Lombardy 
poplars, a variety of landscaping trees. 

See also Union districts (Sciota Twp.). 

LONG NINE SCHOOL 

(No. 8, Chalmers Twp.; No. 108) 

This school was established in 1866 on 
the NE quarter of Sec. 33 (Clarke, 428) on land 
donated by R.S. Ilorrcll (Deeds: 18/368). It is 
shown in this location on all but the 1893 map. 
The school was known by this name throughout 
its existence. It was part of the Long Nine 
Neighborhood, a name that persisted into the 
mid 1920s. The school was also called "Sim 
Strader School"" after Simeon Strader, an early 
school director and a nearby land owner. The 
grounds were sold off in 1950 (Deeds: 274/44). 

The name "Long Nine"" comes from a 
group of intluential Illinois lawmakers, one of 
whom was Abraham Lincoln. The group was 
instrumental in relocating the state capitol from 
Vandalia to Springfield. It is said that all 
members of this elite group were tall men. 

LOST GROVE CREEK 

This creek originates south of Bushnell 
and flows east through sections 34, 35, and 36 of 
Bushnell Twp. to join Shaw Creek in Sec. 30 of 
Lee Twp. in Fulton County. Another branch of 
the creek flows through sections 27 and 26. The 
origin of the name is not known. 

LOST TOWNSHIP 

This name, found only once (Clarke, 
588), was probably used for Walnut Grove 
Township. It commemorates an early incident, 
in which a small boy wandered off and was 
found after four days of searching in the densely 
wooded northeastern part of the township 

LOUISVILLE 

San^amo Journal for the 25 ' of 
February, 1847 (p. 2:2) carried a note that on 
Feb. 16, 1847 the Illinois House passed a bill "to 
vacate part of the town plat of Louisville, 
McDonough County."" No other reference to 
this name was found. 



67 



LOWER CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on private land 
on the south side of the SE quarter of Sec. 23 in 
Colchester Twp. The land was purchased by the 
Lower family in 1840. The earliest graves date 
back to the 1850s, being that of the wife and 
daughter of John J. Lower. The cemetery is 
shown only on the 1893 and the 1913 maps of 
the county. The name of the cemetery is all that 
remains of the "Lower Neighborhood," which, 
according to the 1885 history, had a school 
house as early as 1838, and which retamed its 
name well into the 20"" century. The cemetery is 
sometimes called Colchester South Cemetery. 

The 1974 USGS map mistakenly shows 
"Lower" cemetery on the NE quarter of Sec. 26 
in Colchester Twp. No cemetery is known here. 

LOWER RAPIDS 

Lower Rapids is not a name in the 
county, but it appears often m the early road 
records. It refers to the Des Moine Rapids of the 
Mississippi River. The head of the Lower 
Rapids was Commerce, later Nauvoo, and the 
foot of the rapids was Warsaw. Major early 
roads led to these important river crossings. 

See also Upper Rapids. 

LOWER RAPIDS ROAD 

See Rapids Road. 



LYNN GROVE 

This settlement seems to have started in 
the 1 840s when Abner Walker arrived there 
from the Macomb Twp. and Aaron Snodgrass 
created artificial lakes (1885 History. 105, 107). 
Land deed records show the neighborhood on 
the NE quarter of Sec. 14 in Walnut Grove 
Twp.. and the 1893 and the 1913 atlases show an 
impounded stream. Judging from the locations 
of the school, the church and the cemetery, this 
settlement was widely dispersed. 

"Lynn" is an obsolete forni of "linn," 
chiefly of Scottish origin. The word means 
torrent running over rocks, a ravine, or a lynn or 
linden tree, the latter probably the reason for the 
name. The Walker family was Scottish, and they 
came to McDonough County via the Irish Grove 
and the McClarey Grove settlements, thus 
probably influencing the choice of "Grove" as 
part of the name for their new home. 

LYNN GROVE CEMETERY 

This cemetery is on the NW comer of 
the NE quarter of Sec. 23 in Walnut Grove Twp. 
It is also known as Hageman Graveyard, Lantz 
Cemetery, or Lynn Center Cemeterv'. Jesse 
Hageman donated the land in 1868 (Deeds: 
27/146), and the earliest graves are those of the 
Hageman and Lantz families. The cemetery is 
shown on all county maps starting m 1S71. 



LUCE CITY SPRING 

North Vishnu Springs, the offlcial name 
of an addition to Vishnu, was located on the SE 
quarter of Sec. 7 in Tennessee Twp. It was also 
known as "Luce City," because it was platted by 
Dr. Isaac Luce in 1<S9(), and as "Loose City" in 
reference to the consumption of alcohol in the 
otherwise dry county (llallwas. 1984, 123-124). 
With a mineral spring located just east of the 
atldition, the place was also called Luce City 
Springs, as found on the 1892 marriage license 
of Joseph D. Carson and Sena Jarvis, both from 
Tennessee Twp. (Marriages: 6/47, 59). 

LUTHERAN CHURCH IN CHALMERS 
TOWNSHIP 

See Salcii) Church. 



LYNN GROVE METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

Also called "Lynn Grove Chapel." this 
congregation organized in 1861 and built their 
sanctuary in 1 868 on the NW quarter of Sec 24 
in Walnut Grove Twp, on land donated in 1870 
by Jesse Hageman (Deeds: 30 129). The church 
ceased to exist prior to 1937, when the grounds 
were sold (Deeds: 171 322). 

LYNN GRO\ E SCHOOL 

(No. 6, W ainut Grove Twp.; No. 16) 

This school was established in 1863 on 
the NW corner of Sec. 24. on land owned by 
William HageuKm. No land tlecds could be 
found. It closed m l')4~ when it consi>luiated 
with School Dislnct No. 4. 



LYNN CENTER C EMETER^ 

See I \nn (iro\e Cemeterv. 



I ANN POSrOFFIC E 

Sec Walnut (iro\e i'ost Office 



(>S 



M 



M. I. & L. RAILROAD 

See Macomb, Industry and Littleton 
Railroad. 

MACOMB 

The town of Macomb started as 
"Washington" when in June of 1830 it was 
proclaimed the "seat of justice" of McDonough 
County. It has remained the county seat until 
the present. The original plat of the town, dated 
1 83 1 . is located on the SW quarter of Sec. 3 1 in 
Macomb Township (Deeds: A/16-17). Because 
of mistakes in the original survey a new plat was 
entered by James W. Brattle on Dec. 13, 1834 
(Plats: 3/41), and it is this plat that is now in 
force. Later additions have extended the 
boundaries of the town so that now the 
incorporated area covers several square miles in 
four townships, centering on the original plat. 
Like numerous Midwestern towns, Macomb 
was, by design, planned to be in the center of the 
county, so as to be equally accessible to all 
county residents. 

The original name "Washington" 
remained in use only until December of 1830 at 
which time it was changed to McComb. This 
fonn of the name lasted until September of 1831 
when the present spelling was adopted. The old 
fomi of the name persisted, however, and even 
in 1836 the official plat of the town carried the 
name "McComb." The town was named after 
General Alexander Macomb, the commander of 
American forces during the War of 1812 and 
later the commander-in-chief of the army. A 
monument to General Macomb is located in 
Macomb's Chandler Park. 

MACOMB AND WESTERN ILLINOIS 
RAILROAD 

See Macomb. Industry and Littleton 
Railroad 

MACOMB COUNTRY ESTATES 

This is a Macomb subdivision located 
on the southwest part of Sec. 27 in Emmet Twp. 



MACOMB DISTRICT CAMP MEETING 
ASSOCIATION 

See Spring Creek Camp. 

MACOMB, INDUSTRY AND LITTLETON 
RAILROAD 

This railroad operated sporadically from 
1903 to 1932. The tracks ran south from the 
western edge of Macomb through Sec. 1 of 
Chalmers Twp. and then along the township line 
between Chalmers and Scotland and Bethel and 
Industry townships to the SE corner of Sec. 12 
in Bethel Twp. From here the tracks led east 
along the south border of sections 7, 8, and 9 of 
Industry Twp. then turned south through the 
middle of Sec. 22 crossing Carter Creek in Sec. 
27, and continued south to the county line 
between sections 33 and 34. In absence of hard 
roads, this railroad served as a freight line for 
farm products, but it also carried local passenger 
traffic. 

In later years of operation the line was 
known as Macomb and Western Illinois 
Railroad. 

MACOMB POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on 
November 4, 1831, with James M. Campbell as 
the first postmaster. Over the years the Macomb 
Post Office took over the functions of several 
smaller post offices in the county. 

MACOMB TOWNSHIP 

Congressional Township 6North, Range 
2West of the 4' Principal Meridian was first 
settled in 1830-1831 by James Fulton, Silas 
Hamilton, Alexander Harris and George Miller. 
When county commissioners in 1857 
reorganized the administrative structure of the 
county, they gave each township a distinct name. 
Macomb Township was named for the city of 
Macomb. 

MAGUIRE or MCGUIRE SCHOOL 
(No. 9, Macomb Twp.; No. 64) 

This school, originally known as 
Harmony, was built in 1863 on the SE quarter of 
Sec. 29 (Clarke, 426) on land deeded in 1864 by 
Theodore D. Knapp (Deeds: 13/307). It is not 
known when the name changed to Maguire. but 
the school was surrounded by Maguire land 



69 



holdings and the name persisted until its closing. 
The grounds were sold off in 1952 (Deeds; 
206/480). 

MAPLE GROVE METHODIST 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

See Guy Chapel. 

MAPLE GROVE SCHOOL 
(No. 4, Bushnell Tvvp.; No. 153) 

The earliest record of this school is an 
1865 deed from John M. Owens (Deeds: 
17/205). After reorganization into a union 
district, another school building was built in 
1875. Both buildings were located on the NE 
comer of Sec. 19 (Clarke, 423) where they are 
shown on maps from 1871 on. In 1947 Maple 
Grove School consolidated into Maple Hill 
School. The grounds were sold off in 1958 
(Deeds: 215/616). 

MAPLE GROVE SCHOOL (Emmet Twp ) 
See Oak Grove School (Emmet Twp.) 

MAPLE GROVE SCHOOL 

(No. 2, Scotland Twp.; No. 91) 

This school was established in 1856 and 
was first located on a knoll called Mount Nebo 
(Clarke, 423), but the building was soon moved 
one mile east to the SE comer of Sec. 4, onto 
land deeded in 1869 by John Barkley (Deeds: 
27/245). The school is shown in this location on 
all maps except the 1919 USGS map, where it 
appears just across the section line on the NE 
corner of Sec. 9 and the NW corner of Sec. 10, 
on land, which William Erwm deeded to trustees 
in 1869 (Deeds: 27/246). The 1940 location of 
the scht>ol was again in Sec. 4. The school was 
consolidated into the Scotland District No. 94 in 
March of 1947. It was sometimes called 
"Swamp School house." 

See also Mount Nebo. 



MAPLE HILL FREE-WILL BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

This congregation organized in 1875 
and met in the Maple Hill School House (Clarke, 
572). The church was not listed in the 1885 
history of the county, so its existence was 
probably a short one. It does not appear that a 
separate church sanctuary was ever built. 

See also Maple Hill School. 

MAPLE HILL SCHOOL 

(No. 1, Bushnell Twp.; No. 4; No. 206) 

A land gift by Levi S. Scott in 1857 
(Deeds: 55/286) is probably the starting date for 
this school located on the SE comer of Sec. 26. 
But the school is shown in this location only 
from 1893 on. It was also known as Tainter 
School (1976 History, 19), because it was the 
place of worship for the Maple Hill Free-Will 
Baptist Church with Benjamin Tainter as 
deacon. In 1947 Maple Hill became the school 
building for the Consolidated School District 
No. 4 which included Maple Grove. Bird, 
Number 5, and Lynn Grove schools. The 
grounds were sold off in 1957 (Deeds: 215/503). 

See also Union districts (Bushnell and 
Prairie City townships). 

MARIPOSA POST OFFICE 

This post office opened on October 29, 
1857 and discontinued operation on August 17, 
1858. The postmaster was William Knowles, 
who at the time owned land on the NE quarter of 
Sec. 5 of Industry Twp. which he acquired from 
John M. Walker. This post otTice is the 
successor to the Walker's Grove P. O. 

"Mariposa" is Spanish for buttertlv. It 
is a name used for a ri\er, a count\, and a town 
in California, but there is no explanation for this 
name in McDiniough Couiit\. unless to indicate 
a pleasant location or some personal connection 
with California. 

See alsi) Walker's Gro\e Post Office. 



MARTIN SCHOOL (Hire Twp ) 
See Argyle School. 

MARTIN SC HOOl 

(No. 4. rfiiiu'ssci' Twp.; No. 112) 

I his sciuHil was origiiialK known as 
Prentiss School aiul was located on liic NW 



70 



comer of Sec. 5, on land owned by Prentiss 
family. The school was built in IS.^S and 
remained in that location until 1857. At that 
time a new building was erected on the SE 
comer of the NW quarter of the SW quarter of 
Sec. 5. The school was renamed Martin after 
Reuben Martin on whose land it was situated. 
No deeds could be found to confirm the above 
dates and locations. 

See also Friendship Church. 

MATHEWS CEMETERY 

See Archer-Bethel Cemetery. 

MCCORD CEMETERY 

See Atkinson Cemetery. 

MCDONALD'S or MCDONALD & CO. 
MILL 

This mill seems to have been the 
successor to the James Clarke's Mill. The mill is 
mentioned several times by the County 
Commissioners, the first time in 1832 
(Commissioners: A/82). It was located on the 
East Fork La Moine River "within one mile of 
the Town of Macomb, where the road [Macomb- 
Carthage] crossed the Creek." The mill was 
above the crossing. According to Ale.x Holmes 
it was located on Milt McDonald's land and 
ceased operation prior to 1853 (MD.I, April 3. 
1925, p. 6). It was also called Baker and 
McDonald's Mill, McDonald & Baker's Mill, 
and McDonald & Archers Mill. An 1835 deed 
and an 1838 deed contlmi William McDonald as 
grantee for the SW quarter of Sec. 33 in Emmet 
Twp. (Deeds: B/96 and E/542). The 1861 map 
shows McDonald land holdings on the east half 
of the SW quarter and J.H. Baker holdings on 
the west half of the SW quarter of Sec. 33. 

See also James Clarke's Mill and Rice's 
Mill. 

MCDONOUGH COLLEGE 

Hills Grove Seminary and McDonough 
College were the earliest institutions of higher 
leaming in the county. The College was 
chartered by the Illinois General Assembly in 
1836 and the building was built by the Schuyler 
Presbytery in 1837. It was located in Macomb 
and lasted until 1855. It opened again in 1867 
and operated under many names until the 1910s. 



MCDONOUGH COUNTY 

McDonough County was established on 
the 25" of January 1826 by splintering off from 
Pike County. Administratively it remained 
attached to Schuyler County until 1830, at which 
time there were enough residents to form their 
own county government. The county was 
govemed by County Commissioners Court from 
1830 to 1849, by County Court from 1849 to 
1857, and by County Board of Supervisors from 
1857 on. Township government was established 
on November 4. 1 856. 

The borders of the county run west from 
the 4" Principal Meridian on the line between 
townships 3 and 4North to the line between 
ranges 4 and 5 West. From here the border runs 
north along the range line to the line between 
townships 7 and 8North, thence east along the 
township line to the 4"' Principal Meridian, and 
then south by the Meridian to the beginning. 
The county has 582 square miles and is divided 
into 16 congressional townships, but 18 
administrative townships. 

The county is predominantly upland 
prairie in the northern and eastern areas but 
exhibits considerable relief along stream banks 
in western and southern townships. The highest 
elevation is 790 feet above sea level on sections 
4, 5 and 6 in Sciota Township, and the lowest 
elevation is 490 feet along the La Moine River 
bottom in Section 34 of Lamoine Township. 
Except for a few small creeks on the eastem 
edge, the entire county is drained by the La 
Moine River, a tributary of the Illinois River in 
Schuyler County. The earliest white settlement 
in the county was on the forested sections of 
present Industry Township. 

The name is atler Commodore Thomas 
Macdonough, a hero of the Battle of Plattsburgh 
on Lake Champlain during the War of 1812. A 
monument to Commodore Macdonough is 
located in Macomb's Chandler Park. 

MCDONOUGH'S MILL 

This was a mill on the East Fork La 
Moine River, on the SW quarter of Sec. 17 and 
the adjoining SE quarter of Sec. 18 in Tennessee 
Twp. It is first mentioned by this name in 1836 
(Commissioners: A/258) and again in 1846 
(Commissioners: B/364). In 1836 the 
commissioners authorized that taxes be used to 



71 



build a bridge "over Crooked Creek at 
McDonough's Mill" and in 1846 they again ask 
that a bridge be built over Crooked Creek 
"where the road crosses at McDonough's mill." 
No mill or road is shown in this location on the 
1861 map, but a road is prominent on the 1871 
and later maps. The mill belonged to Peter and 
William McDonough. Peter McDonough 
transacted land on the SE quarter of the SW 
quarter of Sec. 1 7 in 1 845 (Deeds: Ky367). 

Another mill also on the SW quarter of 
Sec. 17 in Tennessee Twp. was Graves Mill. 
Mentioned in 1838, this mill was located in the 
center of the SW quarter of Section 17 in 
Tennessee Twp., "where the road crosses the 
creek" [i.e. East Fork La Moine River] 
(Commissioners: B/1), By December of 1856 
the mill was called "Graves Old Mill." Graves 
and McDonough's mills may have been a mill 
started by McDonough and taken over by Grave 
but this could not be confirmed. Land deed 
records for this quarter section do not show any 
Grave ownership, so Grave could have been the 
miller. Mills were commonly called by the 
name of the operator. 

MCGAUGHEY SCHOOL 
(No. 6, Industry Twp.; No. 141) 

This was one of the earliest schools in 
the county, dating back to 1834. All maps of the 
county show it on the SE comer of Sec. 4 on 
land owned by William C. McKamy, the name 
by which the school was sometimes known. No 
land deed, however, could be located. Clarke 
calls this school District No. 6, and says that it 
was organized in 1 860, but that must have 
happened after districts reorganized. The 1885 
history of the county places the schoollunise on 
Sec. 9. but again no land deed could be found to 
contlmi the location. The school consolidated 
into the Industry School District No. 165 in 
1950 and the building and grounds were sold the 
same year (Adau- W. B., 12/21/1950; Deeds: 
206/320). 

The name McGaughey is for .lohn (i. 
McGaughey, the father of many chihlrcn and a 
landowner on liie Nl' eiuarter of Sec. 9. jusl 
across the section hue iiom ihc McKamy laml. 
Both McKamy and McCiaughcy were sciiool 
directors. 



MCGINNIS CEMETERY 

See Old St. Paul's Cemetery. 

MCKAM(E)Y SCHOOL 

See McGaughey School. 

MCKEE SCHOOL (Emmet Twp ) 
See Bagby School. 

MCKEE SCHOOL (Macomb Twp.) 
See Prairie Hill School. 

MCMAHILL BURYING GROUNDS 

This is a private burial plot on the NE 
quarter of Sec. 1 1 in Walnut Grove Twp., on 
land that in the 1870s and the 1880s was owned 
by James and George W. McMahill. 

MCNAIR SCHOOL 

(No. 4, Scotland Twp.; No. 93) 

This school was built in 1857 on the 
NW comer of Sec. 20, on land deeded by Henry 
Compton (Mortgages: H/384). A new school 
was built in 1883 in the same location on land 
deeded by Nancy Walker (Deeds 47 595). The 
school site is shown on all maps from 1861 on. 
The school consolidated into the Scotland 
School District # 94 in March of 1947 and the 
grounds were sold off in 1952 (Deeds: 206/496). 

The name comes from Robert McNair, a 
landowner just west from the school site, and 
also one of the school directors. 

MEADOWBROOK 

This is a Macomb subdi\ision located 
on the west half of the NW quarter of Sec. 35 in 
Emmet Twp. 

MELVVOOD ESTATES 

This is a Macomb subtin ision located 
on Spring Lake, on the NW ciuarter of Sec. 15 in 
Emmet Iwp. 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHl'RCH 

(Chalmers Twp.) 

Sec Salem Church. 

MIDDLE RIDGF 

file upLiiRJ |iraiiics of much ol 
McDonouiih C'ounl\ came into e\islence when 
Ihc onuiiial (laieshum 1*1. un oi ulacial onmn 



72 



was drained by streams, which created the 
present parallel ridge and valley fomiations. 
The high ground, which stretches from northeast 
to southwest, between Troublesome Creek and 
Camp Creek is called Middle Ridge. The ridge 
runs through central Scotland, southeast 
Chalmers, and northwest Bethel townships. It 
served as a major travel route between 
Galesburg and Quincy. The route crossed the La 
Moine River on Sec. 21 in Lamoine Twp. 
Middletown, the early name of Fandon, is 
located on the north side of the ridge in 
Chalmers Twp. 

MIDDLETOWN 

See Edmonson's Prairie and Fandon. 



MILES CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the NF, 
quarter of Sec. 23 in Fldorado Twp. It is a 
family graveyard of the Martin Miles family and 
is now located on private land even though 
Martin Miles in 1S79, shortly after the death of 
his wife, donated land to the county "for a 
burying ground for the use of the neighborhood" 
(Deeds; 45/433). 

MILL BRANCH 

This name appears only once on the 
1864 plat of the SE quarter of Sec. S in 
Blandmsville Twp. (Deeds: 13/72). It is a 
tributary of the South Branch La Moine River. 

See also Millville Cemetery. 



MIDLAND SCHOOL 

(No. 1, Tennessee Twp.; No. 199) 

An early school in this vicinity was 
located on the SE quarter of Sec. 20 (Clarke, 
43 1 ) on land deeded in 1 844 by Catharine 
McDonough (Mortgages: B/428). After districts 
reorganized in 1868 the school was located on 
the north side of the S\V quarter of Sec. 21, on 
Larkin C. Bacon's land (Deeds: 25/482) and is 
shown here in 1871. It had several names. In 
the 1885 report by the county superintendent it 
was called "brick" (MDJ, 12/10/1885). On the 
USGS map for 1913 it was "Tennessee." But 
later maps call it Midland. It is not known when 
Midland School split mto Midland and 
IliUsgrove, both in District No. 199. The 
grounds passed mto private hands in 1950 
(Deeds: 207/126). The name probably derived 
from the school's location in the middle of the 
district. 

See also Hillsgrove School. 

MILAN 

See Good Hope. 

MILER GRAVESITE 

Martha Miler, a member of a wagon 
train traveling through the county, died in 1 840 
near Fandon and was buried northwest of town, 
on the SW quarter of Sec. 32 in Chalmers Twp. 
(Cemeteries, 5/40). The site is marked only on 
the latest USGS maps. It is a well-preserved 
monument on the side of the road. 



MILL CREEK 

See Sugar Creek. 

MILLER'S BRANCH 

This stream, a tributary of the East Fork 
La Moine River, originates on Sec. 27 of 
Macomb Twp. and flows cast and north through 
sections 23 and 14. The stream is named for 
George Miller, who owned land on Sec. 23. 
Miller, a mason by trade, built the second 
courthouse in Macomb. He was an influential 
early settler who became a Mormon bishop and 
left the county for Utah. 

MILLS 

Water-, horse-, and steam-powered mills 
were an important part of the county economy in 
the 19''' and the early 20 "' centuries. County 
commissioners platted roads so as to make mills 
readily accessible, and county maps show the 
location of the most important ones. They 
ground flour - primarily com - and sawed 
lumber. A mill often served both purposes. 
Water-generated mills had fi.xed locations. Their 
placement depended on favorable river banks 
and reliable water flow, and they involved 
considerable infrastructure. The damming of 
creeks and the resulting flooding required 
approval and licensing by county 
commissioners. 

Horse-powered and steam mills were 
used predominantly for sawing lumber and were 
moved to locations where logging took place. 
These mills appear m different locations at 



73 



different times and often are not identified by 
specific names. 

The millers and mills listed below are in 
chronological order, but many are mentioned 
with insufficient information to positively 
identify their locations. The better known ones 
are entered separately by name. 

In 1832 H. Hawkins was granted 
permission to build a mill on Sec. 30 of Macomb 
Twp. [present location of Macomb's Glenwood 
Park] (Commissioners, A/'90). Neremiah Hurd 
and Isaak Neece applied for permission to erect 
a dam and mill in 1835. David Chrisman 
applied tor permission to build mill and dam in 
1838 (Commissioners, B/i ), possibly on the NW 
quarter of the SW quarter of Sec. 19 in Industry 
Twp. Thomas Fisher had a saw and gristmill in 
Hire Twp. around 1844 (1885 History, 644). 
The U.S. Census, 1850. State of Illinois 
Products of Industry lists three water mills, four 
steam mills and six horse mills. The three water 
mills were the Pleasant Valley Mill and the 
Lamoine Mills which ground flour and the 
Robert Bean Mill which sawed lumber. 
According to the census. Moon and Martin 
operated a steam tlour mill. Harper Brothers 
sawed lumber with steam, and Stephen 
Gilliham, D. Runkle, Dunsworth Mathews, G. 
M. Gelloyd, and Hyram Latrum sawed lumber 
with horse power (Products of Industry). The 
1850 U.S. Census of population lists millers: A. 
Sidney Bonham, William Hammer, Joseph 
Carmack, Archibold R. Nichlus, Robert R. Bean, 
John Rurk, Thomas Kennedy, and James Hagan. 
The 1855 Illinois Census lists Samuel Farr 
operating a steam sawmill in Macttmb Twp. 
The 1860 U.S. Census on Population lists John 
Foster as miller in Tennessee Twp. with post- 
office address m Colchester, William Proxine 
also in Tennessee Twp. with post-office address 
in Tennessee, B. Camp in Chalmers Ivvp. with 
post-otTice address in Macomb, Joseph Simpkin 
with post ofl'ice address in Colchester, and 
Andrew Crawford with post office address in 
Middleton. Ihe 1865 Illinois Census lists 
(). Young operating a saw null and .'\. Foster 
operating a tnmmnig null both m fcniicssec 
fwp., J.R. Nichols operating a grist and saw 
mill in Lamoinc fwp , aiul Robert Saflle 
operating a sa\s mill m Chalmers Iwp. 1 he 
1871 atlas lists SM Riilcils on Sec. 8 in 



Blandinsville Twp.. Da\id Newell on Sec. 17 in 
Emmet Twp, Samuel Purdum on Sec. 25 in 
Lamoine Twp., William J. Merritt in Bardolph, 
and John R. Nichols on Sec. 21 in Tennessee 
Twp. 

By 1870s flour mills increasingly 
operated within towns and villages and were 
powered by steam. Saw mills, however, were 
still located near timber. Chester Stocking set 
up a steam saw mill near where Clarke's saw 
mill used to operate (MJ 1/12 1905). 

Some mills could not be identified at all. 
A mill and ■"sawmill" is shown from 1861 to 
1876 on the NW comer of the SE quarter of Sec. 
6 in Tennessee Twp. on Cedar Creek and a 
"Saw and gristmill" is shown in 1861 on the NE 
quarter of Sec. 22 in Tennessee Twp. just east of 
Tennessee. 

See also Bacon Mill, Clarke's Sawmill, 
Eyre's Sawmill, Hagan's Sawmill, Hammer 
Mill, Harlan Horse Mill, Hopper's Mill, 
Hummer's Mill, James Clarke's Mill, Lamoine 
Mills, Langford's House Mill, McDonough's 
Mill, McDonald's Mill, Newell's Mill, Phelps 
Mill, Pleasant Valley Mills, Provine Mill, 
Purdum Sawmill, Rice's Mill, Sears Sawmill, 
Vance's Mill, and Wilson's Mill. 

MILLVILLE CE^IETER^ 

This cemetery, whose name indicates a 
settlement, was supposed to ha\e been located 
on Sec. 8 in Blandins\ille Twp. and is shown on 
the 1861 map as a small cluster of buildings 
around a mill. The mill probably started in 1845 
when D. Seybold purchased two acres on the NE 
corner of the SW quarter of Sec. 8 in 
Blandinsville Twp (Deeds: 15 176). The 1850 
Census lists Sevbold as "sawyer of logs." and 
this is confirmed in 1856 when Dolton Se\bold 
is said to ha\e owned a "steam nnll" (RSR, 
175). In 1855 Dotson (sic) Seybold ottered his 
mill for sale (MJ. 4 13 1855. p. 4). The mill was 
a saw- ami gristmill run hy steam, ha\ing 
attached to it "a wool and carding machine." An 
1S64 plat of the SE quarter of Sec. 8 shows 
Dolton -Seybold as the owner of a property, on 
the NW corner, but in the 1871 atlas (he mill is 
locateil on the Nl- corner iif the SW quarter and 
SM. Rulerts is listed as miller on Sec. 8 in 
BlaiuliiisN illc 1 wp. 



74 



MINE RIVER 

See La Moine River. 

MINERAL SPRINGS 

There were at least two known mineral 
springs in the county, one at Vishnu Springs, 
and the other on the Orrin Peck farm on the SE 
quarter of Sec. 21 in Chalmers Twp. Both 
locations were developed by their owners to 
serve as health and recreation sites and 
flourished in the 1880"s, when it was 
fashionable to drink mineral waters in order to 
cure diseases. Peck Springs were supposed to 
cure "Bright's disease ... and every curable 
ailment" (1885 History, 819). Peck Springs was 
never shown on any map and there is no later 
mention of it. 

See also Vishnu. 

MISSISSIPPI & WABASH VALLEY R.R. 

See Toledo, Peoria, and Western 
Railway. 

MISSISSIPPI VALLEY HIGHWAY 

According to the 1923 Illinois Official 
Auto Trails Map this was the name for the hard 
road from Beardstown to Burlington. The road 
went by way of Rushville, Littleton, Industry, 
Macomb, Good Hope, and Roseville. The trail 
was identified by a rectangle divided into three 
horizontal stripes, two white and an orange in 
the middle with letters: M V H. 

See also Abe Lincoln Trail, Cannonball 
Trail, and National White Wav. 



MOORE CEMETERY (Eldorado Twp.) 
See Dai ley Cemetery. 

MOORE CEMETERY (Colchester Twp.) 

This cemetery is located on the NE 
quarter of Sec. 14, just west of Colchester, 
where it is shown on county maps from 1871 on. 
The cemetery was named for Mary Moore, 
whose second husband, Schuyler B. Moore, was 
buried there in 1 848, only five years after his 
marriage to Mary. The 1850 census lists Mary 
as head of household, 39 years old, and having 
seven children. Twice widowed, she must have 
commanded great respect to have had the 
cemetery named after her. She was also buried 
there in 1863. 

The cemetery is sometimes called Old 
Colchester or Widow Moore Cemetery. 

MOUND CHAPEL METHODIST 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

This congregation organized in 1854 
and met in private homes and in the "Old 
Sixteen" schoolhousc until 1869, at which time 
it built a sanctuary on the SW comer of the NW 
quarter of Sec. 22 in Mound Twp. (1885 
History, 460) on land deeded in 1866 by Arthur 
J. Fleming to the "M. E. Church at what is 
known as Dyer Appointment" (Deeds: 29/250). 
All county maps show the church in this location 
from 1871 to 1913. The building stood until the 
early 1920s when it was destroyed by a tornado 
(Harris, M.). The church was rebuilt, but was 
sold off in 1942. 



MONTEE CEMETERY 

See Pioneer Cemetery. 

MONTICELLO 

A settlement by this name is shown on 
Colton's map for 1839 and several other maps in 
the 1860s as located on the SE quarter of Sec. 4 
in Eldorado Township. The site, later the 
location of the Nevada School, belonged to Joab 
Mershon, a member of a large and prosperous 
Quaker family from Pennsylvania which settled 
in Vermont, Illinois. No town plat and no 
reason for this name could be found. The name 
is probably after Monticello, the famous home 
of Thomas Jefferson. 



MOUND CHAPEL CEMETERY or 
MOUND CHAPEL METHODIST 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH CEMETERY 

See Mound Methodist Cemetery. 

MOUND CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

This congregation organized in 1857 
and met in school houses until 1 864 when a 
sanctuary was built on the NW comer of the NE 
quarter of Sec. 26 in Mound Twp., where it is 
shown on the 1871 map. The gift of land from 
James Langford, however, was not executed 
until 1879 (Deeds: 51/212). In 1888 the church 
was moved to New Philadelphia and renamed 
Philadelphia Christian Church (Peter, 173). 



75 



MOUND METHODIST CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the NW 
quarter of Sec. 22 in Mound Twp. on land v\hich 
Andrew J. Fleming deeded in 1875 to the 
Mound Chapel M. E. Church for the purpose of 
laying out a cemetery (Deeds: 47/471). An 1874 
plat, called "Mound Chapel Methodist Episcopal 
Church Cemetery," is shown in Plat Records 
(Plats; 2/5). The cemetery is sometimes called 
Lizden Cemetery. Fleming wife's name was 
Eliza. It is not known whether this intluenced 
the otherwise une.xplainable alternate name. 

MOUND METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

See Pleasant Mound Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

MOUND SCHOOL 

(No. 3, Mound Twp.; No. 75) 

This school might ha\e started in 1851 
with a deed from Job Combs for the NW comer 
of the SW quarter of Sec. 13 (Deeds: Q/303). 
The school is shown in this location from 1861 
through 1919. Clarke's history calls this district 
"White Hall" (Clarke, 419). White Hall 
schoolhouse is known to have served as a 
meeting place for the Mound United Brethren 
Church. The school consolidated mtt) the Sperry 
District No. 71 in June of 1946 and the groimds 
were sold m 1948 (Deeds: 190/572). 

MOUND TOWN HALL 

This town hall was located on the SE 
corner of the NE quarter of Sec. 21. It is shown 
on maps from 1893 to 1913. 

MOUND TOWNSHIP 

Ihis is Congressional Township 
6North. Range I West of the 4"' Principal 
Meridian. The township was first settled in 
1832 on Section 18. The earliest settlers were 
Joseph Smith, the Kepple lamily, Durham Creel, 
ami I'dward Dyer. 

The township was named for the 
elevation on the SI' quarter of Sec. 14. which is 
clearly visible from all directions, fhe mound is 
of glacial origin. It is part of glacial moraines 
which trend north south through the eastern 
margins of the county. I he nuniiKi was known 



as Dyer's Mound, because it was the site of 
Edward Dyer's homestead. 

MOUND UNITED BRETHREN 
CEMETERY 

See Upper Mound Cemetery. 

MOUND UNITED BRETHREN CHURCH 

This church, like the cemetery located 
nearby, has been known by several names. An 
1867 land deed from James Lemaster (Deeds: 
25/429) was issued to the Church of the United 
Brethren in Christ. Other names used over the 
years were Dyer Church, after the Dyer family. 
High Mound, Upper Mound, and finally Mound 
United Brethren Church (MDJ 9/19/1898, p. 3). 
The congregation organized in the 1860's and 
first met in White Hall, the early name of 
Mound School. The sanctuary built in 1868 on 
the NW corner of the SE quarter of Sec. 14. in 
Mound Twp., is shown on all county maps from 
1871 to 1919. In 1930 the congregation moved 
to New Philadelphia, changed its name in 1954 
to New Philadelphia Evangelical United 
Brethren Church, and in 1968 to New- 
Philadelphia United Methodist Church. 

See also Mound School. 

MOUNT AUBURN CEMETERY 

Mount Auburn is the present cemetery 
for the town of Colchester. It is located on the 
NW comer of the SE quarter of Sec. 12 in 
Colchester Twp. It started with a 10-acre deed 
in 1881 (Deeds: 46/592), and an 1882 plat 
(Plats: 2/79). The first burial was in 1885 
(Moon, 28). Mount Auburn replaced Moore 
Cemetery as Colchester's main cemetery. 
According to Moon, the name was chosen 
among several votes placed into a hat. It is 
possible that the name was suggested because of 
the famous Mt. .Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, which was the first park4ike 
cemetery in the country. The Colchester 
cemetery had a picket fence and an arched 
entrance and was proudly featured on post cartis. 
It is the final resting place ot the ccial mmmg 
Icailer James Roberts .uul locallv taiiunis 
bexillcggcr KelK Wagic 

".Auiniin" was a name poinilan/cd by 
Oliver (ioldsmith in his 1770 poem, "The 
Descried \ lihiuc." which siarls with "Sweet 



76 



Auburn, loveliest village of the plane...." The 
word originally meant "whitish," hut has 
increasingly meant reddish-brown. '■N'U>unt" is a 
poetic form of Mound. 

MT. CARMEL or MT. CARMEL SKI 
LODGE 

This was a locally-known ski resort 
located in Colchester Township on the south end 
of the line between sections 25 and 26. It 
featured a long slope, a tow rope, and a family 
operated ski lodge. The lodge opened in 1964 
and closed in 1978. The name comes from Mt. 
Carmel Church which stood nearby (MJ 
1/16/2005, p. 1). 

MOUNT CARMEL CUMBERLAND 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

This church was located on the north 
side of the NW quarter of Sec. 36 in Colchester 
Twp. on land deeded by Samuel Copland in 
1892 (Deeds: 71/509). Apparently there was an 
early church built in 1852 by the same people 
who built the Bersheba Church (1992 History, 
530), but no records of this church have 
survived. The 1892 deed from Samuel Copland 
was probably the starting date for the new 
sanctuary. The church is shown in the 1893 
atlas and as late as 1922. Church records e.xist 
up to 1928. It is not known when it ceased to 
t\inction. 

Mt. Carmel is a religious commendatory 
name after the Biblical mountain in Israel, 
famous for its caves which housed Christian 
hennits. 

MT. HOLLY SCHOOL 

See Holly Hill School. 

MOUNT NEBO 

This is a knoll on the SW quarter of Sec. 
4 in Scotland Twp. The knoll forms a high 
ground between tributaries of the Troublesome 
Creek. Steep ravines to the east, west and south 
intensify the otherwise slight elevation of the 
mound. 

In the Bible, Mount Nebo is the 
mountain from which Moses saw the promised 
land. The name is used for land features and 
habitations. The view from the mound might 
have atfected the name. 



See also Maple Grove School (Scotland 



Twp.). 



MT. PISGAH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 
CHURCH 

Mt. Pisgah Congregation organized in 
1871 and met in the Jerusalem Church until 
1875 when it moved to Macomb and was 
renamed Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church 
(Peter, 1 16). It seems that prior to the move to 
Macomb the church was also known as German 
Lutheran Church of Macomb Township. 

Pisgah is the mountain range in Israel of 
which Mt. Nebo is the highest peak. 

MOUNT PLEASANT SCHOOL 
(No. 3, Biandinsville Twp.; No. 33) 

This school was erected in 1855 on the 
SE comer of Sec. 18 and the NE comer of the 
NE quarter of Sec. 19 on land donated in 1858 
by Adonijah Hungate and .lohn Duncan (Deeds: 
5/257). It is shown in this location on all county 
maps starting in 1861. The school was already 
known by this name to Clarke (p. 433). It closed 
in 1955 when the land was sold by trustees 
(Deeds: 215/318). 

MOUNT PLEASANT SCHOOL 

(Macomb Twp.) 

See Crabb School. 

MOUNT SOLON METHODIST CHURCH 

See Greenwood Church. 

MOUNT SOLON or 
MOUNT SOLAN SCHOOL 
(No. 2, Macomb Twp.; No. 61) 

This school seems to have started in 
1855 as "Collins School" in District No. 7 (1885 
History, 997). There is also reference to Collins 
School as the first meeting place of the 
Jerusalem Church (1885 History. 487). The 
building was probably located on the NW 
quarter of Sec. 11, where Joseph Collins had 
extensive land holdings. Mount Solon School, 
built probably in 1 866 after school district 
reorganized (Clarke, 424), was located on the 
NE quarter of Sec. 10 where it appears on all 
maps from 1871 on. In 1898 Levi Shrincr 
apparently added to the school grounds by 
leasing land just south of the NW quarter 



77 



(Miscellaneous: 2/473). The school operated 
until 1948 when it consolidated with the 
Bardolph Grade School (Jerusalem, 39). The 
lease was terminated in 1949 (Miscellaneous: 
22/159) and the land passed back into private 
hands in 1950 (Adair W. B., 2/2/1950; Deeds: 
198/77). 

Solon was one of the Seven Sages of 
ancient Greece. He was a statesman and 
promoter of education. 

See also Greenwood Church. 

MT. ZION CHURCH 

This Free Methodist Church in the Gin 
Ridge neighborhood was dedicated on July 6, 
1922 on land donated in 1921 by Thomas 
Stoneking, and located on the SE comer of the 
SW quarter of Sec. 33 in Bethel Twp. (Deeds: 
136/418). The church was at first non- 
denominational and called Siesta, after the post 
office in the vicinity. For financial reasons it 
had to declare a denomination and became Free 
Methodist. It ceased to function in the late 
1930s (Willey). The land was sold in 1941 
(Deeds: 174/442). 

Mount Zion is a Biblical name for a hill 
in Jerusalem. The name is often used for 
churches. 

MT. ZION SCHOOL 

(No. 5, Bethel Twp.; No. 136) 

This school was first located on the SE 
quarter of Sec. 34, where it is also shown on the 
1871 map. A land deed record from Isaac 
Morgan is dated 1868 (Deeds: 27/503). In 1874 
the school was moved to the SW comer of the 
SE quarter of Sec. 33, where it became a union 
school of McDonough and Schuyler counties, 
remaining in this latter location until its closure. 
It ct)nsolidated with the Bethel School District 
No. 133 in May of 1947. The building was sold 
in 1950 (Adair W. B., 12/21/1950), but no deeds 
could be found. This school was also known as 
(iui Ridge School. 

M ( ) LI K N I N G C F M FT K R V 

See Frientlship (cniclcry. 



MUD ACRE SCHOOL (No. 6, Eldorado 
Twp.; No. 155) 

This school was built in 1872 on the SE 
comer of Sec. 14, but no deed could be located. 
The school remained in the location throughout 
its existence. The building was on the low-lying 
bank of a creek, which would explain the 
descriptive name. In March of 1947 the school 
was consolidated into the Eldorado School 
District # 154 and the grounds were sold in the 
same year (McDonough C. T.. 10/23/47; Deeds: 
190/464). 

MUD CREEK 

In 1857 the County Commissioners 
Court was asked to aid Walnut Grove Twp. in 
rebuilding two bridges, one over Mud Creek and 
another over "Bush" Creek (Commissioners: 
D/278). The 1861 map of the county shows four 
bridges: over "Centre Branch," another over the 
present North Fork of East Fork La Moine 
River, one bridge over "West Branch," now 
Short Fork, and one bridge over present Town 
Fork, which is not named on the map. Since 
Town Fork is known to have been called Brush 
Creek, Mud Creek must have an alternate name 
for the present Short Fork of the East Branch La 
Moine River. 

See also Short Fork. 

MUDDY LANE 

This was the name of a settlement in 
Blandinsville Twp. John Regan in his 
Emiurant's Guide relates: "About half a mile in 
the timber we arrived at the house of — Bristo, 
of Muddy Lane (and a muddy lane it certainly 
was that evening)" (Regan. 49). The year was 
around 1840 and the place the NF quarter of 
Sec. 21 in Blaiulins\illc Tup., where Elijah 
Bristow settled in 1828. The name of the 
location is confirmed b\ Burr's map oi' 1839, 
Chapman's map of 1857, and Colton's map of 
1868. Regan also mentions "Brother Bagly," i.e. 
John Bagby, as being part of the settlement - 
Bagby is known to ha\e settled on the NE 
quarter of .Sec. 9 - and he also mentions 
"Perkin's .School, lour miles distant from 
Bristow. and two miles llinnigh the wnods from 
Bagln." .luiignig by this, the Muildy fane 
settlement was situateil north ol Blaiulmsv ille 
and was lalhei wideK dispersed It was a 



78 



settlement centered on the intersection of the 
road from Nauvoo to Fllisville and tVoni 
Macomb to Burlington, vvhicli are shown on 
Colton's map of 1839 as roads through the 
township. 

The settlement probably derived its 
name from the condition of the Fllisville road. 
John Regan described it vividly. "The roads are 
nothing more than wagon tracks upon the bare 
soil, and the rain has made ours so soft and 
sticky, that we had to walk upon the grass, 
choosing rather to get completely wet up to the 
knees, than walk through a continuous mud 
puddle" (Regan, 48-49). 

MUDDY LANE POST OFFICE 

A post office by this name was 
established on May 27, 1837 with Elijah Bristow 
as postmaster. Burr's map for 1839 shows it in 
the middle of present Blandinsville Twp. In 
1842, when it seems to have been reestablished, 
the postmaster was John G. Woodside, who 
lived on the NW quarter of Sec. 9 in 
Blandinsville Twp. On April 6, 1848. Muddy 
Lane changed its name to Bedford and relocated 
to Henderson County. It became Muddy Lane 
again on July 20, 1849 with Woodside as 
postmaster, and finally discontinued on May 20, 
1854. It appears as late as 1864 on Schonberg's 
map which underscores how dated the 
information was on some of the maps. The post 
otTice was two miles distant from "Muddy 
Lane" on maps. 

MUDDY LANE SCHOOL 

(No. 4, Sciota Twp.; No. 23) 

This district was organized in 1867 
when the Union District No. 2 with schoolhouse 
on the NW comer of Sec. 17 as shown on the 
1861 map, split into Lombard School and 
Muddy Lane School. The school house was 
built in 1867 and is shown in the 1871 atlas on 
the SW comer of Sec. 17 on land which J. A. 
Mustain gifted to the trustees in 1901 (Deeds: 
92/507). An 1881 deed from Able James 
(Deeds: 46/266) located the school grounds on 
the NE comer of Sec. 19, which remained the 
school location until its closure in 1947 when it 
consolidated into the Blandinsville-Sciota 
District No. 175. 



The name of the school, already in 
Clarke (p. 430), identincs it as part of the widely 
dispersed neighborhood t>f Muddy Lane. 

Sec also Union districts (Sciota Twp.). 

MULE RIDGE 

The deeply incised Camp and 
Grindstone creeks are separated in Bethel Twp. 
by a narrow strip of upland extending from 
northeast to southwest. Like other ridges in the 
south-western part of the county, this ridge 
served as high ground upon which traffic moved 
in the early 19" Century, hence the name. 

MURRAY CRAVESITE 

A stone marking the graves of John F. 
and Elizabeth Murray is located on the NW 
quarter of Sec. 16 in Chalmers Twp. on Murray 
land from 1864 to 1896. 

MUSTAIN CEMETERY 

A single marker lists three graves, that 
of John and Eli/abeth Mustain who died in the 
1860s, and of their daughter who was buried in 
1845. The marker is located at the center of the 
NW quarter of Sec. 16 in Blandinsville Twp. 

MYRON POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on Feb. 
3, 1894 with Jesse B. Calvert on the SW quarter 
of the NW quarter of Sec. 20 in Emmet Twp. as 
postmaster. It closed on September 26 the same 
year. Macomb tiH>k over its function. 



79 



N 



NATIONAL WHITE WAY 

This was a hard road shown on the 
Illinois Official Auto Trails Map of 1923. The 
road went from Canton to Carthage by way of 
Bushnell, Bardolph. Macomb and Colchester. It 
was identified by a rectangle with three 
horizontal stripes: black, white, and black. 

See also Abe Lincoln Trail, Cannonball 
Trail, and Mississippi Valley Highway. 

NAYLOR CEMETERY NO. 1 

This burial ground is located on the SW 
quarter of Sec. 29 in Emmet Twp. on Benjamin 
T. Naylor land. Burials date from 1838 on. It 
is not known who is buried here. 

NAYLOR CEMETERY NO. 2 

The small burial plot is located on the 
SW quarter of Sec. 33 in Emmet Twp. on James 
}\. Bacon Land. Neither Naylor Cemetery is 
marked on any maps. 

NEECE or NEESE CEMETERY 

This cemetery started as the family 
graveyard for the Jesse Neece family. It is 
located on the NW quarter of the NW quarter of 
Sec. 30 in Colchester Twp. Death dates 
recorded on grave stones are from the 1820s to 
the 1920s. In 1869 J. Neece donated the 
grounds to McDonough County "permanently 
establishing a grave yard or burying ground for 
themselves, their heirs and their relatives" 
(Deeds: 29/275). The cemetery is shown on the 
1 893 and the 1913 atlases of the county. 

neece'S(;rove 

This was a Methodist camp meeting 
place around 1900. It was located on the Neece 
family land, two miles south of Colchester, on 
the NW (.|uarter of Sec. 30 m Colchester Twp. 

NEVADA SCHOOL 

(N().2 Eldorado I w p.; No.l51) 

I his school was K)caled on the SE 
corner ol Sec. 4. An 1861 land deed by Joab 



Mershon is probably the starting date (Deeds: 
35/526). The school operated in this location 
until March of 1947 when it was consolidated 
into the Eldorado School District #154. The 
grounds were sold off in 1951 (Deeds: 206/401). 
"Nevada" is Spanish for snowy. No 
reason is known for this naming. 

NEW BARDOLPH CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the NW 
comer of the NE quarter of Sec. 24 in Macomb 
Twp. Early burials predate 1856 when the 
cemetery was formally established. In 1879 
McDonough County deeded the cemetery to the 
Village of Bardolph (Deeds: 47/116). The 
cemetery is still in use. 

NEW BEDFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

This church organized in 1871 at the 
Aten School and built its sanctuary in 1876 on 
land deeded in 1880 by John S. Brooks (Deeds: 
48/145). It was located on the NW comer of Sec. 
7 in Walnut Grove Twp. in the Bumsville 
neighborhood. It is listed by Clarke (p. 530) and 
again in 1883 (MJ, 2/8/1883) and is shov\n on 
the 1893 atlas of the county. The church closed 
the same year and the building mo\ ed to Raritan 
(MDJ, 2/9/1893, p. 5). 

The name was probably gi\en to 
differentiate between this and the Old Bedford 
Church in Blandins\ ille Twp. The 1885 history 
calls the church "New Bradford." 

NEW ERA SCHOOL 

(No. 9, Bethel Twp.; No.LM) 

A school in this \icinity is first shown in 
1856 (R.S.R., 151). and on the 1861 map. It was 
located on the SE comer of the NE quarter of 
Sec. 3. Wiien the original District No. 1 split 
into districts No. 1 and 9, the school appears on 
the NE corner o\' Sec. 9. In 1940 "New Era" 
school is located on the NE comer of the SE 
quarter of Sec. 9. No deeds were fouiui to 
establish the dates of relocations. 

The name rellects an optimistic attitude 
towards lutinc. or a new beginning. It is not 
known when the school was named. 

See also (Ullage C\>rner School. 

NEW HOPE 

See Job's Selllemenl. 



80 



NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH 

This congregation organized in 1 830 
and for the first nine years met in the "Union 
House," an interdenominational iiouse of 
worship built by Baptists and Retbrmers or 
Campbellites in the neighborhood of Muddy 
Lane. In 1839 Robert Seybold donated land to 
the New Hope Baptist Church "for the purpose 
of a church and burial ground" (Deeds: F/106). 
The plot was on the SW corner of the NW 
quarter of Sec. 4 in Hire Twp., in the middle of 
the old .lob's Settlement (Clarke, 19). The 
building burned in 1868. In 1870 members 
reorganized and formed the First Baptist Church 
of Blandinsville. 

This church was named after the church 
in Simpson County, Kentucky, where John 
Logan was baptized in 1819 (1885 History, 
465). 

See also Job's Settlement, Muddy Lane, 
and Union House. 

NEW HOPE CEMETERY 

This cemetery was the oldest burial 
ground for Job's Settlement and Blandinsville. 
It is also called Baptist Cemetery No. 2, South or 
Old South Cemetery, Logan Burial Ground, and 
Foster Cemetery. It is located on the SW corner 
of the NW quarter of Sec. 4 in Hire Twp. 

The various names reflect the history of 
the cemetery. It was established in 1837-38 in 
connection with the New Hope Baptist Church 
(1885 History, 647). Over the years it became 
the burial ground of the large Baptist community 
in the vicinity, including John Logan, the 
prominent Baptist preacher. The name "South" 
reflects its location as opposed to the Glade City 
Cemetery on the northeast side of Blandinsville. 
"Foster" comes from the 1905 addition to the 
cemetery called Foster's (Plats: 3.19). 

See also New Hope Baptist Church. 

NEW HOPE METHODLST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

This church started in the 1830s as 
Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church. The 
sanctuary was built in 1845 on the SE quarter of 
Sec. 7 (Clarke, 549). An 1847 gift of land from 
James II. Dunsworth to "M. E. C. of the 
Macomb Circuit ... to be used for house and 
place of worship ... or as school" places the 



church on the SW corner of the NE quarter of 
Sec. 7 in Ik-thel Twp. (Deeds: L/326), where it 
is shown on the 1861 map as "church and 
school." The building burned in 1863. The 
congregation reorganized in 1 866 under the 
name of New Hope Methodist Episcopal 
Church. The following year it built a new 
sanctuary on the SE quarter of the NE quarter of 
Sec. 4 in Bethel Twp (Clarke, 549) on land 
donated in 1867 by William J. Horrell "for the 
use of the New Hope M. E. Church and all other 
Orthodo.x Societies" (Deeds: 31/503). The 
church is shown in atlases of 1871 and I 893. 

New Hope Church was also home [o the 
First Baptist Church of Bethel Twp. until 1X76. 
It IS not known when it closed. 

See also Bethel Baptist Church. 

NEW PHILADELPHIA 

A town by this name was laid out by 
Lloyd Thomas in 1858 on the SE quarter of Sec. 
23 in Mound Twp. (Plats: 1/44) to serve as a 
station on the proposed Mississippi and Wabash 
Railroad. Prior to the plat the location was 
known as "Thomas Corner or Crossroads" 
(Newsletter 6:3/8). When the railroad bypassed 
the town site one half mile to the north, James 
H. Langford laid out in 1869 "The Town of 
Grant" ne.xt to the rail line, on the SE quarter of 
Sec. 23 (Plats: 1/102-3). Regardless of the plat 
name, the Grant railroad station was called New 
Philadelphia, and so also was the post office, 
originally located at New Philadelphia and 
moved to Grant. The original plat of New 
Philadelphia was subsequently vacated, and 
Grant, now called New Philadelphia, remained. 

The name is attributed to Lloyd Thomas, 
who was a native of Pennsylvania and who had 
lived in Philadelphia. The other name, "Grant," 
is probably after General Ulysses Grant who 
became U.S. President m 1869, the year the 
town of Grant was platted. 

NEW PHILADELPHIA POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on 
March 16, I860, with Lloyd Thomas as 
postmaster. The post ofTice closed on Jan. 10, 
1957 when its functions were taken over by 
Marietta in Fulton County. 

See also New Philadelphia. 



81 



NEW PHILADELPHIA SCHOOL 
(No. 10, Mound Twp.; No. 76) 

This school is first shown on the iS61 
map on the south side of the SW quarter of Sec. 
24, but no deeds could be located for this site. 
In 1871 the school is located on the SW comer 
of the NW quarter of Sec. 24. on land deeded in 
1865 by Har\'ey Yocum (Deeds: 17/259). It 
remained here 1919. Later maps show the 
school in the town of New Philadelphia. The 
grounds were sold ofTin 1961 (Deeds: 237/61 ). 

NEW PHILADELPHIA U. M. CHURCH or 
NEW PHILADELPHIA (EVANGELICAL) 
UNITED BRETHREN CHURCH 

See Mound United Brethren Church. 

NEW SALEM CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

This congregation organized in 1859 
and worshiped ni the Wetzel school house until 
1867. The sanctuary was erected on the NW 
corner of Sec. 34 in New Salem Twp.. on land 
deeded in 1869 by William Swearingen (Deeds: 
34/81). The congregation moved to Adair in 
1971 and now occupies the former United 
Brethren Church building. This is still an active 
congregation. 

The name Wetzel Church was used as 
late as 1905 (MDJ. 6/1905). 



known when he acquired the mill from Wilson, 
or when the mill stopped operation. Last deeds 
mvolving Newell family were in the 1890s. 

NINE MILE CORNER 

This is the intersection of the present 
U.S. Hvvy. 136 and the III. Hwy. 41. nine miles 
east of Macomb. 

NORTH CEMETERY 

See Glade City Cemetery. 

NORTH COLMAR SCHOOL 

(No.l, Lamoine Twp.; No. 200) 

"Colmar" School was built in 1857 on 
the NE comer of the NW quarter of Sec. 8 in 
Lamoine Twp. (Clarke, 431), where it appears 
on the 1861 map. The 1885 history however 
dates the school to 1861 (1885 History, 661). 
The building is shown in this location until 
1922. In 1940 the school appears across the 
quarter section line on the NW comer of the NE 
quarter of Sec. 8, where it remained until its 
consolidation. No land deeds could be located 
to verify dates and locations. 

The USGS map of 1919 calls the school 
"Union," indicating that it was attended by 
children from both McDonough and Hancock 
counties. 



NEW SALEM TOWNSHIP 

This is Congressional Township Town 
5North, Range IWest from the 4"' Pruicipal 
Meridian. The name of the township derives 
from New Salem, Massachusetts. 

"Salem" is a short form of Jerusalem, 
but it also could have been a deri\ati\e of 
"shalom," Jewish kn peace. The name was 
often used to denote the religious nature of the 
inhabitants. It is a name much used in the U.S. 

NEWELL S MILL 

This mill, ser\ing the needs of the 
Spring Creek neighborhood, was located in 1861 
on the NW quarter of Sec. 16 in Emmet Twp. 
The mill was originally known as Wilson's Mill. 

II is shown on liie I Sd I map as "Saw Mill" on 
John S. Wilsons laiui and in the 1871 atlas on 
Newell's land. l)a\id Newell, who arii\ed m 
McDonough ( iuinl\ in 1853. is lisletl as a nullei 

III the 1X71 atlas He died in 1X7'). It is not 



NORTH FORK LA MOINE RIVER 

This stream originates in Swan Twp. of 
Warren County. It enters McDonough County 
in the NW quarter of Sec. 3 of Walnut Grove 
Twp. It tlows through sections 3 and 2, and 
empties into the East Fork La Moine River in 
Sec. 11. 

See alsi) La Moine Ri\er. 

NORTH PRAIRIE 

rhis was an early local name for the 
e.\tensi\e prairie northeast of Colchester in Hire 
Twp 

NORTH S( HOOL 

(No..^. Lamoine Iwp.; No. 125) 

file 1X6! mail siuu\s tins school on the 
south half o\' the section line between sections 
29 and M) m 1 amoiiie 1 w|i.. the site also gi\en 
b> the 1XX5 historw The seliool was locatetl on 
the Macoinb-( )imK\ Road and il is s.iid thai llie 



82 



site was used for school purposes from 1S41 on. 
No deeds could be found. Sometime between 
1S85 and 1893 the school was moved to the SF 
quarter of Sec. 30, where it remained until 
consolidation into the Plymouth School District. 
The name probably reflects the school's 
position in relation to the town of Plymouth. The 
Methodist Episcopal Church of Plymouth used 
the building for Sunday school in the lS5{)s and 
early 1860s. 

NORTH VISHNU SPRINGS 

See Vishnu. 

NORTHERN CROSS RAILROAD 

This was the name for an early east-west 
rail line to be built through Illinois. After much 
delay and readjustment of its proposed route, the 
line was constructed in the 1850's and was 
renamed Chicago, Burlington & Quincy. 

See also C. B. &Q. R.R. 

NUMBER 5 SCHOOL 

(No. 5, Bushnell T>vp.; No. 5) 

Located on the NE comer of Sec. 2 1 in 
Bushnell Twp., known as the Folsom's Comer 
(Deeds; 22/41 1), this school was first shown on 
the 1861 map. An 1858 deed from Jesse 
Murphy to the school district is probably the 
beginning date (Deeds: 13/292). In 1867 it 
became a union school for the Bushnell and 
Prairie City townships. It succeeded an earlier 
school of "District No. 8," evidence of which 
has survived in the 1858 deed from Jesse 
Murphy to trustees (Bond: 13/292). School No. 
5 retained its name until it consolidated into 
District No. 4 in 1947 and the grounds were sold 
otTin 1950 (Deeds: 206/225). 

This generic name first appears in 
Clarke's history probably to distinguish the new 
school district from the old one. Over the years 
this was the only name for the school. 

See also Folsom's Corner. 



83 



o,p 



OAK GROVE SCHOOL 
(No. 6, Emmet Twp.; No. 53) 

This school was located on the north 
side of the S W quarter of Sec. 17. An 1 866 land 
deed by John Ledgerwood, one of the directors, 
confirms the date and the location which 
remained the same throughout the school's 
existence (Deeds: 26/63). Earlier schools, 
however, e.xisted in the neighborhood. In 1853 
Walker School served District No. 6, and in 
1857 Pleasant View, or District No. 3, was the 
neighborhood school (Genealogy 9:4/588). In 
1863 a school was taught on the SE quarter of 
Sec 7, on what was probably George Guy's land, 
but no land deed could be located. 

Oak Grove School was also known as 
Maple Grove, and on the 1919 USGS map as 
Guy, but Clarke called it Oak Grove (Clarke, 
429), and that was also the school's name in the 
1940s. The grounds were sold off in 1952 
(Deeds: 206/506). 

The name indicates the presence of 
trees, but because oak also suggests permanence, 
beauty, and strength, it is often used in a 
commendatory way. 

See also Walker School. 

OAK GROVE SCHOOL 

(No. 7, Scotland Twp.; No. 96) 

This school, also known as Jones 
School, was U)cated on the SE corner of Sec. 26. 
The 1X71 map shows the building on land 
owned by Samuel R. Jones, who was one of the 
school's early directors. No deeds could be 
located. The school closed in March of 1947 
when It consolidated into the Scollaiul School 
District // 94. 

OAK RIDGE CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the NW 
corner of the SW quarter ol Sec. 35 in 
Tennessee I up. It started in the lS30s as a 
family plot (Cenielenes: 4/16), and is not shown 
on the 1S7I map. The owner of the surrounding 
land v\as VV.A. Ilutchinsi)n ami the cemetery is 



sometimes called by his name. In 1875 Edward 
Jarvis and Leo F. Carson donated land to 
trustees of the "Oakridge Burying Ground" 
(Deeds: 39/83). The cemetery is shown on all 
later maps of the county. It is still in use. 

This cemetery is on a ridge, overlooking 
Troublesome Creek, which explains its name. 

OAKWOOD CEMETERY 

This is the second cemetery of the City 
of Macomb located on the SW quarter of Sec. 30 
in Macomb Twp. The cemetery was established 
by William H. Randolph in 1857. (Plats: 1/23). 
His widow, Mary J. Randolph, sold it to the City 
of Macomb in 1877. Randolph was a noted 
Macomb businessman and supporter of 
Abraham Lincoln. The cemetery contains graves 
of prominent Macomb residents as well as Civil 
War soldiers and veterans. Over the years it has 
been much enlarged and is still in use 

The original cemetery which used to be 
the home of Mary Randolph, nee Brooking, is 
graced by an impressive grove of oak trees. 

OAKWOOD SCHOOL 

(No. 6, Chalmers Twp.; No.106) 

The initial location of this school was on 
the NE comer of the NW quarter of Sec. 14, on 
land donated in 1858 by J.O.C. Wilson (Deeds: 
6/225), where it appears on the 1871 and the 
1876 maps. In 1889 the school was relocated to 
the east side of the SE quarter of Sec. 14, onto 
land purchased from Mary F. Cobb (Deeds: 
64/483). The school remained in this location 
until its consolidation into the Macomb area 
district. The 1893 map shows both the new and 
the old locatit>n. The grounds were sold by 
trustees in 1449 (Deeds: 206 15). 

OLD BARDOLPH CEMETERY 

Ihis cemetery was located on the NE 
quarter ol Sec. 13 in Macomb fwp. .According 
to local sources, the cemetery is "not ulcntifiable 
as a graveyard, but known to be one" (Grimm, 
1987 rev.). No land deeds could he fouiuL 

OLD BEDEORD ( EME rER\ 

See Hedloiil Ccmclcrv. 



84 



OLD BEDFORD (CHRISTIAN) CHURCH 

See Bedford Christian C'Inirch. 

OLD BRICK CHURCH 

See Bedford Christian Church. 

OLD CATHOLIC CEMETERY 

See Old St. Paul's Cemetery. 

OLD CHAPEL METHODIST CEMETERY 

See Wesley Chapel Cemetery. 

OLD COLCHESTER CEMETERY 

See Moore Cemetery (Colchester Twp.). 

OLD COUNTY HOME CEMETERY 

See County Farm Cemetery. 

OLD FORT 

This was the only blockhouse, or log 
fort, built in the county. It was located on Sec. 
26 in Industry Twp. and erected in 1827, one 
year after Carter's Settlement. The fort was part 
of the Cross Roads settlement (McLean, 658). 
The blockhouse was probably built because the 
vicinity showed signs of recent Indian 
occupancy. The newly arrived settlers from 
Kentucky had a history of intense clashes with 
Indians. The blockhouse probably made them 
feel safer in the new location. The building was 
nevertheless ridiculed by soldiers during the 
1832 Black Hawk War because it was located 
fully 200 miles south of the Indian Territory 
( Industry Press , 8/3/1 960, p. I ). 

OLD GALENA ROAD 

See Galena Road. 

OLD HAYES SCHOOL 

See Pleasant View School (Hire Twp.). 

OLD HEAD CEMETERY 

See Head Graveyard. 

OLD HICKORY GRAVEYARD 

See Hickory Grove Cemetery. 

OLD MACOMB CEMETERY 

Also called "Old McDonough 
Cemetery" and more recently known as the 
"Wigwam Hollow Cemetery," this cemetery is 



located near the SF. corner of the NE quarter of 
Sec. 35 in Fmmet Twp. It was formally 
established in 1836 when Robert Garrett sold 
two acres to McDonough County Commission- 
ers "for the use of the people of McDonough 
County as a public burial ground" (Deeds: 
C/68). The site was a burial ground already in 
1830, when a child of Peter Hale was interred 
there, on what, at that time was Hall's or Hale's 
property. This is the final resting place for 
veterans of the Black Hawk War, Mexican War, 
and Civil War. Some headstones are the work 
of the pioneer stone carver, John Long, and are 
the oldest historic artifacts in the county 
(Hallwas, 1984, p.23-26). The burials in the 
cemetery became less frequent after Macomb's 
Oakwood Cemetery was established in 1857. In 
1981 remains of graves from the Gin Ridge 
Cemetery in Bethel Twp. were transferred to this 
cemetery (Old Cemetery, 2). 

OLD MINE ROAD 

See Galena Road. 

OLD PENNINGTON CEMETERY 

See Walker Cemetery. 

OLD PLYMOUTH CEMETERY 

This cemetery, also known as 
Whittington- and Smith Cemetery, is located on 
the SW quarter of the SW quarter of Sec. 30 in 
Lamoine Twp. The cemetery is on private land 
and is not shown on any map of the county. 
According to the 1 885 history, it was located on 
the farm of Dr. King (1885 History, 662). 
Graves date from 1841 to 1865. Most burials 
were children from families residing in Lamoine 
Twp. The 1840 U.S. Census lists Beverly 
Whittington living in Lamoine Twp. 

The name probably means that the land 
was also used as an early burial ground for the 
town of Plymouth, although that could not be 
verified. 

OLD ROMAN CATHOLIC CEMETERY 

See Catholic Cemetery (Tennessee 
Twp.) 

OLD SCHOOL BAPTIST CHURCH 

See LInion Church (Bethel Twp). 



85 



OLD SOUTH CEMETERY 

See New Hope Cemetery. 

OLD ST. PAUL'S CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the NW 
comer of Sec. 2 in Chalmers Twp., on land 
which in 1860 Patrick McGinnis donated to the 
recently organized St. Paul's Catholic Church in 
Macomb (Deeds: 8/40). Because the cemetery 
was quite distant from the town and access to it 
was difficult, a new cemetery was established in 
1 869 north of Macomb across the road from the 
town's Oak Wood Cemetery. At the time all but 
twenty graves were relocated to the new 
cemetery. This cemetery is sometimes called 
"Old Catholic" and "McGinnis." 

See also Catholic Cemetery (Tennessee 
Twp.) and St. Paul's Catholic Cemetery. 

OLD WALKER CEMETERY 

See Walker Cemetery. 

OPEN BIBLE CHURCH 

See Argyle [3ible Church. 

OSBORN CEMETERY 

This cemetery, which was also known as 
Claybaugh, is located on the SH corner of the 
NW quarter of Sec. 22 in Industry Twp. This is a 
private burial plot on land which over the years 
belonged to members of the Osbom family and 
to John Claybaugh. Burials date from 1850s to 
1870s. Most graves are members of the Osbom 
family. The cemetery is not shown on any 
county map. 

OWEN'S or OWENS CEMETERY 

Industry Press places this cemetery in 
Lamoine Twp. (5/23, 1967, p. 3). It seems that 
this was a mistaken name for the King -Tablor 
Cemetery probably because James F. Owen was 
the last burial there in 1954. IUn\ever, 
according to l.ibby (irimm, a local cemetery 
researcher, Owen is an alternate name for 
llillsgrove Cemetery ui feruiessee Twp. where 
Rev. William ()\\cn, a noted religious leader and 
many members olius lamily are buried. 

See also IliiisgroNe Cemetery. 



PACE CORNER 

This is the intersection of the present 
county roads TOON and lOOOE on the NW comer 
of Sec. 35 in Chalmers Twp. The name dates 
back to the 1910s and the Cannon Ball Trail. 
The intersection is still called by this name. 

PAINTER SCHOOL 

See Union School (No. I, Emmet Twp.; 
No. 51). 

PAYNE CEMETERY 

See White Flock Cemetery. 

PEAK CEMETERY 

Located on the SE comer of the west 
half of the NW quarter of Sec. 23 in Industry 
Twp., this is a family cemetery which contains 
only a few graves, one of which is an unmarked 
burial site of Hugh Smith, a veteran of the War 
of 1812. Graves date from 1863 to 1873, during 
which time the surrounding land was owned by 
the Peak family. In 1861 William Peak deeded 
land to the people of McDonough County "for 
the use of a public burying ground" (Mortgages: 
0/417). The cemetery is shown on the 1893 and 
the 1913 maps. It is only 100 yards west from 
the Wilhelm Cemetery. 

PEARCE or PIERCE CEMETERY 

Pearce Cemetery is located on the SW 
corner of the NW quarter of Sec. 26 in Walnut 
Grove Twp. It is the cemetery of a large number 
of Scottish settlers in the area, including Joseph 
Gilmer and Abner Walker. Burials date back to 
the 1830s. This cemetery is shown on all maps 
of the county. The name deri\es from Jesse 
Pearce v\ ho in 1 865 sur\ e\ ed and platted the 
land and in 1 883 donated it "for use as a buiA ing 
ground" (Deeds: 52 356). Charles Allen 
(iilchrist. a Ci\il War general is buried here. 

fhe cemetery is also known as 
Scottsburg, Arbogast, Spicer, and Solan. 
"Solan" might indicate that (he cemetePv was 
part lit the neighborlu>otl 

PE( K or PEC K'S SPRINGS 

See Mineral springs. 



86 



PENNINGTON CEMETERY No. 1 (Emmet 

Twp) 

See Walker Cemetery. 

PENNINGTON CEMETERY No. 2 (Industry 
Twp.) 

This cemetery is located on the east half 
of the NE quarter of Sec. 17. It is named for 
Thomas J. Pennington who in 1872 donated land 
to McDonough County "as a burying ground for 
the use of Industry Township" (Deeds: 35/247; 
Genealogy 13:3/472). The son of Thomas 
Pennington was the first burial in 186Q. The 
cemetery is also known as Coker Cemetery for 
George W. Coker, who owned land on the 
adjacent quarter section. No Coker family 
members seem to have been buried here. The 
cemetery is not shown on any county map. 

PENNINGTON or PENNINGTON'S POINT 

This was the third oldest settlement in 
the county, centering on Sec. 30 in New Salem 
Twp. Although William Pennington was the 
first settler in the area, having built his cabin in 
1828, he left three years later to start the Spring 
Creek Settlement. It was .lohn Stewart 
Pennington, a nephew of Daniel Boone (Crabb), 
in whose honor the neighborhood was named. 
Stewart owned the NW quarter of Sec. 30 prior 
to 1848 at which time he deeded a plot to school 
trustees. After his land passed into the hands of 
his son-in-law, James E. D. Hammer, additional 
land deeds were issued for church and cemetery 
grounds, thus torming a nucleus for a settlement. 
Although presently only the cemetery remains, 
Pennington Point is still a well-known location 
in the county (Plats: 2/88). 

The word "point" derives from a 38-acre 
tract of timber adjacent to Camp Creek, the only 
sizeable timber in the township (McLean, 654). 
For an explanation of the word "point," see 
Foster Point. 

PENNINGTON POINT CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the SW 
quarter of Sec. 19 and the adjacent NE comer of 
the NW quarter of Sec. 30 in New Salem Twp. 
It started in 1836 as a private burial ground on 
land owned by John Stuart Pennington. In 1 860 
James E. D. Hammer donated the Sec. 30 lot to 
McDonough County "for the purpose of 



neighborhood cemetery" (Mortgages: 0/239). 
In 1881 the ownership of the cemetery passed 
into the hands of the Pennington Point Cemetery 
Company (Deeds: 49/628). In 1882 Hammer 
deeded the Sec. 19 lot (Deeds: 47/247), and in 
1893 another lot in the NW quarter of Sec. 30 
(Deeds: 75/80). This cemetery, which includes 
graves of soldiers of the War of 1812, the Black 
Hawk War, and the Civil War. is still in use. 

PENNINGTON POINT METHODIST 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

This congregation started in 1836, but 
the first sanctuary was built in 1856 on land 
deeded in 1855 by James E. D. Hammer 
(Deeds: W/460). The first church building was 
located on the SW comer of the NW quarter of 
Sec. 30 in New Salem Twp, where the grounds 
are shown in a plat (Deeds: 24/164). In 1876 a 
new building was erected nearby, on land again 
deeded by Hammer (Deeds: 43/337; 339) "for 
church purposes." In 1896 this church was 
moved to the NE quarter of the NW quarter of 
Sec. 30, just south of the cemetery, onto land 
donated by Josiah Hammer (Deeds: 79/216). 
The building burned in 1943 and was replaced in 
1947 with the sanctuary of the former Bethany 
Free Methodist Church, which was moved from 
Sec. 32 of Eldorado Twp. (Peter, 185). Last 
services were held in 1968. The building was 
raised in 1972. 

PENNINGTON POINT POST OFFICE 

Johnson Post Office was established on 
May 16, 1847, with Salem Woods as postmaster. 
It was probably located on the NE quarter of 
Sec. 30 on land owned by Woods. On July 26, 
1860 the name changed to Pennington Point, on 
August 5, 1861 again to Johnson, and on July 26 
1865 to Pennington Point, the name it retained 
until its closure in 1902. 

The name Jt)hnson is for Silas Johnson 
who served as postmaster from 1861 to 1865 
and who resided on the east side of the NW 
quarter of Sec. 30 in New Salem Twp. (Deeds: 
13/114:27/277). 



87 



PENNINGTON POINT SCHOOL 

(No. 9, New Salem Twp.; No. 89) 

This school changed location several 
times. The first school in the neighborhood 
started in 1837 on the NE comer of Sec. 30 
(1885 History, 924). In 1848 Stewart 
Pennington deeded land near the SW comer of 
the NW quarter of Sec. 30 (Deeds: L/618). The 
restructuring of school districts in 1857 resulted 
in a new building erected in 1859 on the SW 
comer of Sec. 29 where it is shown on the 1861 
map. The NW quarter of the SW quarter of Sec. 
30 is the location of the school in 1860 (School 
plats). Later maps show a school building on 
the SE comer of Sec. 30 on land deeded by 
J.E.D. Hammer (Mortgages: M/242). The school 
remained in the latter location until 1947 when it 
consolidated with the Adair School. The 
building and grounds were sold in 1948 (Adair 
W. B., 4/1/1948; Deeds: 190/545). 

PEONYDALE 

This was the name of a widely known 
farm on the SE quarter of Sec. 20 in Emmet 
Twp. The farm belonged to the horticulturist 
Charles N. Wettengel. This unique county 
attraction of the 1900s was widely known for 
hybridization of peonies and iris. 

PHELPS MILL 

According to Qi'incy Mainline, a noted 
local historian, Phelps Mill was located on the 
East Fork La Moine River. The mill was the 
successor to the Bacon Mill. It started as Jacoby 
Mill, although no Jacoby ownership could be 
established. The SE quarter of Sec. 6 in 
Colchester Twp., where a "grist and saw mill" is 
shown on the 1861 map, was owned by several 
individuals known to have been millers. The SE 
quarter of the NE quarter belonged to Charles 
Bacon, Jacob J. Reeder, and Robert. R. Bean, 
the latter listed in 1850 as miller operating a 
watcr-powercd savv mill c)n Crooked Creek 
(Products of Industry), l.eander Phelps bought 
out Reeder in 1 859. According to a December 
1860 article in the Macomb Eaule this grist and 
sawmill located six miles west from Macomb 
buriicil. It was apparently not rebuilt flie null 
is again mentioned April 4, 1925 (MDJ, p. 4). 



PILOT GROVE 

This is the highest elevation in New 
Salem Twp. and part of a glacial moraine. It is 
located on the NE comer of Sec. 1 1 and is about 
700 feet above sea level. Adjacent to it is the 
headwater of a stream that empties into the 
Barker Creek in Fulton County. The mound and 
the tree growth at head of the creek created a 
conspicuous landmark in the prairie, and ser\ed 
as a point of orientation during the early years of 
white settlement. 

PILOT GROVE SCHOOL 
(No. 1, New Salem Twp.; No. 89) 

This school was built in 1858 on the NE 
comer of Sec. 1 1, on land purchased from Henry 
Striker in 1850 (Deeds: 0/215). The school 
remained in the location until 1947, when it was 
consolidated into the Adair district. 

PILOT GROVE UNITED BRETHREN 
CHURCH 

This church was built in 1868 (1885 
History, 489) on the NW comer of the NE 
quarter of Sec. 1 1 in New Salem Twp., on land 
deeded by Isaac Rine in 1883 (Deeds: 53/530). 
The church lasted until 1923 when the 
congregation united with the Adair United 
Brethren Church and worshiped in the new 
sanctuary in Adair. The church grounds 
reverted to Rine in 1934 (Deeds: 163/347). The 
building is shown on county maps from 1871 to 
1919. 

PILOT KNOB SCHOOL 
(No. 5, Emmet Twp.; No. 50) 

The earliest school in this neighborhood, 
probably the predecessor oi' the Pilot Knob 
School, was located on the SE quarter of Sec. 3 
where it is shown on the 1861 map, but no deed 
for this property could be located. According to 
Clarke (p. 429) a new building, one of two in the 
Union District No. 5, was erected in 1856 on the 
SW quarter of Sec. 1. An 1864 land deed from 
Orin Chattcrton to the school trustees confirms 
the site (lOcciis: 14 336) llie school remained 
111 tins location and is slu'wii on all coiint\ mai^s 
starting in 1871. 1 he building aiui grounds were 
sold 111 1948 due to coiisolidatu>ii (.\dair W. B., 
4 1/1948; Deeds: 230 297). 

Sec also I'ranic Hill School. 



88 



PIN HOOK 

See Industry. 

PIONEER CEMETERY 

This cemetery was located on private 
land on the SW quarter of the NW quarter of 
Sec. 22 in Bethel Twp. in what was known as 
the Eagle District. Although the cemetery is not 
shown on maps until 1893, the oldest burials 
were members of the Solomon Brundage family 
in the early 1830s. The cemetery was known by 
the name of Brundage and also by names of the 
subsequent owners of the land, T.C. Montee, 
Iverson .lones, and Kost or Cost. The most 
recent name, "Pioneer" came from the 
inscription on the bronze plaque at the east 
entrance: "Erected in honor of the pioneers who 
cleared away the forests and destroyed the 
abiding places of the wild beasts so that 
civilization might occupy the land" (Cemeteries: 
2/19). The cemetery was vacated by the 
Freeman Coal Mine when coal was strip-mined 
in Bethel Twp. The buried remains not claimed 
by relatives were interred m the Old Macomb 
Cemetery. 

PITTENGER or PITTINGER SCHOOL 
(No. 3, Prairie City Twp.; No. 3) 

This school was located on the SE 
comer of Sec. 6, on land donated in 1858 by 
John W. King (Deeds: 10/620). The school is 
shown in this location on all maps starting in 
1861. Joseph A. Keith and Pittenger family later 
owned the surrounding land and lent their names 
to the school. It ceased to operate in 1947, when 
it consolidated into the Prairie City School 
District. The grounds were sold in the same 
year (Deeds: 190/517). 

PLEASANT GALE SCHOOL 
(No. 2, Sciota Twp.; No. 21) 

This school was located on the SE 
comer of Sec. 4. It was built m 1868 (Clarke. 
430), on land deeded only in 1885 (Deeds: 
59/184). Apparently the school was first known 
as Aten. It was mentioned by this name in the 
Macomb Joumal (3/20/1884, p. I). The name 
was after William Aten who is shown to have 
owned the NW quarter of Sec. 10 in 1871 and 
later. It is not known when the name changed to 
Pleasant Gale. The school remained in the 



location until April of 1947, when it consoli- 
dated mlo the Blandinsville-Sciota District No. 
1 75. No end deed could be located. 

The word "pleasant" is used very often 
for place names. It is quasi-descriptive and 
commendatory in nature. With generics it 
makes up names t\)r natural features with hiuiian 
habitation in mind (Placenames). "Ciale" is 
poetic for breeze, so the name invokes an open 
and breezy location. 

PLEASANT GALE UNITED BRETHREN 
CHURCH 

This congregation organized in 1868 
and built a church in 1874 on land donated by 
Charles Chandler (Deeds: 41/4). The church 
was located on the NE comer of Sec. 8 in Sciota 
Twp. The 1 893 county atlas shows the building 
on the SE comer of Sec. 5, but this is probably a 
mistake since no deed could be found to confirm 
that location. The church is last shown on the 
1945 map. It does not e.xist any more, but no 
deed ccudd be foiuid to verify the closing date. 

The church probably derived its name 
from the school where it might have met prior to 
the building of the sanctuary. The congregation 
was also known as United Brethren in Christ 
Church of Sciota Township. 

PLEASANT GROVE CEMETERY 

See Springer Grave. 

PLEASANT GROVE FREE METHODIST 
CHURCH 

This church was located on the NE 
comer of the NW quarter of Sec. 34 in 
Tennessee Twp. It apparently started in 1892 
when William Lawyer deeded land to "Grove 
Church" (Deeds: 74/4). It seemed to have 
functioned only until 1919 when the land 
reverted back to Lawyer (Deeds: 125/107). The 
church was part of what used to be known as 
"Lawyer Neighborhood." 

See also Lawyer School. 

PLEASANT GROVE METHODIST 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

See Crossroads Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 



89 



PLEASANT GROVE SCHOOL 
(No. 4, Industry Twp.; No. 146) 

See Cross Roads School. 

PLEASANT GROVE SCHOOL (Macomb 
Twp.) 

See Pleasant Hill School. 

PLEASANT HILL SCHOOL 

(No. 6, Macomb Twp.; No. 65) 

This school was originally District No. 3 
with the schoolhouse located on the west side of 
the SW quarter of Sec. 23 where it is shown in 
1856 (RSR, 177) and also in 1861. The school 
was built in 1855 on land donated in 1856 by 
George J. Booth, one of the school directors 
(Deeds: Z/784). It remained in this location 
until March of 1947 when it consolidated with 
the Bardoiph School District. The grounds were 
sold in the same year (Deeds: 190/496; 
McDonough C.T.. 7/31/1947). 

The 1919 USGS map incorrectly labels 
the school "Pleasant Grove." The school was 
also known as Switzer School, because it was 
surrounded by Switzer family land. 

PLEASANT MOUND 

This land feature is located on the NW 
quarter of Sec. 6, ni Prairie City Twp. and the 
adjacent NE comer of Sec. 1 m Walnut Grove 
Twp. At 725 feet above sea level, the mound is 
the highest elevation in tiie northeastern part of 
the county. This was the site of Pleasant Mound 
Methodist F.piscopal Ciiurch. 

PLEASANT MOUND METHODIST 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

This church, also called Mound 
Methodist Episcopal Church, was built in 1858 
(Clarke, 548) on the NW corner of Sec. 6 in 
Prairie City Twp., on lantl tlonalcd by .John King 
( Deeds: 4 464). In 1902 the land reverted h) the 
King fanuly and .lames M. King issued a bond to 
the Melhotlist l:piscopal Church Walnut Grove 
(Miscclaneous: 3/223). In 1908 the church 
building was moved to Walnut (irove and 
renamed Walnut Grove Church. The grounds 
were sold in the same year (Deeils: 105/40). 



PLEASANT RIDGE SCHOOL 

A school by this name is mentioned in 
the records of the Wesley Methodist Church 
(Wesley: C/90). The name probably refers to 
what became known as Center Point School in 
Scotland Twp., but this could not be confirmed. 

PLEASANT VALLEY MILL or MILLS 

Next to the Lamoine Mill, this was the 
most important and long4asting mill in the 
county. It started in 1837 when Jacob Emrick 
applied for permission to build a mill and dam in 
the SW quarter of the NW quarter of Sec. 12 of 
then Tennessee, and now Colchester Twp. 
(Commissioners: A.358). He had owned part of 
the west half of Sec. 12 as early as 1827 
(Mortgages: A/435). The mill site changed 
owners with great frequency. L. Allen Key 
bought the land in 1839 (Deeds: F/47), Reuben 
Harrington in 1840 (Deeds: F/343). Cornelius 
Carmack in 1854 (Deeds: V/520). and John J. 
Foster in 1856 (Deeds: Z/156). The mill is 
mentioned as Foster's Mill in 1862 (MJ, 5/17- 
24, 1862) and also as Carmack's Mill. 

The 1840 deed from Alien Key to 
Reuben Harrington and John S. Procter confirms 
the site. The sale of the west half of the NW 
quarter of Sec. 12 for $13,400 indicates a 
sizeable infrastructure. The description of the 
property states: "together with the Hour null 
known by the name of Key's Mill." At the time 
the property had a mortgage on it by Jacob 
Emerick (Deeds: F/343). In 1842 County 
Commissioners mention Harrington Mill as 
located on tiie road from Macomb to Carthage 
(Commissioners, B/192, 207), but in December 
of 1843 they call for a bridge to be replaced at 
"PI. Valley Mills" (Commissioners, B 263). 
The new name was probably occasioned bv the 
lieu post office in the \icinity. An unnamed 
null is shown in this location on the 1861 map, 
and the "P.P. Valley Mill" on the 1871 atlas 
map. 

Locally, the beginning oi' the Pleasant 
Valley Mill, ca. 1850, is attributed to Cornelius 
Carmack. Carmack might ha\e rebuilt the mill 
and proniolcd it hea\ily, thus being viewed as 
tlic louiuler. but recori.ls iiulicate a mucii earlier 
mill III this location. Ilie mill cK>seii in I 905. 

.According to the Colchester 
I ndepende nt. Hinlington Northern Raihoa(,l built 



00 



a dam just below the old mill dam in jyiS in 
order to supply water for the C.I3.&Q. steam 
engines (6/16/1927. p. 2). The resulting pool 
became a local swimming and baptizing site. 

PLEASANT VALLEY MILL POST OFFICE 

See Argyle Post OtTice. 

PLEASANT VALLEY SCHOOL 
(No. 1, Mound Twp.; No. 72) 

This school was located on the SE 
corner of Sec. 6. It is shown in this location on 
all maps of the county starting in 1871, but no 
deeds could be located to verity the date of 
origin. On the 1919 USGS map this school is 
called "Possum Hollow." 

PLEASANT VIEW CEMETERY 

See Guy Cemetery. 

PLEASANT VIEW METHODIST 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

See Guy Chapel. 

PLEASANT VIEW SCHOOL (Fmmet Twp.) 
See Oak Grove School (Fmmet Twp.). 

PLEASANT VIEW SCHOOL 
(No. 2, Hire Twp.; No. 41) 

This school started in 1837 on the NE 
quarter of Sec. 4. It was known as "Hayes 
School" because it was located near the "Old 
Hays Cemetery" and is shown on the 1861 map. 
In 1867 a new schoolhouse was built on the S\V 
comer of Sec. 3. The school is shown in this 
location on all maps of the county from 1871 on. 
It ceased operation in 1946 when it consolidated 
into the Blandmsville-Sciota District # 175. The 
school was also known by the name of Buena 
Vista and Foster, the latter because Floyd Foster 
was one of the directors (Clarke, 432) and it was 
located on Foster land in the 20" century. No 
deeds could be located. 

"Buena Vista" is Spanish for "pleasant 
view." 

PLEASANT VIEW SCHOOL (Mound Twp ) 
See Hanson School. 



POPE CEMETERY 

This is a family graveyard located on the 
NW quarter of the SW quarter of Sec. 6 in 
Tennessee Twp. The cemetery contained early 
graves of Elijah Pope and James Dye families, 
although the Dye graves were subsequently 
relocated. The cemetery is also called Dye 
Cemetery. It is not shown on any county map. 

POSSUM HOLLOW SCHOOL 

See Pleasant Valley School. 

POSSUM RIDCE 

Quincy llainline, Macomb newspaper 
publisher and early local historian, mentioned 
this name in the Macomb Journal for Jan. 1 7, 
1922, but he indicated no location. The name 
might refer to the high ground between the 
Drowning Fork and the East Fork La Moine 
River, in sections 6 and 7 of Mound Twp. The 
1919 USGS map shows Pleasant Valley or 
Possum Hollow School near the ridge. 

POST-SHIPPEY CEMETERY 

This is a family burial plot which is 
located on the SW quarter of Sec. 32 in Emmet 
Twp. In the 1830s and 1840s the land belonged 
to David Shippey and John J. Post. Only three 
graves have been positively identified. 

POWERS SCHOOL HOUSE 

See Foster Point School. 

PRAIRIE CITY 

Laid out in 1854 by Ezra Cadwallader, 
Anson Smith, Ezra D. Smith and Edwin Reed 
(Deeds, V/583-4) on the projected line of the 
C.B. & Q. R.R., this town is located on the NW 
quarter of Sec. 1 in Prairie City Twp. The name 
is attributed to Alonzo Barnes, an early 
merchant, who thus called the place he wanted 
his goods from St. Louis to be shipped to ( 1885 
History, 765). 

PRAIRIE CITY CEMETERY 

Prairie City's early cemetery was on the 
SE quarter of Sec. 36 in Greenbush Twp. in 
Warren County. In 1874, the present city 
cemetery was laid out on the NE quarter of Sec. 
2 in Prairie City Twp., on land purchased in 
1866 from Franklin G. Snapp (Deeds: 25/437). 



91 



PRAIRIE CITY POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on May 
19, 1855 with Alonzo Barnes as the first 
postmaster. 

PRAIRIE CITY TOWNSHIP 

In June 1866, upon a petition from 
voters of the Prairie City Township, the 
Congressional Township Town VNorth and 
Range IWest from the 4"' Principal Meridian 
was divided by the McDonough County Board 
of Supervisors into two equal parts (Minutes: 
E/116). The north half became Prairie City 
Township and the south half became Bushnell 
Township. Both were named for the already 
existing towns within their borders. 

PRAIRIE HILL SCHOOL 
(No. 5, Macomb Twp.; No. 63) 

This was one of two school buildings in 
the Union District No. 5 of Macomb and Emmet 
townships, which had buildings in both 
townships. Prior to the schoolhouses built in 
1 856, a log cabin, located near the residence of 
Patrick Laughlin on the east side of the NE 
quarter of Sec. 13 in Emmet Twp., served as 
school (Clarke, 425). This location is confirmed 
by an 1 842 deed from Nelson Montgomery 
(Deeds: H/304). The school house in Macomb 
Twp. was located on the west side of the NW 
quarter of Sec. 18 on land deeded by Benjamin 
Randolph in 1859 (Deeds: 9/196) and shown on 
the 1861 map. In the 1920s this school was 
moved north across the section line, to the SW 
quarter of Sec. 7, onto land owned by Fred D. 
McKee. but no deeds could be located. Before 
the move the school was called "Prairie School," 
after the move it was "Prairie iliil" because it 
was located t)n a slight elevation, it was also 
known as McKee School (1976 History, 34). 
Prior to the closing it appears the school was 
moved one more time back to Sec. 18, where it 
appears on the school district map for 1939. It 
closed sometime after 1947, and the grounds 
passed into private hands in 1952 (Deeds: 
206/481). 

See also Pilot Knob Scluxil. 

PRAIRIE SCHOOL 

Sec Praine I 111! School. 



PRAIRIE VIEW SCHOOL 

This school was supposed to have been 
two miles southeast from the Guy Chapel, on the 
NE quarter of Sec. 19 in Emmet Twp. This 
location would have placed it in the general 
vicinity of Hardscrabble or Yard School, but no 
infomiation was found to confirm that the two 
schools were one and the same. 

PRENTISS PLACE 

The "Prentiss Farm" was one of the first 
settled areas in the NW comer of Tennessee and 
the adjoining Hire townships. Land deed 
records show Prentice (sic) family members 
purchasing the NE quarter of Sec. 6 in 1836 in 
the "Friendship Neighborhood." The 1885 
history (p. 631) implies a well-known place 
name, as evidenced by many names starting with 
"Friendship." 

PRENTISS SCHOOL 

See Martin School (Tennessee Twp.). 

PRICE SCHOOL 

(No. 8, Eldorado Twp.; No. 157) 

This school was located on the west side 
of the SW quarter of Sec. 27, on land donated by 
John Price in 1861 (Deeds: 51,221). In 1902 
George Price sold additional land (Deeds: 
96/198). The school existed until 1945, when the 
building burned and children transferred to the 
Eldorado District ti 154. The grounds passed 
into private hands in 1947 (Deeds: 206/1). 

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH 

See Union Church (Bethel Twp.). 

PROSPERITY CHLRCH OF THE llMTED 
BRETHREN 

See Willow Cirove United Brethren 
Church. 

PROSPERITY HALL 

riiis was the community center for the 
Spring Creek Settlement. It was erected in 1862 
by the (iood Icmplar Society, and was located 
on the SI' corner of Sec. 6 in I'nimet I'wp.. near 
Bruce Post Office (Harris, M.) IIk- Iniildmg 
was used for multiple purpi>ses. 

See also Willow (iio\e I in led nictiiien 
Climch. 



92 



PROVINE MILL 

This mill was huilt in 1836 by John 
Allison and George Provme. it was located on 
Camp Creek on Sec. 1 in Bethel Tvvp. 
(Commissioners: A/298), probably in the NE 
quarter. It existed until 1 864 when a notice of 
its sale appeared in the Macomb Journal 
(1/8/1864, p.l). No later reference to this mill 
has been found. 

PRUITT or PRUETT CEMETERY 

This cemetery is on privately owned 
land on the SW quarter of Sec. 27 in Bethel 
Twp. The name derives from members of the 
Pruitt family buried there. The family lived in 
the vicinity but did not own the land on which 
the cemetery is located. 

PURDUM SAWMILL 

This mill was located on the NFi quarter 
of Sec. 25 in Lamoine Twp. The mill first 
appears on the 1861 map on W.S. Brown land. 
In 1871 the mill is shown again, this time on 
Samuel Purdum property. It is not known when 
this mill started and stopped operation. 



93 



R 



R.R.I. & ST.L. RAILROAD 

See Rockford, Rock Island & St. Louis 
Railroad. 

RABBIT BURROW SCHOOL 
(No. 5, Blandinsville Twp., No. 36) 

This school is shown on the 1861 map 
to be located on the NW quarter of Sec. 35., on 
land donated in 1868 (Deeds: 34/506) by George 
Bughman. Clarke's history places the school in 
Sec. 36 (Clarke, 433), which was probably a 
mistake since no land deed could be found to 
verify this location. The school remained on 
Sec. 35 until 1929 when it is last shown. A 
1955 deed transferred the grounds into private 
ownership (Deeds: 215/308). 

Tills name is seldom used for 
habitations, because the animal was of little note 
and the term is semi-derogatory in nature. 
However, schools were often called by names 
meaningful to children, and this could have been 
such a case. 

RABBIT CEMETERY 

This cemetery was located on the NE 
quarter of Sec. 2 in Chalmers Twp. It must have 
been a private burial ground because no deed for 
a cemetery could be located and it does not show 
on any map. Even the memory of it has not 
survived. According to Louis Gumbart, an early 
county historian, stones were used for a tloor of 
a hog house sometimes before 1900. 

(iunibart called the unnamed cemetery 
"Rabbit" because he and local boys hunted 
rabbits among the grave markers. 

RABONI 

See llillsgrove Station. 

RAGTOWN 

Ragtown was a well-known name 
applied to a neighbitrhood north of Colchester, 
cenlermg on the southwest part of Sec. 1 \n 
Colchesler lup. The name was k)cally popular 
ui the second half of the 19"' Century when 



Colchester was a major coal-mining center. 
According to the 1950 Souvenir Program of the 
Colchester Labor Day Picnic, the early name of 
Ragtown was "Stringtown." 

Both Ragtown and Stringtown indicate 
poverty. Some local sources state that the names 
referred to poor condition of children's clothes, 
and some attribute the names to the patched 
wagon covers of immigrant miners. According 
to American Placenames, "Ragtown" was a 
common temi for settlements considered to be 
unusually slovenly. 

RAGTOWN SCHOOL 

(Colchester Twp.; No. 110) 

This school started in 1879 with a land 
deed from J.R. Welch for the NE comer of the 
SE quarter of Sec. 2 (Deeds: 48/633) and in 
1950 this same land was sold off by tmstees 
(Deeds: 213/623). The school does not appear 
on county maps until 1913. In later years it is 
shown across the quarter section line on the SE 
comer of the NE quarter of Sec. 2, but no land 
deed could be found to verify this latter location. 
The school consolidated into the Colchester 
District in 1946. 

RAILROAD SCHOOL 

See Sperry School. 

RANDOLPH 

See Bardolph. 

RANDOLPH AND HENDRICKSON MILL 

See Lamoine Mills. 

RANDOLPH CORNERS 

This was a settlement located on Sec 14 
in New Salem Twp. It was named for Thornton 
F. Randolph, the postmaster. 

See also .Adair. 

RANDOLPH HALL 

Ihis name appears onl\ once on the 
1860 sclutol district plat map o\' New Salem 
Twp. (Sclun)l Plats) 'Raiulolph Hall," was 
located on the south h.iH o\' the SI- quarter of 
Section 19 in Ne\s Salem fwp.. within then 
School District No ') 1 here is no present-day 
knowletige of this place or ils iunction 



94 



RAPID FORD 

This was a ford on Troublesome Creek 
in Lamoine Twp., so named by a party of 
soldiers during the War of 1812. One of the 
soldiers, David Bayless, subsequently settled in 
the township (1885 History, 653). It is not 
certain where this ford was located. The 1861 
map of the county shows a road crossing 
Troublesome Creek in the SE comer of Sec. 9. 

RAPIDS ROAD 

Rapids Road was an early state road 
which, together with the Galena Road, crossed 
the Illinois River at Beardstown and at 
Crossroads turned west going through the 
village of Doddsville, Bethel and Lamoine 
townships, the town of Plymouth and Hancock 
County, to Fort Edwards (present-day Warsaw) 
( Bardolph News , 8/31/1910). The road is 
mentioned in the County Commissioners 
Proceedings as early as 1832 (Commissioners: 
A/90). An 1856 sketch shows the road running 
east-west through the middle of sections 32 and 
33 of Lamoine Twp. (RSR, 180). 

The rapids were the De Moines or 
Lower Rapids of the Mississippi River with 
head at Nauvoo and foot at Warsaw. The rapids 
were quite shallow and precluded river 
navigation prior to the construction of canals. 
Mississippi was crossed either above Nauvoo, at 
Burlington, or below Warsaw. 

See also Cow Ford Bridge. 

RATTLESNAKE DEN HOLLOW 

This is a narrow valley of an intermittent 
stream, which empties into the La Moine River 
in Sec. 36 of Hancock Twp. in Hancock County. 
The hollow is located in sections 29. 30 and 31 
of Tennessee Twp., southwest of Hillsgrove. 
County histories relate that early settlers found 
many rattlesnakes and black snakes in this valley 
with sandstone banks. According to histories of 
Hillsgrove, the hollow with its unusual rock 
fomiations such as the Balanced Rock, was 
frequented by Indians for camping (Rinehart, 
24) and as a place of worship (Mavis, 74). 

Rattlesnakes were common in the 
county and can still be found in the wild. The 
valley was by all accounts a charming, beautiful 
place. It was apparently never cultivated, and its 
sides were covered with wild flowers. 



READING'S or REDDINC MILL 

See Langford's lk)use Mill. 

REEDERIVIILL 

See Phelps Mill. 

REEDYVILLE 

See Adair. 

REEDYVILLE SCHOOL 

See Adair and Lickskillet schools. 

REGULAR BAPTIST CHURCH (Bethel 
Twp.) 

See Union Church (Bethel Twp.). 

RICE'S CEMETERY or BURIAL GROUND 

See White Flock Cemetery. 

RICE'S CORNER 

This was the birthplace of children's 
author and illustrator, Peter Newell (Vizdal). In 
1847 Marcus Rice sold 155 acres of the NW 
quarter of Sec. 1 1 in Lamoine Twp. to school 
trustees for repayment of debt (Deeds: J/682). 
The comer which lent its name to the whole 
neighborhood was the SW comer of the NW 
quarter of Sec. 1 1 which was also a school site 
from 1 850- 1 860. George Newell, the father of 
Peter Newell, lived half a mile north of the 
Comer, and taught the school from 1854 to 
1859. Later redistricting resulted in the White 
Flock School located one mile to the east. 

See also White Flock School. 

RICE'S MILL 

This was a well-known mill on the road 
from Macomb to Carthage. The mill started in 
1829 when Oliver Rice left Macomb and went 
west to run a mill (1885 History, 87). In 1837 
J. Camp and Rice's Mill was located on Spring 
Creek at the old ford on the road leading from 
Macomb to Job's Settlement (Commissioners: 
A/332. 337). The mill is mentioned again in 
1847 (RSR, 8). In the 1860 U. S. Census of 
Population B. Camp is listed as miller in 
Chalmers Twp. 

There is no record where the old ford 
was located, hut the SE quarter of Sec. 32 in 
Emmet, and the adjacent NF quarter of Sec. 5 in 
present Colchester Twp. were sold repeatedly to 



95 



persons identified as millers. In 1X36 Oliver 
Rice sold out to George Rice (Deeds: C73I3) 
and in the same year he sold the same land to 
Israel Camp (Deeds: C/325). In 1847 Delia 
Rice sold out to G. P. Gates (Deeds: L/370) and 
Gates in turn sold the same property to J.H. 
Baker in 1864. It is not known when the mill 
ceased operation. 

See also McDonald's Mill. 

RICH BRANCH 

This stream flows south through the 
west half of Sec. 36 in Industry Twp. and joins 
Tolans Branch in Oakland Twp. in Schuyler 
County. 

The origin of the name is not known. 

RICHARDS, RICH or RICHARD SCHOOL 
(No. 7, Mound Twp.; No. 77) 

Clarke's history calls this school district 
"Langsford" and states that the building was 
moved in 1863 from the New Philadelphia 
district onto the SW comer of Sec. 25 (Clarke, 
420). The school appears in this location until 
1939 with the exception of the 1919 USGS map 
which shows a "Rich" school across the section 
line on the SE comer of Sec. 26. In 1940 the 
school is shown '/: mile west on the SW comer 
of the SE quarter of Sec. 26. When the school 
building and grounds were sold by trustees in 
1 95 1 , the location was the SW comer of Sec. 25 
(Adair W. B., 1 1/22/1951; Deeds: 207/496). 

Langsford and Richards are names of 
neighboring families. "Rich," might have been 
after members of a Rich family, several of 
whom are buried in the Mound Methodist Ceme- 
tery. 

RIDON or RIDEN CEMETERY 

See Bowlin-VVayland Graves. 

RH.i; C EMETERY 

Ibis cemetery is located on tlie SW 
quarter of Sec. I in Bethel Twp. It is a private 
burial ground for the Rigg family aiul is located 
on land that originally belonged to .loseph Rigg. 
Rigg Cemetery was part of the (\)llage Corner 
Neighborhood (1976 History, 15). 

See also Cottage Comer Sclu)ol. 



RILEY, RILLEY or RILLEV ILLE 

On July 31, 1914, Ollie Nooner and 
Frank A. Riley platted a "Town of Riley" on the 
NE comer of Sec. 7 and the adjacent comer of 
Sec. 8 in Lamoine Twp. (Plats, 3/63). The town 
was a speculative venture in response to the 
discovery of oil in the Colmar-Plymouth Oil 
Field, but it did not develop and the plat was 
vacated on February 6, 1915, less than a year 
later. 

RINEHART CEMETERY 

This cemetery is mentioned in The 
Industry Press for May 23, 1967 (p. 3) as having 
been located in Bethel Twp. No other 
information could be found. 

RITTER SCHOOL 

See Litchfield School. 

RIVER A LA MINE 

See La Moine River. 

ROBIN GLEN SCHOOL 
(No. 3, Hire Twp.: No. 42) 

According to Clarke, this district was 
organized in 1864. It appears that the earliest 
school location in this neighborhood was on the 
NE quarter of the NE quarter of Sec. 6 on land 
deeded by William Milsap in 1850 (Deeds: 
N/417) . The school is shown in this location on 
the 1871 and the 1876 maps. Clarke's histon.', 
published in 1878, places the school on the NW 
corner of Sec. 8, a location verified by an 1868 
land grant from Solomon Mainline (Deeds: 
26/342). However, the 1893 and all later maps 
shov\ a school on the SW comer of Sec. 5 on 
land deeded in I89| by Hebern C. Kline (Deeds: 
69/50). The school operated until 1947 and the 
lot reverted back to the Kline family in 1949 
(Deeds: 206/413). 

All three buildings were located in 
timber, so the name may ha\e alludeil to birds. 
It also ma\ ha\e been a name appealing to 
children. No connection could be established 
with Robin Glen, the residence of Phihiiuler 
Chase, the famous i'resbyterian Minister and 
Ibuiuler i>l Jubilee Colleue. 



96 



ROBINSON CEMETERY 

Not much is known iib(Hit tliis i'amily 
cemetery located on the SW quarter of Sec. 30 
in Bushneil Twp. on land owned by tlie Mathew 
Robinson family in the 1870s. The cemetery is 
not visible any more (Grimm, 1987 rev.). It was 
also known as Solon-Robinson Cemetery. There 
is no explanation for the name "Solon," unless 
the cemetery was viewed as part of Mt. Solon 
neighborhood. 

See also Mt. Solon School. 



ROCK CREEK METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

This congregation organized in 1850 
and met in the Rock Creek school building on 
the SW corner of Sec. 17 until 1875, when a 
church was built on the SE comer of the SW 
quarter of Sec. 17, in Mire Twp., on land donated 
in 1874 by .lacob Mainline (Deeds: 38/409). The 
church was active until 1971 when trustees sold 
the land (Deeds: 272/510). The building was 
torn down in 1972 (Peter, 80). 



ROCK BRIDGE 

Rock Bridge is mentioned twice, in 
1830 and agam in 1831 (Commissioners: A/ 17, 
19, 37). It was an important marker, but 
references to its locations conflict. According to 
the first remark, the bridge is on the "Old Galena 
Trail," but two pages later it is said not to be 
located on the trail. The 1831 reference states 
that the bridge was located on the Lead Mine 
Road on the south boundary line of the county, 
but there is no stream there to bridge. The only 
substantial stream in the southeast part of the 
county is Sugar Creek, which enters the county 
from the east and exits to the south. It is 
possible that the bridge was over Sugar Creek 
just south of the NE comer of Sec. 25 in 
Eldorado Twp. The road from Petersburg to 
Macomb crossed Sugar Creek in Eldorado Twp. 
in 1851 (RSR, 74), and the 1861 county map 
shows several roads con\ erging on this point. 
The 1871 map shows a north-south road 
crossing Sugar Creek in the SE quarter of the 
SW quarter of Sec. 35 in Eldorado Twp. No 
present-day knowledge of this bridge exists. 

See also Galena Road. 

ROCK CREEK 

This major stream of Hire Twp. flows in 
the southwesterly direction through sections 14, 
15, 16, 21, 20, 19. and 30 to join La llarpe 
Creek in Fountain Green Twp., Hancock 
County. 

The creek is named for the rocky 
riverbed, an unusual rock outcropping in the 
northwestem part of the county. 

ROCK CREEK CEMETERY 

See Central Cemetery. 



ROCK CREEK SCHOOL 
(No. 4, Hire Twp.; No. 43) 

There is evidence that an early school in 
this vicinity was located on the SW quarter of 
Sec. 19 on land deeded in 1843 by Joshua White 
(Mortgages: B/450). It would have preceded the 
school started in 1857 (Clarke, 432) after the 
district reorganized. The 1871 and the 1876 
atlases show the 1857 school on the SW comer 
of Sec. 17 in Hire Twp., although no deeds 
could be found to contlmi this location. All 
later maps show it across the section line tm the 
SE comer of Sec. 18, on land deeded in 1873 by 
William II. Hungate (Deeds: 35/478). The 
school served as a focal point for the Rock 
Creek neighborhood well into the 1930s. It 
closed in 1947 and in 1958 the land passed into 
private hands (Deeds: 215/632). 

ROCK CREEK TOWNSHIP 

See Hire Township. 

ROCKFORD, ROCK ISLAND & ST. LOUIS 
RAILROAD 

This railroad line was built in the late 
1860s. It entered McDonough County in the NE 
quarter of Sec. 2 in Walnut Grove Twp., went 
through Bushneil and Adair, and exited the 
county in Sec. 25 of New Salem Twp. The line 
northwest of Bushneil was vacated in the early 
1980s. The rest of the line became part of the 
C.B. & Q. system, and later the Burlington 
Northern Railroad. 

ROGER'S or RODGER'S CREEK 

See Camp Creek. 



97 



ROGER'S (settlement) 

One of the early settlements in the 
county, Rogers is centered on the NW comer of 
Industry and the SW comer of Scotland 
townships (1885 History, 1043). in the general 
vicinity of Camp Creek. According to Clarke's 
history, John Rogers located in the area in 1830 
and left in the spring of 1831. but not before the 
census taker recorded the family; John, between 
40 and 50 years old, with wife and 5 children, 
and three family members aged 60 to 70. This 
was by all accounts an influential family, 
supported by the fact that Rogers' house was the 
site of the oldest Sabbath School in the County 
(1885 History, 1043), 

John Rogers is known to have bought 
land on the SE quarter of Sec. 32 in Scotland 
Twp. in 1831 (Deeds: Ay'8), which he sold to 
John Vance in 1832. and Vance sold it to John 
M. Walker in 1838. County commissioners in 
1831 instructed road \ iewers to locate a road 
from "Rogers to Rushville" (Commissioners. 
A/40). The road was part of the Galena Trail. 



where it conducted services until 1862. No deed 
could be found to confimi the existence of a 
church building site so the map might have 
indicated a private building serving as a church. 
See also North School. 

RUNKLE CEMETERY 

See Doddsville Cemetery. 

RUNKLE SCHOOL 

(No. 3, Industry Twp.; No. 147) 

Runkle School was always known by 
this name. It was built in 1866 on the NW 
comer of the SE quarter of Sec. 28, on land 
donated by Darius Runkle (Deeds: 20/387). It 
remained in this location until 1949 when it 
consolidated into the Industry District # 165. 
The building was sold in 1950 (Adair W. B., 
12/21/1950) and the grounds m 1951 (Deeds: 
206/263). 

RLSHVILLE-GALENA ROAD 

See Galena Road. 



ROMIN FORK 

See Drowning Fork. 

ROUND PRAIRIE 

This name was given to a prairie, about 
three miles wide, located in the very SW comer 
of the county on Section 30 of Lamoine Twp. 
and extending into Schuyler and Hancock 
counties. Round Prairie was settled in 1831 or 
1832. Located northeast of the present town of 
Plymouth in Hancock County, the settlement 
was on the important Macomb-Quincy road and 
is mentioned m 1S32 (Commissioners: A 88). 
The name is still in use. 



RUSSELL CEMETERY 

See Spring Creek Cemetery. 

RUSSELL CLAY BANK 

See Clay banks and clay pits. 

RUSSELL'S GROVE 

See Spring Creek (Settlement). 



IROUND PRAIRIE CIIURCHI 

This is a nameless church shown only 
on the 1861 map of the county. It is located on 
the SF comer of the SW quarter of Sec. 31 on 
land which at the time was owned by S. Searle. 
The church might have been the predecessor of 
the Plymouth Methodist Episcopal Church. 
According lo the Plymouth historian, I- Ihirton, 
the first class of the PKiiioulh church was 
formctl III 1S33 and niel in pinate luniics on the 
south sulc ol the prairie ('N'oung, p. I')4-I')5). 
I atcr llic cliurch met in the North School House 



OS 



s 



SHILL 

This was the s-shaped, steep incline on 
the present U.S. Hwy. 67 north of the La Moine 
River so called in 1922. It came into existence 
when the road leading north from Macomb was 
straightened, a bridge was built east of the 
original site, and the road surtace paved 
allowing vehicles to negotiate the hill. 

SACRED HEART CEMETERY 

See Catholic Cemetery (Tennessee 
Twp.) 

SACRED HEART CHURCH 

This was the first Catholic churcii in the 
county. It was built in 1857 on the SE comer of 
the SW quarter of Sec. 15 in Tennessee Twp., on 
land deeded by Charles Bowman in 1861 
(Deeds: 8/423). The church, called St. Mary's, 
and the attendant Catholic cemetery formed an 
early nucleus of Catholic families in the county. 
The church was renamed Sacred Heart shortly 
afterwards. When St. Paul's Church in Macomb 
was built in 1867, Sacred Heart became a 
mission of St. Paul's. A new sanctuary was 
built in 1905 just west from the original site. It 
still stands but is not used for regular services 
any more. 

See also Catholic Cemetery. 

SAGWA POST OFFICE 

This post otfice opened on May 6, 1893 
with William Wheeler as the first postmaster. It 
discontinued on Dec. 20, 1898 when it merged 
with the Doddsville Post Otfice. The post office 
was located on the SE quarter of Sec. 23 in 
Bethel Twp (Site). It served a well-known 
Victor neighborhood with the Victor School on 
the SW quarter of Sec. 25(1976 History. 14). 

No explanation for the name could be 
found. Sagwa was sometimes spelled 

"Sagiwah," 

ST. MARY'S CHURCH 

See Sacred Heart Church. 



ST. PAUL'S CEMETERY 

This cemetery was established in 1869 
on land purchased in 1877 by parishioners to 
replace the t)riginal St. Paul's cemetery, called 
Old St. Paul's Cemetery in Chalmers Twp. (St. 
Paul, 79). St. Paul's Cemetery is located on the 
SW quarter of Sec. 30 in Macomb Twp., on the 
north side of Macomb across the road from 
Macomb's Oakwood Cemetery. At the time the 
cemetery was consecrated, most graves in the 
Old Catholic Cemetery in Chalmers Twp. were 
moved to the new location. The cemetery is still 
in use. 

See also Old St. Paul's Cemetery. 

SALEM BAPTIST CHURCH 

A church by tills name is known to have 
existed on Sec. 34 in Eldorado Twp. (1976 
History, 25), but no map shows its location nor 
could any land deeds be found. 

"Salem" means "perfect" in Hebrew, 
and is an abbreviation of Jerusalem. The word 
is etymologically connected with "shalom" or 
"peace." 

SALEM CEMETERY 

See Chockley Cemetery. 

SALEM CHURCH 

This church, built in 1873 by the 
Lutheran and Methodist societies of Chalmers 
Twp., was located on the SW comer of Sec. 14 
in Chalmers Twp. "north and east of the public 
road." The land was donated in 1872 by .lohn 
Saffell (Deeds: 51/377) "to be used for church 
purposes." A church building is shown only in 
the 1913 atlas and the 1920 plat book of the 
county. In 1924 Salem Lutheran Evangelical 
Congregation merged with Trinity Lutheran 
Church in Macomb (40" Anniversary). The 
Methodist Episcopal Church continued to 
worship there until 1935, at which time the 
building was sold to the township to be used as 
town hall until 1975 (1976 History, 20). 

SALEM MEETING HOUSE OF THE 
UNITED BRETHREN IN CHRIST 
CHURCH 

An 1857 gift of land from the Chockley 
family (Deeds: 3/206) and the 1871 location on 
the map verify the location of this church on the 



99 



NW comer of the SE quarter of Sec. 29 in 
Eldorado Twp., adjacent to the Chockley 
Cemetery. However, the 1861 map shows a 
church on the SE comer of the NW quarter of 
Sec. 29, and the 1876 map shows it on the SW 
comer of the NE quarter of 29. The last two 
sites could not be verified by deeds. Because all 
three sites are adjacent, it is possible that the 
latter two locations were mistakes. 
See Chockley Cemetery. 

SAND CREEK 

This small tributary of the East Fork La 
Moine River tlows from southeast to northwest 
through the SE quarter of Sec. 34 in Emmet 
Twp. The creek is named on the 1893 and the 
1913 county maps. 

SANDHILL 

Located on the NE quarter of Sec. 28 in 
Emmet Twp., this thick deposit of sand has 
always been known by this name. Sand is still 
excavated here (Harris, M.). 



County. The town is located on the SE quarter 
of Sec. 29 and the SW quarter of Sec. 28 in 
Sciota Twp. adjacent to the former Toledo, 
Peoria, and Western Railway. The fertile 
prairie soil of the township made Sciota the 
largest grain shipping operation in the county. 

The name was given after the name of 
the township. 

SCIOTA CEMETERY 

See Spring Creek Cemetery. 

SCIOTA POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on Feb. 
7, 1868 with William H. Franklin as postmaster. 
It was called Amicus and appears by this name 
on Colton's New Map of 1870. On Sept. 20, 
1869 the name changed to Sciota. to confomi to 
the town name. The post office existed until Feb. 
28, 1976 when services were transferred to 
Blandinsville. 

"Amicus" is Latin for friend, tViendly or 
well-wishinti. 



SANDY CREEK 

This was an early name for the upper 
reaches of the La Moine River in Warren 
County and Blandinsville Twp. 

See La Moine River. 

SANFORD CEMETERY 

See White Flock Cemetery. 

SCATTERING RUN BRANCH 

This tributary of the North Fork La 
Mome River Hows through sections 16, 15, 22, 
and 23 of Walnut Cirove Twp. The name of the 
creek appears only in 1855 (RSR. 133). 

SCHOOL NO. 5 

See Number 5 School. 

SCHOOL NO. 16 

See Sixteen School (Eldorado Tv\p.). 

SCIOTA 

laid out on December 23. 1867 by 
.lames W. Hraltlc lor William H Claikc, this 
town was plaited as C'larkes\ illc (Plats: 1:89), 
bul the name hail to be changed because ol' the 
pre\ lous existence of ( 'larkes\ ille in Mclean 



SCIOTA TOWNSHIP 

This is Congressional Township 
7North, 3 West from the 4''' Principal Meridian. 
The name was gi\en in 1857 when McDonough 
government was reorganized and all townships 
acquired proper names. Some sources attribute 
the name to the Scioto County and Ri\ er in Ohio 
from where the early settlers originated. Other 
sources claim that the name honors Molly 
Ilardin, an ancestor of V.M. Hardin, who was 
held capti\e by Scioto Indians (1976 History, 
42). The township was first settled in 1836 by 
Presley Purdy, .lohn llainline, Benjamin Clark 
and V.M. Hardin, all clustered in the SF corner 
of the township, at the heati of Spring Creek and 
north of the Spring Creek settlement. 

Sciota Township has the highest 
ele\ation in the county. The land along the 
WaiTcn County line on sections 5 and 6 is 790 
feet above sea level, and 300 feet higher than the 
La Moine Ri\ er bottom land in I amoinc 1 wp. 

SCOTL.AND SC HO()[ (No. 94) 

This was the name tor Center Point 
School III March of 1947 alter consoluiation 
with Maple (irose. I aununmt, McNair, Lnion 
No. ')5, Oak (iiove, and Camp (reek sclunils. 



100 



SCOTLAND TOWNSHIP 

Congressional Township 5North and 
2West from the 4' Principal Meridian was 
named for the many settlers of 
Scottish origin. Among them are Dr. Charles 
Hay, who lived along Camp Creek in 1832. and 
numerous members of the Walker family, 
including Cyrus Walker, the prominent Illinois 
attorney. The township was informally known 
as "Little Scotland" (Harris, Z.). 



Episcopal Church (Deeds: 7S/41 1), which was 
an addition to land deeded by John Scott in 
1867. The land was to be used "for school and 
religious purposes, e.xcept for the use by 
Mormons and Catholics who do not use the 
King version of the Bible." The plot was one 
acre on the west half of the SW quarter of Sec. 
30 in Bethel Twp. The church closed its doors 
m 1987. 

See also Scott's Cemetery. 



SCOTLAND TOWNSHIP HALL 

The hall was located at Center Point and 
was dedicated in 1908 (MDJ, 3/1 1/1908). 

SCOTLAND TRINITY PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 

Built in 1993 on the site of the Camp 
Creek Presbyterian Church, which was 
destroyed by fire in 1991, this sanctuary now 
houses three previous congregations: Camp 
Creek, Ebenezer, and Bardolph which merged to 
form Scotland Trinity. This is an active rural 
congregation. 

SCOTT'S CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the west 
side of the SW quarter of Sec. 30 in Bethel Twp. 
An 1841 deed from William Holton to ,lohn 
Scott mentions the already existing "burying 
grounds" (Deeds: G/72). The 1842 deed from 
William Holton to trustees of the Union Meeting 
House specifies that the land is for "public 
burying ground" and mentions the meeting 
house, which was then located east of the 
burying ground (Deeds: L/581). Subsequently, 
Joshua Scott deeded additional land (Deeds: 
78/411; 130:442). The first burial was of Olive 
Holton, wife of William Sr. in 1836. The 
cemetery became public in 1927 (Deeds: 
150:442) and is still in use. 

See also Scott's Church. 

SCOTT'S CHURCH 

This Methodist church was organized in 
1841, probably in conjunction with the already 
existing cemetery. In 1842 William Holton sold 
the burying ground to the Union Meeting House. 
The deed mentions the existence of a church 
building east of the grounds (Deeds: L/581). In 
1896 Joshua Scott sold land to the Methodist 



SCOTTSBURC 

This was a station on the Toledo, Peoria 
& Western Railroad, opened in November of 
1870 and located on the NW quarter of Sec, 35 
in Walnut Grove Twp. Initially the stop was 
called Darwin Station, so named by Alorado C. 
Ford, the agent, in honor of his wife Esther J. 
Darwin (1885 History, 1042-3). The opening of 
the Scottsburg Post Office in 1872 led to the 
change in name. 

See also Scottsburg Post Office. 

SCOTTSBURG CEMETERY 

See Pearce Cemetery. 

SCOTTSBURG POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on Oct. 
23, 1872 with George C. Pearce as postmaster. 
It was presumably named for John J. Scott on 
whose farm it was located. The post office 
existed off and on until April 30, 1913, when its 
functions were taken over by the Bushnell Post 
Office. 

SCOTTSBURG SCHOOL 

(No. 7, Walnut Grove Twp.; No. 16) 

Clarke called this school Greenwood (p. 
427). It was built prior to 1861, but no deeds 
could be found to verify the date. The school 
was located on the SE quarter of the SW quarter 
of Sec. 26 in Walnut Cirove Twp., where it 
appears on county maps from 1861 to 1940. It 
was probably the initial meeting place for the 
Greenwood Church. A 1950 deed transferred 
the land into private ownership (Deeds: 
206/331). 

SEAL CREEK 

See Wolfden Branch. 



101 



SEARS SAW MILL 

This is the only existing mill in the 
county. It was started by Harold Sears in 1929 
on the NE quarter of Sec. 29 in Eldorado Twp. 
In 1937 the mill was moved to its present site, 
the north side of Sec. 5, also in Eldorado Twp. 

SEAVVARDSVILLE 

This town was platted on July 23, 1836 
by O.T.L. Martin for William Seaward. The plat 
was located on the SE comer of the NW quarter 
of Sec. 25 in Industry Twp. (Deeds: C/21 1-212), 
just two miles east of Cross Roads. The plat 
was probably a speculative venture attempting to 
take advantage of the population cluster in the 
vicinity, served by a tavern kept by Seaward 
(Commissioners: A/245) and a store belonging 
to Granderson Pennington, who in December of 
1836 was granted a license to "vend, sell and 
retail goods, wares and merchandise" 
(Commissioners: A/301). The plat was located 
along the much-traveled Galena Trail and the 
Rapids Road from Vermont to Fort Edwards 
(present-day Warsaw) on the Mississippi River. 
However, unlike Doddsville, which was also 
platted on that road, Seawardsville never made 
it, probably because it was located too close to 
the already established Cross Roads Settlement. 

SEWARDSVILLE or SEAWARDSVILLE 
POST OFFICE 

fhis post otfice was established on June 
29 1 840, with John Seward as postmaster. It 
was discontinued less than three years later, in 
February of 1843. 

SHANCIKA)! SCHOOL 
(No. 5 Lamoine Twp.; No. 123) 

Clarke docs not list this school nor docs 
the 1885 history of the county, but the 1871 atlas 
shows it on the SI{ corner of the SW quarter of 
Sec. 24 in Lamoine Twp. which is conllrmed by 
an 1892 plat (Deeds: 66/391). The 1893 atlas 
shows it one half mile east on the NE corner of 
Sec. 25 where it remained until 1946. This was 
a union school of 1 anioine and Bethel 
townships. In 1946 it consolidated with the 
School District //1 80 of McDonough and 
Hancock counties. The land was sokl off in 
1M50 (Deeds: 207/13(>). No deed coulil iie loiiiul 



to establish when the school moved to the 
location shown in 1893. 

There is no known reason for the name. 

SHANNON CEMETERY 

See Simpson Cemetery. 

SHANNON LAKE 

The first reference to this small body of 
water is found in the Macomb Journal in 1901 
when the lake was to be expanded to eleven 
acres and already featured a boathouse. 
According to the article it was to become "an 
ideal tlshing place." The lake must have been 
developed sometime between 1893 and 1901 by 
impounding a tributary of the La Moine River. 
It was located on the SE quarter of Sec. 19 in 
Macomb Twp., and is shown on the 1913 and 
the 1919 maps, on property owned by James F. 
Shannon. In 1909 the lake was promoted as a 
source of water for Macomb, but this scheme 
was rejected. It was drained into the La Moine 
River in 1915 (MJ. 9/5/1915, p.4). 

See also Welch's Creek. 

SHAW or SHAWS CREEK, SOUTH FORK 

This stream runs east through sections 
10, 11, 12, and 1 of Mound Twp. and joins Shaw 
Creek in Harris Twp,, Fulton County. Just 
beyond the Fulton County border, the 
impounded stream forms a recreational site 
called "Wildwood Haven." In 1991 Wildwood 
Haven became Cornerstone Farm and a site for 
annual religious festivals. 

SHEEP WASH BRIDGE 

This bridge spans the East Fork La 
Moine River on the township-line road between 
Sec. 13 of Macomb and Sec. 18 of Mound 
townships. 

The name "comes from the time when 
sheep were an important agricultural product of 
the area, fhey were washcil m (his location prior 
to being shipped by rail out of Bardolph" 
(Harris, M.). 

Sin ETSCKMI TERY 

See Upper Mound Cemetery. 

SHI RID AN 

See (iiHul IK^iie. 



102 



SHILOH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

This congregation organized in 1X3^) at 
the residence of Alexander Campbell on Sec. 1 6 
of Walnut Grove Twp. Starting in 1852 
meetings moved to the school building on the 
SE comer of Sec. 8, called "Hickory Grove," 
and the congregation adopted that name. When 
the township was redistricted in 1863, and the 
school was to be in a different location, the 
congregation bought the school building and 
changed its name to Shiloh. The 1871 and 1893 
atlases show the church. When new Presbyterian 
congregations organized in Bushnell in 1868, in 
Good Hope in 1869, and m Walnut Grove in the 
early 1870s, Shiloh parishioners split to join 
these new churches. Walnut Grove Presbyterian 
Church was first called Walnut Grove and 
Shiloh Church (1885 History, 439). No deeds 
could be located. 

It seems that at times Shiloh Church was 
referred to as Sugar Grove Church to coincide 
with Hickory Grove Cemetery, sometimes called 
Sorghum Grove or Sugar Grove Cemetery, but 
this could not be contlrmed. 

Shiloh is an ancient town in central 
Palestine. It is also the location of the 1862 
Civil War battle. The congregation probably 
adopted the new name to honor the battle. The 
church cemetery, however, retained the original 
name Hickory Grove. 

SHOOFLY 

See Adair. 

SHORT FORK LA MOINE RIVER 

This tributary of the East Fork La Moine 
River originates in Sec. 4 of Sciota Twp. and 
trends southeast through Sec. 13 of Sciota and 
sections 18, 19, 20, 29, 28, 27. and 26 of Walnut 
Grove Twp. The stream was probably named in 
reference to the much longer North Fork La 
Moine River. The 1861 map of the county calls 
the stream "West Branch." 

See also Mud Creek and La Moine 
River. 

SIESTA POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on July 
14, 1894 on the SW quarter of Sec. 33 in Bethel 
Twp. to serve the Mt. Zion neighborhood. It 
was discontinued on December 24, 1903, when 



its business was taken over by the Birmingham 
Post Office in Schuyler County. 

Siesta is Spanish for noon or the midday 
rest taken in Spain and some Latin American 
countries. This tongue-in-cheek name might 
have been chosen to imply that the office would 
not be very busy. It is not known who bestowed 
the name or why it was chosen. 

SIM STRADER SCHOOL 

See Long Nine School. 

SIMMONS CEMETERY 

This cemetery, also called Lansdown, is 
located on the NW comer of the NE quarter of 
Sec. 16 in Emmet Twp. In 1838 Emanuel 
Lansdown sold two acres of land (Deeds: 
E/386), and is listed as the owner of adjacent 
land in 1 86 1 . The earliest known grave is that of 
Joseph E. Lansdown in 1855. An 1864 land 
deed from Mankin Champion to James D. 
Simmons for the north half of the west half of 
the NE quarter of Section 16, mentions the 
graveyard which was not included in the 
transaction (Deeds: 16/59). The cemetery is first 
shown on the 1893 map. Most burials are those 
of the two families. The cemetery is now part of 
the Spring Lake Park. 

SIMPSON CEMETERY 

The Shannon t)r Simpson Cemetery is 
located on the NW comer of the SW quarter of 
Sec. 19 in Macomb Twp. The earliest two 
graves are from the 1840s. Shannon children 
were buried here in the 1860s and members of 
the Simpson family in the 1870s and 1880s. The 
cemetery is shown only on the 1893 and the 
1913 county maps. This was a private burial 
ground on the Shannon and Simpson lands and 
no deeds were tound. 

SIXTEEN SCHOOL 

(No. 5, Eldorado Twp.; No.l54) 

This school was built in 1 869 on the 
NW comer of Sec. 22, on land deeded in I860 
by James Mershon (Deeds: 52/524) and in 1873 
by Fielding Berghtol (Deeds: 34/528). Clarke 
already called it "a school known as Si.xteen" 
(Clarke, 418) and the name lasted throughout its 
existence. After consolidation in March of 1947 
the building became the schoolhouse for 



103 



Eldorado School District # 154. The grounds 
were sold off in 1956 (Deeds: 215/410). 

Si.xteen was the name given to schools 
in recognition of the 1818 Act of Congress 
which admitted Illinois to the Union and set 
aside the sixteenth section of each township tor 
the use of schools. The name "Sixteen" thus 
signifies the first attempt at financing public 
education in Illinois. 

See also West Praine Presbyterian 
Church. 

SIXTEEN SCHOOL 

(No. 4, Mound Twp.; No. 74) 

Prior to 1855 a school was taught in 
Edward Dyer's house on the NE quarter of Sec. 
15. Then a building was erected on the SW 
comer of the NW quarter of Sec. 15 where it is 
shown on the 1861 map. The 1871 map shows a 
school building a little east on the section line, 
and just west of the railroad line. The proximity 
to the railroad probably led to the relocation of 
the school onto the NW comer of Sec. 22 in 
1869 (Clarke, 420). This latter location 
remained the school site until June of 1946 when 
the school consolidated into the Sperry School 
District #71. No early deeds could be found but 
the Sec. 22 site was sold in 1946 (Deeds: 
190/287). 

SKEAN'S POND 

See Lake Surprise. 

SMITH CEMETERY 

See Old Plymouth Cemetery. 



SORGHUM CITY 

The 1955 and the 1958 county plat 
books show "Sorghum" on the NE comer of 
Sec. 17 and the adjoining comers of sections 8, 
9, and 16 of Walnut Grove Twp. Other sources 
place "Sorghum" on the SW quarter of Sec. 15, 
close to the center of the township and the sites 
of the town hall, the church and the school. 

Sorghum was an important crop in the 
early days of the county. The canes were 
cmshed to produce sugary symp and molasses. 

See also Sorghum Post Office and 
Shiloh Presbyterian Church. 

SORGHUM GROVE CEMETERY 

See Hickory Grove Cemetery. 

SORGHUM POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on 
March 3. 1893 and discontinued on Febmary 28, 
1903 by transferring its functions to Good Hope. 
According to Macomb Joumal , a post office "to 
be known as 'Sorghum City Comers"" was to be 
established (MJ, 3/23/1893). but the name was 
probably abbreviated by the Post Office 
Department. 

On the 1915 county map of county 
postal routes "Sorghum" appears on the SW 
comer of Section 9. The site was the residence 
of the postmaster Oris I. Hoyt. 

See also Sorghum City. 

SOUTH BRANCH CROOKED CREEK or 
SOUTH BRANCH LA MOINE Rl\ ER 

See La Moine Ri\ cr. 



SNAKE DEN HOLLOW 

See Rattlesnake Den Hollow. 



SOUTH CEMETERY 

See New Hope Cemetery. 



SNAKEDEN BRANCH 

rhis is a stream in Eldorado Twp. It 
runs through sections 21, 28 and 33 and empties 
into the Sugar Creek in Sec. 3 of Oakland Twp. 
m Schuyler County. 

SOLAN CEMETERY 

Sec Pcarcc Cemetery. 

SOLON-ROBINSON CEMETERY 

See Robinson Ccmeterv. 



SPERRY SCHOOL 

(No. 9. Mound Twp.; No. 71) 

First built in 1864, this school was 
located on the NW quarter of Sec. 10 where it 
remained throughout its existence, although no 
early deeds could be located. The name comes 
from C. Sperry who owned the laiul in 1861 and 
was the school's first director I he U'19 (ISGS 
map calls the school "Railroail .Schoiif" because 
It was localetl just east o\' tiic loiedo. Peoria iV: 
Western railroad tracks. Ilie name was not m 
use \ery li>ng. In l')46 Sperr\ became a 



104 



consolidated school district tbr eastern part of 
Pleasant Valley District, the Sixteen School in 
Mound Twp., Mound School, and Crovvl Scliooi. 
The grounds, located on the SE corner of the 
SW quarter of the NW quarter of Sec. 10, were 
sold off in 1961 (Deeds: 239/43). 

SPICER CEMETERY 

See Pearce Cemetery. 

SPIKER SCHOOL 

(No. 2, Blandinsville Twp.; No. 32) 

This school was located on the east side 
of the NE quarter of Sec. 7, on land donated in 
1858 by Phillip Spiker (Deeds: 6/164). First 
shown in 1861, the school retained the name and 
location throughout its existence. The grounds 
were sold off in 1959 (Deeds: 230/300). 

SPRING BRANCH 

Road Survey Records for 1 848 mention 
this creek as located in the SE comer of Sec. 12 
in Walnut Grove Twp. (RSR. 32). The creek 
originates in Sec. 12, runs in a southeasterly 
direction through Sec. 18 and 17 of Prairie City 
Twp., and empties into the Drowning Fork in 
Sec. 21 of Bushnell Twp. 

SPRING CREEK 

This stream originates in the SW comer 
of Sciota Twp. and flows through sections 6, 5, 
8, 17, 16, 15, 22, 21, 18. 33, and 32 of Emmet 
Twp. to empty into the East Fork La Moine 
River in Sec. 5 of Colchester Twp. Upper 
reaches of the Spring Creek were the center of 
an early settlement cluster in the county. The 
creek was fed by numerous springs and had a 
steady water flow. In the early years of 
settlement this flow supported several grain- and 
sawing mills. Presently the creek supplies water 
to Spring Lake. 

See also Spring Creek (settlement) and 
Spring Lake. 

SPRING CREEK (settlement) 

Spring Creek started in the early 1830s. 
The first settlers were William Pennington, on 
Sec. 8, James Head and Ephrami Twitchell on 
Sec. 6, and James Clarke, Caswell Russell, and 
Thomas Hays on Sec. 5. The area offered the 
desirable mix of plentiful timber and border 



prairie. The site also straddled the major state 
road connecting Burlington, Iowa with Macomb 
and Rushville. Peck's gazetteer for 1837 calls it 
-Russell's Cirove," (Peck, 285), probably after 
Caswell Russell. This name was not used 
locally. With the coming of the railroad in the 
mid 1850s stage-coach transportation decreased 
and Spring Creek lost its importance as a 
residential cluster on an important road. 

SPRING CREEK CAMP 

Camp Meeting Association was a 
Methodist Episcopal congregation. which 
organized around 1856 and met originally at the 
Walker Schoolhouse, on the SW comer of Sec. 8 
in Emmet Twp. In 1879 and 1880 the 
Association purchased property from Abraham 
B. Stickle on the NW comer of Sec. 9 m Emmet 
Twp. (Deeds: 47/417; 46/62) where it erected a 
tent and buildings. The Association also changed 
its name to the Macomb District Camp Meeting 
Association. The local name for the site was 
Spring Creek Camp. The grounds were used for 
revival meetings until 1899 (Peter, 74). 

SPRING CREEK CEMETERY or 
GRAVEYARD 

This cemetery, also called Spring Grove, 
Head, Ilumbard or Flumbert, Sciota. and 
Russell, is located west of the NE comer of the 
SE quarter of Sec. 5 in Emmet Twp. It is shown 
hereon all maps. Burials date from the 1830s, 
but the cemetery was platted in 1866 (Deeds: 
23/214) when Thomas W. Head sold two acres 
for a public graveyard in 1867 (Deeds: 18/466). 
The cemetery is not in use any more. The 
different names come from neighboring 
families, many of whom are among the earliest 
settlers of Emmet and Sciota townships. 

SPRING CREEK CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

This congregation organized in the early 
1850s and met in the Walker Schoolhouse until 
1869 when it moved to Sciota to fonn Sciota 
Christian Church. 

See also Walker School. 

SPRING CREEK LAKE 

See Spring Lake. 



105 



SPRING CREEK MILL 

See Clarke's Sawmill. 

SPRING CREEK POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on 
October 25, 1843 with James Head as 
postmaster. It was discontinued on April 10. 
1858, with Bruce Post Office taking over the 
operation. The 1861 map of the county shows 
two locations labeled "Spring Creek P. O." One 
is shown on the west side of the NW quarter of 
the NE quarter of Sec. 5 on C. Humbard's land 
and the other on the SE comer of the NE quarter 
of the SE quarter of Sec. 6 on George Mainline 
Senior's land. The map must have shown the 
locations of both the Spring Creek and Bruce 
post offices. 

See also Bruce Post Office. 

SPRING CREEK RESERVOIR 

See Spring Lake. 

SPRING CREEK SUBDIVISION 

This Macomb subdivision is located on 
the NE quarter of the NW quarter of Sec. 22 in 
Emmet Twp. 

SPRING CREEK TOWNSHIP 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 

See Spring Creek Cemetery. 

SPRING LAKE 

This man-made lake, formed by an 
impoundment of Spring Creek, is located on 
sections 15, 16, and 17 of Emmet Twp. The 
lake was originally built in U)27 (Plats: 3/1 19), 
and enlarged in 1968. It has ser\ed as the 
principal water supply for the city of Macomb. 
The lake is almost totally surrouiulctl by city- 
owned property including .Spring L.ake Park. 
The 1940 plat book of McDonough County calls 
it "Lake Macomb," but this name was not 
common. The lake was first called Spring Creek 
Reservoir, then Spring Creek lake, and finally 
in 1933 Spring Lake. It is the largest body of 
walcr in ihc couiitv. 



SPRING RUN GERMAN BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

This church started in 1879 when the 
Bushnell arm of the German Baptists, or 
"Bushnell Church" split into this congregation 
and Camp Creek Church. The Spring Run 
Church existed from 1879 to 1899, and again 
from 1906 to 1927 (Peter, 171-172). It met in 
the Crowl Schoolhouse. In 1908 German 
Baptist Church became Church of the Brethren, 
commonly known as the Dunkers or Dunkards 
Church. 

The name comes from a spring just 
north of the schoolhouse, shown on the 1 893 
map. 

See also Bushnell Church and Camp 
Creek Church. 

SPRINGER GRAVE 

The grave of Mordecai Springer, who 
died in 1887 and was buried near his residence, 
is all that remains of a cemetery which was 
located just south from the present grave site, on 
the NW quarter of Sec. 26 in Industry Twp. The 
cemetery was called Crossroads or Pleasant 
Grove, because of its proximity to the 
Crossroads settlement and the Pleasant Gro\e 
Methodist Episcopal Church. There is no 
evidence that this cemetery was public, although 
it must have been used as one of the earliest 
burying places in the county. All traces of it 
have long disappeared (Cemeteries: 1 16). 
Lewis Springer owned the SE quarter of Sec. 26 
in 1840 and Charles P. Springer owned in the 
1860s and the 1870s the SW part of the NE 
quarter of Sec. 25. 

See also Industr>'. 

STANDARD CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the south 
side of the SW quarter of Sec. 24 m Industry 
Twp. It is shown only on the 1913 map. In 
1894 A.i. Smith donated land "ti> be used as a 
Public Cemetery in Ihc fouii ot liulustr\" 
(Deeds: 75 234). Most burials date Irom the 
1 S40s to the 1860s. The name probabK comes 
liom the Slaiularil laniiK. which owned adiacent 
land. 



106 



STANDARD SCHOOL 
(No. 4, Industry Tvvp.) 

This school was the predecessor of the 
Pleasant Cirove School, later called Crossroads 
and Dixie School. It was the building of the 
original School District No. 4 in Industry Twp., 
located on the SW comer of Sec. 24, on Gideon 
Standard's land where it appears on the 1861 
county map. It probably ceased to e.xist after 
school districts reorganized in lS5iS when 
Pleasant Grove School was built (Clarke, 742). 

See also Dixie and Crossroads schools. 

STAFF FOST OFFICE 

The application for this post office was 
dated the 9"' of March 1894. The office was to 
replace the Myron Post Office, but apparently 
additional necessary papers were not filed and 
the post office was discontinued eight months 
later on Oct. 31.1 894. The postmaster was .lesse 
Calvert, who was also the postmaster of the 
Myron Post Office. The name comes from the 
Stapp family, whose land holdings were in 
several locations in Emmet Twp. The exact 
location of this post office is not known. 

See also Myron Post Office. 

STEVENS' CEMETERY or GRAVEYARD 

This burial ground is located on the SE 
quarter of Sec. 17 in Colchester Twp., on land 
owned by the Stevens family, the ancestors of 
the mercantile houses of Stevens Brothers in 
Colchester and Chicago, and the U.S. Supreme 
Court justice, Paul Stevens. The graveyard is 
not marked on any map (Cemeteries; 1 1/23-24.), 
but it contains the grave of Lyman Peck, a 
veteran of the War of 1 8 1 2. 

STICKLE CEMETERY 

Stickle Cemetery is located on the SW 
quarter of the SW quarter of Sec. 1 1 in Emmet 
Twp., on land originally owned by Abram 
Stickle. It is a sizeable cemetery, which served 
the neighborhood families, even though it was 
on private property. The cemetery was located 
southeast of the Stickle Methodist Episcopal 
Church. The earliest burials of Abram Stickle's 
wife and daughter were in 1839, but the 
cemetery is first shown on the I9L'^ map. 

It is reputed that just south of the 
cemetery there is a mass grave of thirty-six 



pioneers who died in the plague of 1 849 and 
1851 (Stickle). The identity of the burials is not 
known. They may have been travelers or 
migrants on the Burlington Rt)ad. 

See also Halfway House (Emmet Twp.) 

STICKLE METHODIST EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

This congregation organized in 1845 
and met for nine years in the Timber and Union 
schoolhouses. In 1854 it built its sanctuary on 
the west side of the SW quarter of Sec. 1 1 in 
Emmet Twp. In 1 860 Abram Stickle donated 
land for the church "known as Stickle" 
(Mortgages; N/353). It is not known when the 
congregation ceased to function. Church records 
stop with 1888, but the church is a preaching 
point in 1913 and the building is shown on 
county maps through 1919. A 1923 land deed 
from the trustees of the Stickle Methodist 
Church transfers the ownership of the land to 
Alfred Stickle (Deeds; 141/628). 

STICKLE SCHOOL 

See Union School (No. 1, Emmet Twp.; 

No. 51) 

STONE QUARRIES 

Most stone quarries mentioned in the 
historical sources were located west of Macomb 
and were operated from the 1850s to the 1880s. 

Stewart's quarry was located two miles 
west of Macomb (1885 History, 68), McLean's 
was located one half mile west of Stewart's, and 
Oakman's was located on the east half of the SE 
quarter of Sec. 23 in Colchester Twp. In 
addition, the 1885 history of the county lists 
Randolph's and Bartelson's quarries (1885 
History, 70), locations unknown. 

STONEKING CEMETERIES 

There are two Stoneking cemeteries, 
both in Bethel Twp. The larger one, located on 
the east side of the SW quarter of Sec. 28, is a 
public cemetery incorporated in 1920 
(Incorporations; 1/218). It started in the 1860s 
on land owned by John Stoneking. Jr. The 
cemetery is first shown on the 1893 map and 
Stoneking family members are among the first 
burials. The cemetery is still in use. 



107 



The Stoneking graves, located on the 
NE quarter of the SE quarter of Sec. 33 in Bethel 
Twp., is all that remains of the small family 
burial plot. The graves of two small children of 
J.G. Stoneking in the 1850's are identified, but 
eight other field stones are unknown graves. 
The land belonged to John Stoneking, Sr., and 
the plot is not shown on any county map. The 
burials predate those in the Stoneking Cemetery 
on Sec. 28. 



name comes from the mill later known as 
Hagan's Sawmill. 

See also Hagan's Sawmill. 

SUGAR CREEK CUMBERLAND 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

See Foster Point Presbyterian Church. 

SUGAR CREEK PRECINCT 

See Eldorado Township. 



STOOKEY SCHOOL 

(No. 6, Lamoine Twp.; No. 122) 

According to Clarke this school was 
built in 1870. It is not shown in the 1871 atlas, 
but appears on all later maps of the county. It 
was located on the SE comer of the NE quarter 
of Sec. 15 in Lamoine Twp. It was part of the 
so-called Dog Town neighborhood, and was 
sometimes called Hidden Nook School (1976 
History, 33). It closed in the 1950s. The name 
Stookey, sometimes spelled "Stooker" or 
"Stokey", is after Benjamin Stookey, who 
owned nearby land in the 1870s and in 1893. 
No land deeds were found. 

STRADER SCHOOL 

See Long Nine School. 

STRADER-NANKIVEL CEMETERY 

This family cemetery is located on the 
NW quarter of Sec. 34 in Chalmers Twp., on 
land owned in 1X71 by Simeon Strader. The 
John Nankivel family owned land on the SW 
quarter of Sec. 34. The cemetery is shown only 
on the 1913 county map. No deeds could be 
located. Burials date from l83Sto 1902. 

strinc;t()\vn 

See Ragtov\n. 

SUGAR CREEK 

This creek originates in Sec. 10 ot 
Eldorado rwp., exits through Sec. 1 into Fulton 
County, enters McDonough County again in 
Sec. 30, and exits through sections 35 and 36 
into Schuyler Countv. The name fust ap|iears in 
1832 (Commissioners: A/83). It pri)bably 
indicates the presence of sugar maples along its 
course. On liiulleys 1833 map anil Mitciieirs 
18Vt m,ip (he cicek is calkxi Mill Cieck flic 



SUGAR GROVE CHURCH and 
CEMETERY 

See Hickory Grove Cemetery and 
Shiloh Presbyterian Church. 

SULLIVAN CEMETERY 

See Archer-Bethel Cemetery. 

SUMMIT SCHOOL 

(No. 7, New Salem Twp.; No. 87) 

The original location of a school in this 
neighborhood was on the NW comer of the SE 
quarter of Sec. 25, on land donated by Joseph 
Lowns in 1851 (Deeds: PI 15). After 
redistricting in 1857 the school was built on the 
SW comer of Sec. 25, on land donated in 1 860 
by Amasa Jacobs (Deeds: 7/345). It operated in 
this location until the early 1940s and was 
always known by this name. The land was sold 
by trustees in 1946 (Deeds: 190 203). The 
school served as a place of worship for the 
Centennial Methodist Episcopal congregation 
from 1871 to 1876. 

SUMMIT SCHOOL (Eldorado Twp.) 

This name appears only once. It must 
have been a school better known b\ a different 
name but it is not kiu)wn which school this was. 

SUNN\ SIDE SCHOOL 
(No. 9, Hire Twp.; No. 4X) 

I'his school was built in 1863 on the SE 
corner of Sec. 30 in Hire fw]-! , on land 
purchased from Milton T. Hunt (Deeds: 11,35). 
'Hie building was situated on a Hat stretch of 
praine. Prior lo the use of field dram liles such 
land during wet seasons often had standing 
water ilue lo jtoor drainage. fhe school was 
locali\ known as Froi; i'oiui School (1976 



OS 



History, 29). The grounds passed into private 
ownership in 1949 (Deeds: 206/19). 

SURPRISE LAKE 

See Lake Surprise. 

SWAMP SCHOOLHOUSE 

See Maple Grove School (Scotland 
Tvvp.) 

SWITZER SCHOOL 

See Pleasant Hill School. 

SYCAMORE FORD 

See Jones Ford. 



109 



T,U,V 



TABLER CEMETERY 

See King Cemetery. 

TAINTER SCHOOL 

See Maple llill School. 

TANK SCHOOL (No. 26) 

This school was located on the NE 
corner of Sec. 35 in Sciota Tvvp. It is first 
shown on the 1893 map, but it is mentioned as 
having existed as early as 1879 (1885, p. 945). 
No deeds could be located to verify the dates of 
origin or termination. The name comes from its 
location near the water tank of the Toledo, 
Peoria & Warsaw Railroad (1976 History, 43). 
The 1918 U.S.G.S. quadrangle map of Good 
Hope calls the school "Franklin School," 
probably after William H. Franklin, the first 
postmaster in Sciota. The 1940 plat of the 
county marks the school as "Good Hope," but 
this seems to be a mistake, unless it was to 
indicate that the school had consolidated with 
the Good Hope School located in town. 

TENNESSEE 

Tennessee was laid out on Apr. 3, 1854 
on the north half of Sec. 22 in Tennessee Tvvp. 
by Thomas K. Waddle, Joseph B. Bacon, and 
Steve Cockerham (Deeds: V/2-3). Like 

Bardolph, Bushnell, Colchester, Colmar, and 
Prairie City, Tennessee was platted to take 
advantage of the C.B. & Q. railroad line through 
the county. Reflecting the primary function of 
the town, Tennessee was called "Tennessee 
Station" in the 1871 atlas. In the 1876 atlas it 
was "Tennessee Station & Post Office." Like 
all towns which sprang up next to the railroad, 
lennessee streets run parallel and at right angles 
to the tracks, not conforming to the strict east- 
west and north-south orientation of towns which 
predate the railroad. 

1 he name ot the town precedes the 
naiiie of the township, and was given after the 
state where l.arkin C. Bacon came from .loseph 
B. Bacon was Larkin's son. 



TENNESSEE CATHOLIC CHURCH 

See Sacred Heart Church. 

TENNESSEE POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on 
April 1, 1856. 

TENNESSEE SPRINGS 

See Vishnue Springs. 

TENNESSSEE STATION 
See Tennessee. 

TENNESSEE TOWNSHIP 

When the tlrst township organization in 
McDonough County was effected in 1857, 
Congressional Township 5North and Range 
4West from the 4''^ Principal Meridian was 
named Tennessee in honor of the home state of 
many of the settlers. Township reorganization 
in 1880 created Colchester Twp. out of western 
part of Chalmers Twp. and eastern part of 
Tennessee Twp. The present Tennessee Twp. is 
a so-called fractional township, lacking sections 
1, 12, 13, 24, 25, and 36, and the eastern half of 
the sections 2, 11, 14, 23. 26, and 35. 

ITENESSEE TOWNSHIP CHURCH) 

The map of 1861 shows a church 
building on the NE comer of Sec. 27. It was 
located on .1. Talmen land but no deeds and no 
further information could be found. 

THOMAS CORNER or CROSSROADS 

See New Philadelphia. 

THOMPSON COLLEGE 
(No. 6, Hire Twp.; No. 45) 

According to Clarke, this school was 
erected m 1872 on the NE corner of Sec. 23 
(Clarke, p. 432), but an 1864 deed from Henry 
C. Cirittlth to S.K. Pendnck (Mortgages: S 135) 
seems to be the actual starting date of the school 
which probably preceded the 1872 building. 
The school remained in existence until 1955, 
when the school kit was sold (Deeds: 215 313). 

No reason could be fouiKl lor the 
schoors name. 



110 



TIMBER or TIMBER CREEK SCHOOL 

(No. 2, Emmet Twp.; No. 52) 

This school seems to have been the 
successor to Clarke's School in the Spring Creek 
settlement. It started in 1S40 or 1<S41 in a log 
cabin built by general contribution and located 
on the east side of the creek probably near the 
quarter section line between the NW and the SW 
quarters of Section 4. The school was moved 
shortly afterwards and an 1 845 deed from 
George Mainline locates it on the SE comer of 
the SW quarter of Sec. 5 (Deeds: .1/342), but it 
does not show on the 1861 map. In 1869 the 
school was again moved onto land deeded by 
Januson N. Mainline and located 94 rods east of 
the SW comer of Sec. 5 (Deeds: 27/603), where 
it is shown on maps from 1871 to 1893. In 1902 
the schoolhouse was moved again, across the 
valley, to the north side of the NE quarter of 
Sec. 7 onto land deeded in 1903 by Virginia A. 
Mainline (Deeds: 91/175). It remained in this 
location until 1947, when it consolidated with 
the Blandinsville-Sciota School District # 175. 
The grounds were sold off m 1949 (Adair W. B., 
2/10/1949). 

The name comes from the "growth of 
timber" which had to be removed as condition of 
sale (Deeds: J/342). 

See also Clarke Walker schools. 

TOLANS BRANCH 

This small stream in Eldorado Twp. is 
the tributary of the West Branch Sugar Creek in 
Schuyler County. Tolans Branch Hows south 
between sections 29 and 30, and 3 1 and 32. It is 
named for William Toland who owned land in 
Sec. 32. 

TOLEDO, PEORL\ & WESTERN 
RAILWAY 

This is the best-known name for the rail 
line which crosses the county from east to west 
through towns of New Philadelphia. Bushnell, 
Good Mope, Sciota and Blandinsville. The line 
was built in 1861 as Mississippi and Wabash 
Valley Railroad. It became Toledo, Peoria and 
Warsaw Railroad in 1868 and Toledo, Peoria & 
Western in 1887. The line was sold several 
times between the 1990s and 2005. It is 
presently owned by the Keokuk .lunction 
Railway Company (MJ 12/12/2004, p. 2B). 



TOWN FORK 

This tributary of the Farmers Fork 
originates in Sciota Twp. and flows through 
sections 16, 22, 26, and 35 of Sciota, and 
sections 31, 32, and 33 of Walnut Grove Twp. to 
join Farmers Fork in Sec. 4 of Maccuub Twp. 
The creek runs just south of Good Mope and 
probably owes its name to the town. The 
earliest known name of this stream was Brush 
Creek, so called in 1857 (Commissioners: 
D/278). The name persisted until 1914 as 
reported by postmasters William Blandin, David 
Campbell and Sude E. Neale (Site). It is not 
known when Brush Creek became Town Fork. 

TOWN FORK or TOWN BRANCH 

See K.illjordan Creek. 

TROUBLESOME CREEK 

This is one of the major watercourses in 
the county. It originates in the northeastern 
Scotland Twp. and Hows southwest to join La 
Moine River in Sec. 16 of Lamoine Twp. The 
early name of this stream was Turkey Creek as 
reported in Peck's gazetteer (Peck, 89), shown 
on the Lewis Robinson map of 1838, and also 
reported by Fandon's postmaster in 1871 (Site). 
"Trouble Creek," however, was already used in 
1834 (Commissioners: Ayi66), and the name 
"Troublesome" appears on the 1861 map, so the 
two names must have been used concurrently. 
The presence of wild turkeys undoubtedly led to 
the early naming. The present name is attributed 
to a government sur\'eyor who could not cross 
the creek because of its almost perpendicular 
banks. The county was originally surveyed 
before 1818, but some parts were later 
resurveyed. The name does not appear on early 
surveys. 

TROUBLESOME CREEK BRIDGES 

Troublesome Creek had three bridges, 
shown on the 1861 map. The bridge on the SE 
quarter of Sec. 29 in Chalmers Twp. was 
mentioned in 1834 and was on the road from 
Middleton to the mills on the La Moine River. 
The bridge mentioned in 1 842 was located on 
Sec 23 in Chalmers Twp. (Commissioners: 
A/213), and another early bridge over 
Troublesome Creek was on the west side of the 
SE quarter of Sec. 29 in Lamoine Twp. 



11 



TUCKER TOWN 

This nickname refers to the 
neighborhood around the Lamoine Mill and 
bridge on Sec. 21 of Lamoine Twp. A family by 
the name of Tucker used to reside in Lamoine 
Twp., one burial having been recorded in Scott 
Cemetery. Another explanation found in 
American Placenames is that the name may 
derive from "tuckered out." It may refer to the 
disappearance of the mill and the adjacent 
settlement. 

See also La Moine (settlement). 

TUNNICLIFF GROVE or LAKE 

This recreational spot, mentioned in the 
Macomb Dailv Journal of Sept. 3, 1902, was 
located on the NW quarter of Sec. 21 in 
Macomb Twp., just east of the Crabb Bridge. 
The lake was part of the East Fork La Moine 
River flood plain and was just north of the river 
channel. Damon G. Tunnicliff was a prominent 
Macomb lawyer. The land belonged to the 
family from 1866 to 1912, during which time it 
was called "Grove" and was the favorite 
gathering site for the Macomb's elite. The 1913 
county atlas labeled the body of water "Lake." 

TURKEY CREEK 

See Troublesome Creek. 

TURTLE CREEK 

See La llarpe Creek. 

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH OF BETHEL 
TOWNSHIP 

See Union Church (Bethel Twp.) 

UNION CHAPEL 

This ciuirch was located on the south 
side of the SW quarter of Sec. 13 in Scotland 
Twp., just east of the LJiuon School. An ISSl 
gift of land from Manson lierndon to the 
"trustees of the Church of United Brethren in 
Christ, known as Union Chapel," confirms the 
location (Deeds: 49/445). The church was 
shown only on the 1893 map. Services 
disconliiuicd in I MOO. 



leadership of Elder John Logan and Stephen 
Strickland. Members included many of the most 
prominent early settlers in Bethel Twp. The 
house of worship was located on the SW quarter 
of the SW quarter of Sec. 10 on land deeded in 
1847 by Benjamin Mathews to "trustees of 
Predestination Baptist Church known and 
described as the Union Church" (Deeds: L/382). 
This was originally a United Baptist Church and 
was sometimes called Union Baptist Church of 
Bethel Township, but a year after organization it 
became the Regular, Primitive, or Old School 
Baptist denomination. The church mo\ed to 
Middleton, now Fandon, in 1873. The Fandon 
Church ceased operation in 1932 (Peter, 14-15). 

UNION CHURCH (Blandinsville Twp.) 
See Union House. 

UNION CHURCH (Industry Twp.) 

According to the 1871 atlas, this was the 
first church in Industry Township. It was 
erected in 1848 on Sec. 25. No deed could be 
located to verify the e.xact location, but the 
church probably served the Vance's Settlement 
on Sec. 24, and Carter's Settlement on Sec. 26. 
The building was used by different 
denominations (1871 map, te.\t, p. 70). It is 
known that a Methodist Episcopal congregation 
met in the Union Church building until 1866, 
after which time it moved to its new house of 
worship in the town of Industry (Peter. 92-94). 
The Union Church itself was probably in 
existence until 1857 when the Methodist Church 
at Crossroads was built. 

See also Pleasant Gro\e Methodist 
F,pisct)pal Church. 

UNION CHURCH (Lamoine Twp.) 
See White Flock Church 

UNION DI.STRICTS (Bethel Tup.) 

Bethel Twp. had three union districts. 
In 1859 Union District No. 3 was with Chalmers 
Twp. This school later became Fandon School. 
Union districts No 2 (West Bethel) and No. 5 
(Shanghai ) \sere wilh I anmiiie 1 wp. 



UNION CHURCH (Bethel I up.) 

Ihis was the fust church in McDniiougii 
County It oruani/cil in I82S (Webb) under the 



UNION DISTRICTS (Bushnell and Prairie 
City townships) 

In 1859 there was one union district 
with Fuhon County, but by 1S79 there are three 
union school districts for the two townships 
(Clarke, 421). The school in District No. 4 was 
called Maple Hill School, the school in District 
No. 5 was called Number 5 School, and the 
school in District No. 6 was called Brock 
School. In 1940 there are two union districts 
with Fulton County, # 205, called Curtis, and 
# 206, called Maple Hill. 

UNION DISTRICTS (Chalmers Twp.) 

Children from the township attended 
four union schools over the years. In 1 859 
School District No. 1 was with Colchester Twp. 
This later became Union District No. 6 which 
was the school in Colchester. Original Union 
District No. 3, later known as No. 12, was the 
Fandon School. The schoolhouse of the Union 
District No.l in 1878 was the Cottage Corner 
School in Bethel Twp., and Union District No. 8 
was the Hume School in Colchester Twp. 

UNION DISTRICTS (Emmet Twp.) 

Union District No. 5 had two 
schoolhouses, one on Sec. 1 in Emmet Twp. 
called Pilot Knob, and one on Sec. IS m 
Macomb Twp. called Prairie Hill School. 

UNION DISTRICTS (Lamoine Twp.) 

Over the years the township had three 
union districts. On the 1859 plat District No. 2 
was with Bethel Twp. and the school was known 
as West Bethel. Also in 1859, District No. 5 
was with Bethel Twp. and the school was 
Shanghai. Later redistricting resulted in Union 
District # 200 with Hancock County, called 
North Colmar. 

UNION DISTRICTS (Macomb Twp.) 

The 1 859 plat of school districts shows 
three union districts: No. 2 with Mound Twp., 
which later became Bardolph School, No. 4 with 
Walnut Grove Twp., known as Hamilton School, 
and No. 5 with Emmet Twp. w ith schools called 
Prairie Hill and Pilot Knob. In later years 
Bardolph became an independent district and 
District No. 4 became No. 3. 



UNION DISTRICTS (Sciota Twp.) 

In 1859 Sciota Twp. had two union 
school districts: No. 2 with Blandinsville Twp. 
and No. 3 with Walnut (irove Twp. In 1867 
Sciota Twp. districts reorganized and the two 
union districts resulted in three schools: 
Lombard, and Muddy Lane from District 2 and 
from district No. 3 the Good Hope School, 
which was built in 1861 and was first located on 
the SW comer of Sec. 30 in Walnut Gro\e Twp. 
It moved into town in 1 874. 

UNION DISTRICTS (Tennessee Twp.) 

In 1859 fcnncssee Twp. had two union 
districts: No. 1 with Colchester Twp., and No. 7 
with Hire Twp. When Clarke wrote his history 
there were four union districts. District No. 6 
was the school in Colchester, District No. 7 was 
the Bean School in Colchester Twp., District 
No. 8 (previously District No. 7) was Argyle 
School in Hire Twp., and District No. 9 (with 
Hancock Co.) was Centennial School (Clarke, 
p. 43 1 ). 

UNION DISTRICTS (Walnut Grove Twp.) 

In 1859 the township had Union District 
No. 3 with Sciota Twp. and Union District No. 4 
with Macomb Twp. District No. 3 eventually 
became the Good Hope School, while District 
No. 4 became District No. 8 with a schoolhouse 
called Hamilton. 

UNION HOUSE 

A building by this name, located on Sec. 
21 in Blandinsville Twp., built in 1832, was the 
house of worship for two congregations, the 
Baptist and the Cambelites or Reformers, and 
also served as the first school in the 
neighborhood (1871 map, text, p. 40). "Very 
soon great dissatisfaction was experienced by 
the Baptists which led to the abandonment of the 
Union House" (1885 History, 462). Their new 
church called New Hope was built southeast of 
Blandinsville in Hire Twp. The Christian 
congregation, named Liberty moved to 
Blandinsville in 1849. The Union House was 
also referred to as the "Baptist Meeting Place." 
The building is not shown on any map of the 
county. 

See also New Hope Baptist Church, 
Liberty Christian Church, and Liberty Cemetery. 



113 



UNION MEETING HOUSE (Bethel Twp.) 
See Scott's Church. 

UNION SCHOOL 

(No. 1, Emmet Twp.; No. 51) 

This school started in 1840 on the SE 
quarter of Sec. 10. It was called Haynes School 
House after James Haynes who in 1843 deeded 
land (Mortgages: B/419). In 1852 a school 
house is mentioned close to the NE comer of the 
SE quarter of Sec. 9 (R.S.R., 97). In 1854 this 
buildmg was destroyed, and quickly rebuilt, this 
time on the south side of the NW quarter of Sec. 
10. The 1861 map shows a school building on 
the SE quarter of Sec. 3 and the 1871 and the 
1876 atlases show a school on the NE quarter of 
Sec. 1 1 , which later was the site of Stickle 
Church. In 1881 the Sec. 10 grounds were sold 
by school trustees (Deeds: 47/190) and a new 
site was purchased from Francis M. Painter on 
the south side of the NE quarter of Sec. 9 
(Deeds: 46/311) where it is shown on county 
maps from 1893 to 1940. The district was 
consolidated into the Bushnell-Prairie City 
District in 1947 and the site sold in 1950 (Adair 
W. B.. 2/9/1950; Deeds: 206/17). In 1907 the 
school was called "Painter School," (MDJ 
5/2/1907, p.4), but the 1919 map shows it as 
"Stickler (sic) School." The latter name refers to 
the numerous members of the Stickle family 
who served as school directors. In 1940 this was 
"Union School." 

UNION SCHOOL 

(No. 6, Scotland Twp.; No. 95) 

This school was built in 1857 on land 
deeded to the trustees in 1858 by William Kyle 
(Deeds: 4/719). It was located on the SW comer 
of Sec. 13 where it is shown in 1861. It 
remained m the location until the consolidation 
into Scotland School District ft 94 in 1947, 
although the 1893 atlas shows the school on the 
SW corner of Sec. 14. The grounds were sold 
offm 1948 (Deeds: 190/577). 

UNITED BRETHREN C HURCH OF HIRE 
TOWNSHIP 

Sec Elm (irove United Brethren Church 



UNITED BRETHREN CHURCH OF 
LAMOINE TOWNSHIP 

See Lamoine Chapel. 

UNITED BRETHREN CHURCH OF 
SCOTLAND TOWNSHIP 

See Union Chapel. 

UNITED BRETHREN IN CHRIST 
CHURCH OF MACOMB TOWNSHIP 

See Jerusalem United Methodist 
Church. 

UNITED BRETHREN IN CHRIST 
CHURCH OF SCIOTA TOWNSHIP 

See Pleasant Gale United Brethren 
Church. 

UNITED BRETHREN IN CHRIST 
CHURCH OF WALNUT GROVE 
TOWNSHIP 

See Centre Chapel. 

UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF 
CHALMERS TOWNSHIP 

This church was located on the SW 
comer of the SE quarter of Sec. 5 in present-day 
Colchester Twp. on land donated to tmstees in 
1865 by P.F. Cheeseman (Deeds: 17/159). The 
church is shown on an 1869 plat (Deeds: 
29/159) and also on the 1871 atlas of the county. 
It apparently closed m 1875 when land re\erted 
back to Cheeseman (Deeds: 39/428). 

UPPER MOUND CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the NE 
comer of the SE quarter of Sec. 14 in Mound 
Twp. The cemetery was established in 1854 
when George W. Sheets deeded land to the State 
of Illinois as the ""burynig ground for school 
district mhabilaiits" (Deeds: 7 393). The 
ccmeter\ is shown on all county maps starting 
with 1861. Hie cemetery is also kiunsn as Dver. 
High Mound, Sheets, and Mound United 
Brethren Cemetery. It is not used any more. 

See also Mound United Brethren 
(luirch. 

UPPER MOUND liNITED BREIHREN 
C HUR( II 

See Mound United Biethien ('luiieli. 



14 



UPPER RAPIDS 

This name, although not in McDonough 
County, is often used in early county road 
records. It refers to the rapids of tiic Mississippi 
River with foot at Roci< Island. Cialena Road 
connected present Beardstown with Fort 
Armstrong at the rapids. 

See also Lower Rapids. 

VAIL CEMETERY 

This family graveyard is located on the 
west side of the SW quarter of Sec. 14 in 
Industry Twp., on Vail family land at the east 
edge of the town of Industry. Thomas Vail 
moved to McDonough County in 1834 and first 
burials date from the late 1830s. The cemetery 
was located close to the residence of his son 
John B. The cemetery is shown on the 1893 and 
the 1913 maps of the county. No deeds could be 
located. 



neighborhood around Sec. 32 in Scotland and 
Sec. 24 in Industry Twp. where Vance 
homestcadcd would have been known as 
Vance's Settlement. 

See also Rogers Settlement and 
Walker's CJrove Post Office. 

VAVVTER CEMETERY 

This cemetery is located on the NE 
quarter of the N\V quarter of Sec. 14 in Bethel 
Twp., three-fourths mile west of the fonner site 
of the East Bethel Church. It is a family burial 
plot, with interments dating from 1835 to 1918. 
John C. Vawter is known to have owned the site 
from 1840 on. The cemetery is also known as 
Calvin Cemetery (1976 History, 15) because 
three Calvin children were buried there. The 
Calvin family owned land south of the cemetery. 
No deeds could be located and the cemetery 
does not appear on any map. 



VANCE CEMETERY 

This large cemetery is located on the 
north side of the NW quarter of Sec. 24 in 
Industry Twp. One of the first burials was 
James Vance, Sr., an early McDonough settler. 
He died in 1835 and was buried on what used to 
be his farm. The cemetery became a township 
cemetery in 1862 through a gift of land by the 
Vance family (Deeds: 12/465). It is shown on 
maps from 1 893 and is still in use. 

VANCE'S MILL 

This was an early horse-powered mill 
that ground com. Built by James Vance 
(Mclean, 637) it was probably part of the Vance 
settlement. It is not known how long it operated. 

VANCE'S SETTLEMENT 

Among clusters of population in 
McDonough County in 1837. Peck's Gazetteer 
mentions "Vance's Settlement." According to 
Peck, this settlement was located "in five north, 
two and three west, six or eight miles southwest, 
from Macomb and on the waters of Crooked 
Creek" (Peck, 305). "Crooked Creek" is 
obviously a mistake. The creek in the area 
described by Peck is Camp Creek. In 1832 John 
Rogers sold to John Vance the SE quarter of 
Sec. 32 in Scotland Twp. and the NE quarter of 
Sec. 5 in Industry Twp. so five years later the 



VENARD SCHOOL 

See East Bethel School. 

VERMONT CITY RESERVOIR 

This is a small man-made lake 
surrounded by a park located on sections 24 and 
25 in Eldorado Twp. The lake was built in 1942 
by damming a tributary of Sugar Creek. It 
supplies water to the town of Vermont in Fulton 
County. 

VICTOR SCHOOL 

(No. 6, Bethel Twp.; No. 135) 

The first school in this neighborhood 
seems to have been located on the SE comer of 
the west half of the SW quarter of Sec. 25 on 
land donated in 1858 by Michael Rings 
(Mortgages: N/15). In 1875 a school was built 
on the south side of the SW quarter of Sec. 25 
on land donated by B.F. Irish (Deeds: 34/406). 
but it is not shown on maps until 1913. It stayed 
in this location until 1947. when it consolidated 
into the Bethel School District #133. It was part 
of the well known Victor neighborhood. 

The name "Victor" appears already in 
Clarke (p. 708) and remains in use well into the 
20''' Century. The building and grounds were 
sold in 1950 (Adair W.B.. 12/12/1950; Deeds 
206/283). 



115 



No explanation could be found for this 
name. 

VICTORY BAPTIST CHURCH 

This church, a splinter from the Calvary 
Baptist Church of Macomb, organized in 1981 at 
the 4-H Center on the west edge of Macomb. In 
1983 the congregation moved into Macomb 
where it worshipped until 1998, when it 
acquired the building previously occupied by the 
Aldersgate Church. 

See also Aldersgate Church. 

VISHNU or VISHNUE SPRINGS 

The plat of the "Town of Vishnu" 
located on the SE quarter of Sec. 7 in Tennessee 
Twp., was fUed on August 27, 1889 by Darius 
Hicks and John Mourning (Plats: 2/36) and the 
place is shown on maps from 1893 to 1913. The 
original plat was soon followed by Way's 
additions to the south and by the plat of "North 
Vishnu Springs" in the NE quarter of Sec. 7, 
filed by O.A. Young and Isaac Luce (Plat: 2/47). 
This frenzy of land speculation started when 
Darius Hicks opened a hotel ne.xt to a spring 
with mineral water said to have healing powers. 
North Vishnu Springs, sometimes referred to as 
"Luce City," also had a spring and a hotel. The 
places remained popular for a decade or two but 
then healing with mineral water went out of 
fashion. 

Prior to the platting of the town of 
Vishnu, the springs were known as Tennessee 
Springs. When Rush Medical College examined 
the water and pronounced it "healthful," the spa 
promoter, Darius Hicks, renamed the springs 
"Vishnuc," the name of a Hindu god credited 
with the ability to heal the sick, the lame, and 
the blmd. Today, only the spring, the run-down 
hotel building and the alluring name reniam. In 
2003 the property was donated to Western 
Illinois University. 

Sec also Luce City Springs. 

VISHNUE POST OFFICE 

This post office was established i>n .lune 
15, 1845 with lAlward N. McKee as postmastei. 
It was located on the SW quarter of Sec. 7 in 
lennesscc lup. fhe services transferred to 
Colchester March '<\. U)OS. 



w 



WALKER AND MILLER'S MILL 

See Hummer's Mill. 

WALKER CEMETERY or GRAVEYARD 

This cemeter>' is located on the NW 
comer of the SW quarter of Sec. 8 in Emmet 
Twp., on land donated by James W. Walker in 
1853 (Deeds: S/'173). Even though this was a 
public cemetery, it is not shown on county maps 
due to its small size. The first burials were in 
the early 1 850s. The cemetery is sometimes 
called "Old Walker Cemetery," "Old Pennington 
Cemetery," or "Pennington Cemetery No. 1 ." It 
is the resting place of some of the oldest settlers 
in the Spring Creek neighborhood, as well as 
veterans of the War of 1812 and the Ci\ il War. 

WALKER CHURCH 

See Walker School. 

WALKER SCHOOL 

(No. 6, Emmet Twp.) 

An 1853 land transaction between James 
W. Walker and trustees of District No. 6 marks 
the beginning of this school and the adjacent 
burial grounds (Deeds: S/173). The site was just 
east of the SW comer of the NW quarter of 
Sec. 8, where it is shown on an 1 868 plat 
(Deeds: 23/209). It is believed that Walker 
School started when "the people in the Timber 
School District had a 'falling out' concerning 
political questions (possibly slavery) and some 
of them seceded from the district" (Newsletter, 
8:2/7). The Walker School buildmg seems to 
have stood until around 1890, but was used as a 
school only until 1863 or 1864. At this time due 
to redistricting a new school was built and called 
Guy School. The pupils of the Walker School 
transferred to the new Guy and Timber schools. 

Despite its short existence Walker 
School was described by several eyewitnesses 
(Pioneers, 312-313: Genealogy 12:4/671). It 
was primarily a schoolhouse but it was also a 
house of worship for the Spring Creek Christian 
Church until 1869 and the Spring Creek Camp 
Meeting Association until 1879. (Peter, 74). 



See also Timber School, Oak Grove 
School and Spring Creek Camp. 

WALKER'S GROVE POST OFFICE 

This post ottlce had a tenuous existence. 
It was established on Feb. 1, 1836 with John M. 
Walker as postmaster, but lasted only until May 
5, 1837. It was reestablished on Sept. 9, 1850, 
and lasted until Oct. 9, 1852. Sometime after, it 
must have been reinstated because records show 
that it was closed again on Oct. 9, 1857, and 
again reopened on Oct. 29, 1857 this time as 
Mariposa P.O. It finally closed on Aug. 16, 
1858. The last postmaster was William 
Knowles. 

The location of the post office, which 
seems to have anchored a neighborhood known 
as Walker's Grove and even as "Walkersville," 
was on Sec. 5 of Industry Twp. where both John 
M. Walker and William Knowles owned 
properties. The neighborhood is one of the 
oldest in the county. Prior to the Walker family, 
the vicinity was known as Roger's Settlement. 
The location of the post office was well-marked 
on early maps. Burr's maps for 1836 and 1839 
locate it in the NW comer of Industry Twp., and 
Peck's Gazetteer places it 7 miles south of 
Macomb (Peck, 308). The name appears on 
maps as late as 1864. 

WALNUT GROVE 

William J. Eddie laid out an unnamed 
town plat for D.B. Keith in 1870 (Deeds: 
35/301 ). The plat was located on the SE quarter 
of Sec. 1 in Walnut Grove Twp., on the line of 
the St. Louis Division of the C.B. & Q. Railroad. 

The proposed town was subsequently 
named after the township in which it was 
located. The name is still used for the 
neighborhood, but the town never developed. 

WALNUT GROVE CEMETERY 

This cemetery of the Walnut Grove 
Cumberland Presbyterian Church was 
established in 1838. The cemetery is located on 
the SE quarter of the SE quarter of Sec. 32. It is 
also known as Hamilton Cemetery because Levi 
Hamilton donated land to the church in 1854 
(Deeds: W/339). The graves in the cemetery 
date from 1 844 to 1 870. 



17 



WALNUT GROVE CUMBERLAND 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

This Cumberland Presbyterian 

congregation started in 1838. Services were first 
held in private homes. In 1852 Levi Hamilton 
donated land to the Rushville Presbytery on the 
SE quarter of Sec. 32 in Walnut Grove Twp. and 
the NE quarter of Sec. 5 in Macomb Twp., a 
little southeast from the cemetery (Deeds: 
0/146). In 1854 he deeded land to the Walnut 
Grove Cumberland Presbyterian Church (Deeds: 
W/339). After the first building burned in 1854, 
the second was erected. This building was 
moved to Good Hope (MDJ, 3/ 15/1872, p.2) to 
become Good Hope Cumberland Presbyterian 
Church. The original church site was used for 
annual camp meetings for a number of years 
(MDJ, 2/7/1923, p. 3). 

WALNUT GROVE POST OFFICE 

This post office, first known as Lynn, 
was established on Dec. 29, 1870 with Samuel 
P. King as postmaster. The King family land 
was located on the SE quarter of Sec. 1 in 
Walnut Grove Twp. On May 3, 1871 the name 
of the post office changed to Walnut Grove. It 
closed November 15, 1918, reopened April 18, 
1928, and finally closed in 1944. 

WALNUT GROVE SCHOOL 

See West Wahiut Grove School. 

WALNUT GROVE TOWNSHIP 

This is Congressional Township 
7North, Range 2West from the 4'^ Principal 
Meridian. The first settler in the township was 
Sidney Gear, who settled on Sec. 14 in 1835. 
Other early settlement clusters were in Sec. 27 
with (iilmore Walker in 1837, and a school 
anchoring a neighborhood located ou Sec. 16 in 
1838. 

According lo Peck (p. 219), the 
township was called both Hickory Grove and 
Walnut Grove. The name llickiiry (irove was 
the original name of Shiloh Presbyterian Church 
and is still the name of the church cemetery. 

flic name comes from a grove ol walnut 
trees which stood just across the townshiji line in 
Hushnelll wp. (1976 I listory, 48). Waliuil trees 
were consulcred piiiiie constriiclion liimhei in 
the eountv a( (he tune. 



WALNUT GROVE TOWNSHIP CHURCH 
OF THE UNITED BRETHREN IN CHRIST 

See Center Church. 

WARMACK CEMETERY 

See Waymack Cemetery. 

WASHINGTON 

This was the original name tor Macomb. 
The name was probably suggested by James 
Clarke, who was one of the first settlers in the 
county and who came from Washington County, 
Kentucky. Names of Revolutionary War heroes 
were popular at the time of the county's 
organization. (Hallwas 1990, 10). 

See Macomb. 

WAUBONSIE (INDIAN) TRAIL 

This was a much-promoted early east- 
west transcontinental automobile route. It 
predates the Cannonball Trail. The road 
commenced at Co\ ington. Indiana and went 
west via Danville, Illinois to Shenandoah, Iowa. 
The road had three branches in western Illinois, 
all of which joined in Carthage. The southern 
route went from Danville to Beardstown, 
Augusta, Bovven, Bentley and into Carthage. 
The middle route went tYom Danville to 
Carthage by way of Peoria, Canton. Bushnell, 
Macomb, Colchester, Tennessee and Colmar, 
and the northern route went through Cuba, 
Smithfield, Saville, Marietta. New Philadelphia, 
Good Hope, Sciota, Blandinsville. and La 
llarpe. All routes continued from Carthage 
westward via Keokuk. 

The three routes testify to the 
competition for roatls ushered in by increased 
use of automobiles. The best known segment of 
the Waubonsie frail in McDoiunigh C 'ount\ is 
the stretch east of Macomb along the present 
U.S. Highway 136. In 1911 and \')\2 the 
proposed route, construction, aiul upkeep oi' the 
road was supported by the local Waubonsie 
Association. The USGS map o( M)19 clearly 
labels this road. The trail was marked by 
painting tcleplnMie jioles with a white, black and 
white bands of paint. .An article m March of 
1912 in the Carthage Republican describes the 
road as being a drag-tiealeil roadbed: "'.Mter the 
'shed" has been made on the road, it will be kept 
IHTJeel b\ dragging, following each ram fhe 



IS 



farmers along the line of the trail will be 
expected to keep the dragging done." 

Waubonsie is the name of an Indian 
chief of the Pottawatomi tribe. Before the white 
settlement of western Illinois, Pottawatomi 
Indians lived in southern Wisconsin, northern 
Illinois and Indiana, and around Chicago. As 
settlers moved into Illinois, Indian presence 
became increasingly intolerable. When Black 
Hawk War broke out, Waubonsie aligned 
himself with the settlers against the Sauk and 
Fo.x tribes, the long-time enemies of the 
Pottawatomies. But, as soon as the war ended, 
pressure rose to transport all Indians west across 
the Mississippi River. Waubonsie left with his 
people in the late 1830s. He died in Iowa in 
1857. 

See also Cannonball Trail, and Indian 
Burials. 

WAYLAND CEMETERY 

See Bowlin-Wayland Cemetery. 

WAYMACK, WARMACK or WORMACK 
CEMETERY 

This is a small family burial plot located 
on the NW quarter of Sec. 9 in Bethel Twp. 
Only members of the Waymack or Warmack 
family are interred here. The land belonged to 
the family from 1836 to 1859. The cemetery is 
not shown on county maps. 

WELCH HOLLOW 

See Argyle Hollow. 

WELCH'S CREEK 

This is an intermittent water course, 
which runs through Sec. 19 of Macomb Twp. 
and empties into the East Fork La Moine River 
in the SW quarter of Sec. 20. Around 1900 this 
creek was dammed to form Shannon Lake. 

See also Shannon Lake. 

WESLEY CHAPEL CEMETERY 

This cemetery started with the Wesley 
Chapel Methodist Episcopal Church located on 
the SW quarter of the SW quarter of Sec. 18 in 
Blandinsville Twp. on land deeded in 1848 by 
Nathan Ward to the "Methodist Episcopal 
Church" (Deeds: M/51 ). The church is shown in 
atlases from 1861 to 1 91 3. The 1893 and the 



1913 atlases show both the church and the 
cemetery, but the 1919 USGS map shows only 
the cemetery, called "Chapel Cemetery." This 
cemetery is still in use. The first burial was that 
of Andy W. Ward who died m 1847. The 
cemetery also contains the grave of .lohn 
Gilfrey, a veteran of the Revolutionary War. 

WESLEY CHAPEL METHODLST 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Early county histories do not mention 
this church, but a gift of land from Nathan Ward 
to the Metht)dist Episcopal Church in 1848 
probably established the beginning date for the 
church, the cemetery, or both (Deeds: M/51). 
The deed was for the land on the SW quarter of 
the SW quarter of Sec. 1 8 in Blandinsville Twp., 
but the 1861 and 1871 maps show the church 
near the NW corner of Sec. 19, which could 
have been a mistake because no deeds could be 
found for this location. The maps from 1893 on 
show the church on Sec. 18. It closed in 1913 
(Peter, 27), but the building and cemetery appear 
on the maps through 1938. 

WEST BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH 

See Bethel Baptist Church. 

WEST BETHEL CEMETERY 

See Archer-Bethel Cemetery. 

WEST BETHEL SCHOOL 

(No. 7, Bethel Twp.; No.L32) 

The earliest school in this neighborhood 
is shown on the I 861 map. It was located on the 
SW comer of the NE quarter of Sec. 7 and was 
probably Union School No. 2 with Lamoine 
Twp. The location is confirmed by the 1847 
deed from John H. Duns worth to the Methodist 
Episcopal Church "to be used as church and 
school" (Deeds: L/326). The 1885 history states 
that the school was organized in 1862, probably 
after district reorganization, and built on the SE 
comer of Sec. 8, on land purchased from John 
A. Dunsworth (1885 History, 708). Deeds, 
however, indicate that John A. Dunsworth sold 
land to trustees in 1873 (Deeds: 62/530) and that 
this land was located on the SW comer of 
Section 8 where a school is shown on the 1871 
atlas. Sometime between 1922 and 1940 the 
school was relocated to the NE corner of the SE 



119 



quarter of Sec. 8, where it remained until 1947 
when it was consolidated into Bethel School 
District No. 133. The grounds were sold off in 
1956 (Deeds: 215/467). 

The name probably reflects the location 
of the school in the western part of the township. 

See also White Flock School and New 
Hope Methodist Episcopal Church. 

WEST BRANCH 

See Short Fork La Moine River and 
Drowning Fork. 

WEST CHALMERS SCHOOL 

See Hagan School. 

WEST PRAIRIE 

See Bushnell. 

WEST PRAIRIE PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 

This congregation of Cumberland 
Presbyterians organized as West Prairie 
Congregation in 1852, and met until 1867 in the 
Si.xteen School in Eldorado Twp. Their first 
sanctuary was built in 1867 on the SW comer of 
Sec. 9, on land deeded by Harriet Way (Deeds: 
18/570). The church was for a while called 
"New Meeting House." In 1905 a new church 
building was erected, and in 1907 the church 
was named West Prairie Presbyterian (Peter, 67- 
68). This is an active rural congregation. 

WEST RAILROAD SCHOOL 

(No. 29; Sciota Twp.) 

This sclu)ol IS shown in the 1871 and 
the 1 893 atlases on the SW comer of Sec. 29 just 
north of the railroad tracks. A gift of land from 
Thomas W. Head in 1X72 confirms the location 
(Deeds: 33/444). In 1900 the school was 
relocated one-half mile south to the SW comer 
of the NW quarter of Sec. 32, onto land deeded 
by Fielding L. Ilankins (Deeds: 85/198). It 
consolidated into the Sciota School District in 
April of 1947. 

I he name comes from the school's 
original location west from Sciota, near the 
Toledo, Peoria tV: Western Railway line. It is 
said that the school was moved because lu>bos 
slept III the building during the night. In the 
IXXOs this school was known as Head School, 



and later was called Mainline School because of 
the adjoining liainline land on Sec. 31. An 
article in the Macomb Journal for May 17, 1894 
calls the school "Railroad College." 

WEST WALNUT GROVE SCHOOL 
(No. 1, Walnut Grove Twp.; No. 10) 

The 1861 map shows this school on the 
NW quarter of the SW quarter of Sec. 12, but 
after school districts reorganized in 1863, the 
school was moved one half mile north to the 
NW comer of Sec. 12 (Clarke, 426) where it 
remained through 1949 when it consolidated 
into the Bushnell-Prairie City District. The 
building and the site sold in 1950 (Adair W. B., 
2/9/1950). No date of organization and no deeds 
tor either location could be found. 

The school was also known as Walnut 
Grove School. 

WESTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Approved by the Illinois Legislature in 
1899, Westem Illinois State Nomial School 
opened its doors in 1902. The campus was 
located at the extreme NW comer of the town of 
Macomb. Later land purchases increased the 
campus manifold. The name of the institution 
changed to retlect its expanded educational role. 
In 1921 the State Normal became Westem 
Illinois State Teachers College, in 1947 the word 
"Teachers" was dropped, and in 1957 the 
present name was adopted. The University 
campus now occupies much of the northem half 
of Sec. 36 and adjoining Sec. 25 of Emmet Twp. 

W ESTERN NORMAL COLLEGE 

This was a private institution of post- 
secondary education which opened in Bushnell 
in 1881 as Western Commercial College. It 
closed several years later aiul reopened in 1888. 
Ultimately it moved to Macomb and changed its 
name several times. It closed m 1906. 

WETZEL CHURCH 

See New Salem Christian Church. 

WETZEL S(H()OL 

(No. 8, New Salem Twp., No. 88) 

1 his school IS shown on all countv maps 
on the Nl' comer of Sec. 33 in New Salem 1 vvp. 
1 he (.late o\' orgam/alion was jMobably 1858 



120 



which was the year of the deed from William A. 
Griffin to township trustees (Deeds: 8/^)5). No 
deed could be located to verify the closing date. 

John A. Wetzel was the supernitendent 
of the New Salem Christian Church Sunday 
School, the predecessor of the church. The 
Sunday School met in the school building prior 
to the building of the church sanctuary. 

WHEAT BRIDGE 

See Wigwam Hollow Bridge. 

WHITE CEMETERY 

This is a family cemetery located on the 
NW quarter of the NE quarter of Sec. 9 in 
Tennessee Twp. The 1871 atlas shows this land 
belonging to the White tamily. Burials date 
from 1843 to 1900. The cemetery is shown only 
in the 1893 and the 1913 atlases. Thomas 
While, a soldier in the Revolutionary War, was 
buried here in 1843. 

WHITE FLOCK CEMETERY 

This cemetery, also called Lewis, 
Jenkins, Payne, Bayles, Gibson, Sanford, and 
Rice, is located on the NW comer of Sec. I 1 in 
Lamoine Twp. The burials date from 1843. It is 
still in use, administered by the Cemetery 
Association. No land deeds could be located. 

The many names of the cemetery come 
from adjacent land owners and mterments. 

WHITE FLOCK CHURCH 

This congregation started as Union 
Baptist Church of Bethel Township. The group 
held services near Fandon until 1866 when it 
built a separate house of worship on the SE 
comer of the NE quarter of Sec. 1 1 in Lamoine 
Twp. on land deeded to "Union Baptist Church" 
by Joel L. Santbrd (Deeds: 18/164). Over the 
years the building housed three deni)minations. 
The first church was Baptist, then the building 
belonged to the Methodist denomination (1885 
History, 664), and when the sanctuary was 
rebuilt in 1905, Charles H. Hendricks donated 
land to the Congregational Christian Church "to 
be used for church purposes forever" (Deeds: 
91/621). The church operated until about 1950 
when it was moved four miles southeast to 
become Eagle Community Church. 



The name "White Flock" is attributed to 
Hannah Wilson Stookey, who with her husband 
organized the congregation. According to Jake 
Twaddle, "Mrs. Stookey suggested that since the 
parishioners were all white with no other color 
or nationality and, since the people seemed to 
flock together very well, they should call the 
church 'White Flock"." (Naming). 

See also Eagle Community Church. 

WHITE FLOC K SCHOOL 

(No. 2, Lamoine Twp.; No. 120) 

This school is known to have existed 
prior to the 1 850s. It was possibly located on 
the north half of Section 5, but no deed could be 
located. The 1861 map shows a school on the 
SW corner of the NE quarter of Section 1 1, at 
the jog in the road called "Rice's Corner." The 
1871 atlas shows two schools, one on the NE 
corner of the NW quarter of Section 12 and the 
other on the west side of the NW quarter of 
Section 11. It seems that the school shown on 
Section 12 was a union school with District 
No. 2 of Bethel Twp., which later became West 
Bethel School District. The 1876 atlas, the 1885 
history, and all later maps place the school on 
the NE corner of Sec. 1 1 . These grounds were 
sold off in 1956 (Deeds: 215/423). 

The church, the school and the cemetery 
defined the surrounding neighborhood as "White 
Flock." The name persisted well into the 1930s. 

See also Rice's Comer. 

WHITE HALL SCHOOL 

See Mound School. 

WHITTINGTON CEMETERY 

See Old Plymouth Cemetery. 

WIDOW MOORE CEMETERY 

See Moore Cemetery (Colchester Twp.) 

WIDOW TAISE GRAVE 

According to the 1885 history, a widow 
who died in 1834 was buried on the NW quarter 
of Sec. 4 in Tennessee Twp. The grave is not 
marked ( 18S5 History. 564). 

WIGWAM BRANCH 

This is a small tributary of the East Fork 
La Moine River in Sec. 26 of Emmet Twp. 



121 



WIGWAM HOLLOW 

This ravine is formed by the Wigwam 
Branch. It is said that Indians pitched their tents 
here while on their annual hunting trips 
(Jackson). Clarke's history relates that the early 
settlers in Macomb resented Indians hunting in 
the neighborhood and in the early 1830s 
whipped them, "so that they would not return" 
(Clarke. 19). Another source states that an old 
Indian lived alone in the ravine, and thus gave it 
its name (Harris, 1988). 

This is very steep ravine. The Wigwam 
Branch empties into the marshy bottomland of 
the East Fork La Moine River making the ravine 
rather inaccessible. It is possible that Indians 
favored the ravine as a place to set up their camp 
in relative safety and isolation from white 
settlers. 

WIGWAM HOLLOW BRIDGE 

This bridge was first known as Wheat 
Bridge, because it was located on the edge of the 
Wheat family farm. When Western Illinois 
State Teachers College purchased the farm m 
1955, the bridge was renamed for the hollow, 
because it crosses the East Fork La Moine River 
just east from the Wigwam Branch and Hollow. 

WIGWAM HOLLOW CEMETERY 

See Old Macomb Cemetery. 



No deed could be found. The school remained 
in the location and is shown on all county maps 
until it consolidated into the Bardolph School 
District in 1947. The grounds were sold in 1947 
(McDonough C.T., 7/31/1947), but again no 
deeds could be located. The building was 
moved to Macomb, where it served for a number 
of years as a country school museum called 
Watson, after Clarence Watson on whose land it 
was located. 

WILHELM CEMETERY 

This was the family cemetery for nine 
families from 1850 to 1887. The cemetery is 
located on the south side of the NW quarter of 
Sec. 23 in Industry Twp., one hundred feet east 
of Peak Cemetery. The cemetery is not used any 
more. It is named for Welcome Wilhelm who in 
1861 donated land "for the use of public burying 
ground" (Deeds: 52/33). The cemetery is 
marked on the 1893 and the 1913 atlases. 

WILLEY CEMETERY or GRAVEYARD 

Located on the SW comer of the NE 
quarter of Sec. 35 in Bethel Twp., this is a 
family cemetery on private land. Burials date 
from 1841 to 1918. The cemetery is named for 
Charles Willey. who is listed as the owner of the 
quarter section in the 1871 and 1893 atlases. 
The cemetery is not shown on maps. 



WILD AFRICA CHURCH 

This church v\as located ou tiic SE 
comer of Sec. 34 in Tennessee Tup. It is 
believed it was a Primitive Baptist congregation. 

The name of the church retlected its 
remoteness. Access was through a quarter mile 
of timber from all directions. The church closed 
m 1914 (1976 History. 47). No deeds could be 
found to verify dates of building and dissolution. 

WILDVVOOD HAVEN 

See Shaw Creek. 

WILEY or WILLEN S( HOOL 
(No. 8, Macomb I >vp.; No. 67) 

Ihe t'irsi school building on tiie NI" 
corner of Sec. 34 \sas built in 1863 and a new 
building erected in 1S77. The school, already 
called Wiley by ( iaike (p. 425), was named 
after .lohii \\'ik-\ on uiiose land it was localetl. 



WILLIAMS BRIDGE 

This was an important bridge o\er the 
East Fork La Moine River on the NE quarter of 
the SE quarter of Sec. 6 of Colchester Twp. The 
1861 map shows the bridge on the road from 
Macomb to Carthage ne.xt to the early Bacon 
Mill. It is not known wh> the bridge was named 
Williams. 

WILLOW CREEK 

This small stream tlows through 
sections 35 and 36 of Bethel Twp., and empties 
into the La Moine Ri\er in HrookKn Twp., 
Schuyler County. 

WILLOW (;R()\ E (IINITED BRETHREN) 
C HLR( II 

I he "Willow Clro\e Class." which 
organized in I Sd'). met in the Piosperit\ Hall 
where United Hrelhren iiiinislers preached to lite 



faithful from 1867 on. The meetings eontiniied 
in the Hall until 1872 when a sanetuary was built 
on the SE corner of the NW quarter of See. 1 m 
Hire Twp., on land deeded hy John B. Isom to 
the "Prosperity Chureh of the United Brethren" 
(Deeds: 33/339). A new building was erected in 
the same location in 1915. (Hainline). The 
church ceased to function in 1966. 

The church and school anchored a 
neighborhood still known by this name. 

See also Prosperity Hall and German 
Methodist Chureh. 

WILLOW GROVE SCHOOL 
(No. 1, Hire Twp.; No. 40) 

This school was built in 1862 (Clarke, 
p.432). The 1871 and the 1876 atlases show it 
on the NE quarter of the NE quarter of Sec. 1 1, 
but no land deed could be located. In 1881 
William Griffith (Deeds; 46/430) and John Q. 
Hainline (Deeds: 47/255) deeded to school 
trustees land which was located on the SW 
corner of the SE quarter of See. 1. where the 
school is shown on all maps starting with 1893. 
It closed in 1946 and the grounds passed into 
private ownership in 1959 (Deeds: 230/1 16). 

WILLOW GROVE SCHOOL 

(No. 6, Sciota Twp.; No. 25) 

This school district was organized in 
1871 when the former District No. 5 was split 
into District No. 1, Bumsville. and District No. 
6. Willow Grove (Clarke, 429). The school was 
built in 1872 on the SE comer of Sec. 14 where 
it is shown on all county maps from 1 893 to the 
1940s, when it was consolidated mto the 
Northwest School District # 175. 

( Bushnell Record , calls this school 
Yaple (5/15/1885), probably after James M. 
Yaple who owned land in Sec. 13 and 14. 

WH.SON GRAVES (Blandinsville Twp.) 

This small burial plot on James 
Wilson's land has only three graves, the earliest 
in 1836. The site is on the SW quarter of the 
SW quarter of Sec. 20 in Blandinsville Twp. 

WILSON GRAVES (Emmet Twp.) 

These are unmarked graves of Mark and 
Bessie Wilson located on the SW quarter of Sec. 
33 in Emmet Twp. (Pioneers, 276, 3 IM). 



WILSON'S MILL (Chalmers Twp.) 

Macomb Journal mentions "Wilson & 
Luce Mill" located "a few miles southwest of 
Macomb" (7/30/1852, p2:2), and three years 
later "John O.C. Wilson Mill" (4/13/1855. 
p. 2:6). In 1856 this sawmill was located on the 
NW quarter of the NW quarter of Sec. 14 in 
Chalmers Twp. (R.S.R.) and the 1861 map 
shows a "sawmill" on the site, ne.xt to the road 
from Macomb to Middletown and Quincy. The 
1871 map, however, shows the mill across the 
road on the NE corner of Section 15. The land 
in both locatietns was the property of J. O.C. 
Wilson, one time mayor of Macomb. Because 
the mill is not mentioned in 1850 (Products of 
Industry), it probably started between 1850 and 
1852. The 1865 Illinois Census lists Robert 
Saffle operating a sawing mill in Chalmers Twp. 
No later reference to the mill was found. 

WILSON'S MILL (Emmet Twp.) 
See NewelEs Mill. 

WOLF GROVE 

This was a settlement which predates 
Bardolph. It was located between the NE 
quarter of Sec. 24 in Macomb Twp. and the 
adjacent parts of Sec. 18 in Mound Twp. The 
first settlers in the neighborhood were George 
Miller in 1828 and Joseph Smith in 1830. The 
name is first mentioned in 1832 (Deeds: A/75). 
Wolf Grove was on the Old Galena Trail. 

Early county histories tell of organized 
wolf hunts in the neighborhood. The name 
persisted well after the wolves became extinct. 

See also Bardolph. 

WOLF GROVE POST OFFICE 

This forerunner of the Bardolph Post 
Office was established on May 1, 1840, with 
Durham Creel, an early settler in the area, as 
postmaster. The post office was discontinued on 
Sept. 12, 1840. 

See also Bardolph Post Office. 

WOLFDEN or WOLF DEN BRANCH 

This stream lltiws from northwest to 
southeast through sections 21, 22, 27, and 26 
and empties into Sugar Creek in See. 25 of 
Eldorado Twp. The Tanner map of 1823 calls 
this creek "Seal Cr." 



123 



The name probably reflects the presence 
of wolves during the early years of white 
occupancy. There is no explanation for "Seal." 

WORCHESTER POST OFFICE 

Established on November 18, 1834, this 
post office is one of the oldest in the county. Its 
early existence was tenuous. It discontinued on 
July 27, 1835, started operation again on 
November 27, 1835, and discontinued again on 
November 20, 1846. No records exist that it was 
reestablished, but in 1847 it shows on the NW 
comer of Sec. 5 in Tennessee Twp., a quarter 
mile west from Friendship Church and Cemetery 
(R.S.R., 12), and Chapman's map for 1857 
locates "Worchester" on the SE quarter of Sec. 
32 in Hire Twp. 

The name is probably after one of many 
such place names in the eastern part of the U.S. 

See also Friendship Post Office. 

WORMACK CEMETERY 

See Waymack Cemetery. 

WRICHT CEMETERY 

According to a list of cemeteries from 
the Office of the Veterans Administration 
published in the Industry Press for 5/23/1967, 
this cemetery was located in Tennessee Twp., 
but no other mention or knowledge of it could be 
found. None of the Wright burials in 
McDonough County are in Tennessee Twp., but 
William and Jacob Wright are listed as living in 
the township in the 1860 census (p. 692-693). 
The location of the cemetery could not be 
established. 



124 



Y,Z 



YAPLE SCHOOL 

See Willow Grove School (Sciota Twp). 

YARD or YARDS SCHOOL 
(No. 3, Emmet Twp.; No. 57) 

This school was located on the south 
side of the NW quarter of Sec. 29. The building 
is shown on all county maps from 1S61 to 1940, 
but no deed could be located to verify the date of 
construction. The school was known as 
"Hardscrabble" as early as the 1 850s and the 
name persisted well into the 1890s. An article in 
the Macomb Journal announced the opening of 
a post otTice called Myron and located in the 
Hardscrabble area, si.x miles north of Colchester 
(6/22/1893, p. 5). The school is again 
mentioned in the May 29, 1896 issue of the 
Macomb Dailv Journal , reporting on the reunion 
of past pupils of the school. However, the 
school was also known as Yard from 1878 until 
it closed in the early 1950s. The lot was sold in 
1952 (Deeds: 206:507). 

The name Yard refers to the Yard family 
whose members were school directors and 
whose land surrounded the school grounds. 

See also Brick Yard School and Prairie 
View School. 

YOCUM SCHOOL 

(No. 4, New Salem Twp.; No. 83) 

This school was probably built in 1857 
after the township was divided into nine 
districts. The 1861 map shows it on the SW 
comer of Sec. 17. and the 1871 and all later 
maps on the adjacent NW comer of Sec. 20. 
Two land deeds confirm these locations. An 
1 880 deed from Stephen Blackstone was for the 
lot on the SW comer of Sec. 17 (Deeds: 42/467), 
and an 1880 gift of land by William Harlan was 
for the NW comer of Sec. 20 (Deeds: 47/1 16). 
The school existed through 1946, when the land 
was sold off (Deeds: 189/375). 



The name was probably for John 
Yocum. the only male child of Stephen and 
Mary Yocum, who was killed at Stone River in 
the Civil War. The school was also widely 
known as Blackstone. 

YOUNG POST OFFICE 

This post office was established on 
August 21, 1840 with postmaster James 
Edmonston, one of the co-founders of 
Middleton. It was discontinued on Aug. 31, 
1863 to be succeeded by the Middleton Post 
Office. 

In 1854 and 1855 Dr. George II. Young 
was known to have practiced medicine in the 
Doddsville-Middleton area and was also selling 
stamps, thus serving as a postmaster. He died in 
1857 and was buried in the Gibson Cemetery. 

See also Fandon Post Office. 

ZANESVILLE 

This was the name of a town plat 
recorded for Joseph Wright on August 23, 1839 
(Mortgages: A/546), The location was on the 
SE quarter of the NW quarter of Sec. 7 in 
Mound Twp. The town does not show on any 
county map. It was obviously one of several 
paper towns in the county and not even the name 
has survived locally. 

ZION CHAPEL FREE METHODIST 
CHURCH 

This church is shown only on the 1919 
map of the county and was located on the NE 
comer of the SE quarter of Sec. 10 in Lamoine 
Twp. on land owned by Joseph Duncan. An 
1895 land deed from Joseph Duncan to the Zion 
Chapel Church (Deeds: 76/581) was probably 
the building date. When the land reverted back 
to Duncan in 1913 (Deeds: 1 17/260), the church 
was listed as "Zion Chapel Free Methodist 
Church." It was also known as Duncan Church. 



12.5 



NOTES / BIBLIOGRAPHY 

(ADAIR) 

History of Adair, by L.F. Pontius. N. P., 1970. 

(ADAIR W.B.) 

Adair Weekly Beacon. 

(BARDOLPH) 

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(BENSON) 

Ervin Benson, late of Macomb, 111. - oral communication. 

(BIBLE) 

Reader's Dictionary of the Bible , ed. By Stephen Neil. New York: Association Press, 
1966. 

(BLOOMER) 

Harlan Boomer, late of McDonough County oral communication. 

(BUSHNELL) 

Bushnell, Illinois Centennial. 1854-1954 . 1954 

(CALVERT) 

Pauline Calvert, late of Blandinsville, 111. - oral communication. 

(CEMETERIES) 

Lester, Duane. Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County, Illinois. N.p.: Schuyler-Brown 
Historical and Genealogical Society, 1976-1980. 

(CLARKE) 

Clarke, C. J. History of McDonough County, Illinois. Springfield, 111.: Lusk, 1878. 

(COMMISSIONERS) 

McDonough County Commissioners Court Record . 1830-1856. 

(CRABB) 

Crabb, Martha. "Guy Church" in NEWSLETTER, v. 3:4, p. 2. 

(CURTIS) 

Curtis, Nellie. "East Bethel Church" in NEWSLETTER, v. 4:2, p. 2-6. 

(DEEDS) 

[McDonough County, III. Recorder] Deed Record , 1817- 

127 



(DISCOVERY) 

Hennepin, Louis. A New Discovery of a Vast Country in America . 1903. V. 1, p. 152. 

(DRURY) 

Drury, John. This is McDonough County. Illinois . Chicago: Loree Company, 1955. 

(DYSON) 

Bateman, Newton. Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois ...and History of Schuyler County , 
edited by Howard F. Dyson. Chicago, 1908. 

(ELTING) 

Elting, Philip E. "The Valley of the River La Moine" in MDJ, 2/15/1927. 

(1885 HISTORY) 

History of McDonough County, Illinois. Springfield, III.: Continental Historical Co., 
1885. 

(ELDORDO) 

Baughman, Neva I. "History of Eldorado Township." Ms typescript. WIU Archives. 1976. 

(FRAZER) 

Frazer, Timothy and June Frazer. "Place Name Patterns in McDonough County, Illinois," 
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137. 

(40^" ANNIVERSARY) 

Lutheran Church in Macomb . Np: nd. [location: WIU Archives and Special Collections] 

(GENEALOGY) 

McDonough County Genealogical Society. News Quarterly 1979- 

(GRIMM) 

Libby Grimm late of Macomb, 111 - oral communication. 

(GRIMM, 2002) 

Grimm, Libby. "McDonough County. Illinois. Cemeteries Location Maps and Index." 
Revised, fypescnpt. WIU Archives. 2002. 

(GRIMM, 1991) 

(irimm. Libby. "Larkins Cemetery - Walnut Ciro\c Township." MS typescript. WIU 
Archives. 1991. 

(IIAINI.INi:) 

kulh llainline. "Willow Gio\e Church of Hire Jownship" in Nl WSLLTTER 4:4 6-9. 



I2S 



(MAINLINE, L.) 

Lyman Hainline, late of Macomb, 111. - oral communication 

(HALLWAS, 1984) 

Hallwas, John E. McDonough County Heritage. Macomb, ill.: llluiois Heritage Press, 
1984. 

(HALLWAS, 1990) 

Hallwas, John E. Macomb, a Pictorial History. St. Louis, Missouri: G. Bradley Publish., 
1990. 

(HARRIS, 1983) 

Harris, Marge. St Paul's Catholic Cemetery. 

(HARRIS, 1987) 

Harris Marge. "Sugar Creek" in NEWSLETTER, 6:3/5. 

(HARRIS, 1988) 

Harris, Marge. "The McDonough Historical Society, 1920-21" in NEWSLETTER 7:2/2. 

(HARRIS, M) 

Marge Harris, Macomb, 111. - oral communication. 

(HARRIS, Z.) 

Alexander Harris, Macomb, III. oral communication. 

(HOLMES) 

Holmes, Alc.x. History and Reminiscences of Alex Holmes, Macomb, Illinois . Macomb: 
Bystander Press, 1923. 

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[McDonough County, lU.j. Power of Attorney and Certificate of Incorporation Record. 

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Jackson, James B. "Crooked Creek." MS, WIU Archives; NEWSLETTER 6:2/4. 

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Yesterdays of Jerusalem Community. N.p., 1977. 

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Hutchins, Thomas. Topographical Description of Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland and 
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Illinois, Mississippi.... London, 1778. 

(LAWS) 

Laws of State of Illinois for 1837 . 

129 



(LEHNER) 

Lehner, Walter H. A Geographic Study of Clay Mining in McDonough County. Illinois . 
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(MAPS) 

Thompson. Morris M. Maps for America: Cartographic Products of the U. S. 
Geological Survey and Others. Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1997. 

(MARRIAGES) 

McDonough County Genealogical Society. McDonough County Marriages . Macomb, 
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(MAVIS) 

Mavis, Edith F. Home Grown . N.p., 1947. 

(MCDERMOTT, 1941) 

A Glossary of Mississippi Valley French. 1673-1850 . St. Louis: Washington University 
Studies - New Series - Language and Literature, no. 12. 1941. p. 123. 

(MCDERMOTT. 1982) 

McDermott. John Francis. "The French Impress on Place Names in the Mississippi 
Valley," in Journal of the Illinois Historical Society . 75:4, p. 230-231. 1982. 

(MCDONOUGH C.T.) 

McDonough County Times . 

(McLEAN) 

Bateman Newton. Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois ... and History of McDonough 
County , ed. by Alexander McLean. Chicago, 1907. 

(Ml)J) 

Macomb Daily Journal. 4/1894-/7/1988. 

(MINUTES) 

McDonough (^)unty Court of Supervisors. [ Minutes of Meetings ]. 1856- 

(MISCELLANi;OUS) 

[McDonough County. Ill.| Miscellaneous Record . 

(MJ) 

Macomb Journal. 1 86 1 - 4/ 1 894: 7/ 1 988- 

(MOON) 

Moon, June. Mullu m in Parvo: a llislc>ry of Colchester. Illinois . Colchester. Illinois: The 
Colchester Chronicle. 1956. 



30 



(MORTGAGES) 

[McDonough County, III. Recorder]. Mortgage Record , 1836- 

(NAMES) 

Illinois Place Names , compiled by James N. Adams. Springtleld, Illinois: Illinois State 
Historical Society, 1968. 

(NAMING) 

"The Nammg of White Flock," in The Business News , 3/5/1980, p.4 

(NEWSLETTER) 

McDonough Historical Society Newsletter . Macomb, 111.: The Society, 1982- 

(1976 HISTORY) 

McDonough County, Illinois I826-I976 Sesquicentennial . Colchester, III, 1976. 

(1992 HISTORY) 

The History of McDonough County Illinois , compiled by Ruth Chenoweth and Sara 
Wisslead Semonis. Curtis Media Corporation, 1992. 

(OLD CEMETERY) 

HaiTis. Marjorie Guy. The Old Cemetery . N.p., 1984. 

(PACE) 

Tom Pace 

(PAYNE) 

Verl Payne 

(PECK) 

Peck, J. M. A Gazetteer of Illinois . Philadelphia: Grigg & Elliot, 1837. 

(PETER) 

Churches of McDonough County, lUmois , compiled by Viyian S. Peter and Martha B. 
Hotchkiss. Macomb, 111.: McDonough County Genealogical Society, 1986. 

(PIONEERS) 

Harris, Marjorie Guy. Emmet Township Pioneers . Macomb, 111.: McDonough County 
Genealogical Society, 1986. 

(PLACENAMES) 

19"' Century American Placenames . 

(PLATS) 

[McDonough County, III. Recorder.] Plat Record , 1834- 



131 



(POSTMASTERS) 

Record of Appointment of Postmasters, 1832 - Sep. 30, 1971 . National Archives 
Microfilm Publications, M0841 Roll#29(Loc. 148-1) 

(POWERS) 

Powers, Abraham. Sunshine and Shadows . N.p., 1895. 

(PRODUCTS OF INDUSTRY) 

U. S. Census, 1850. State of Illinois Products of Industry. McDonough County. 

(PROVINE) 

Provine, George W. "History of Camp Creek and Ebenezer Churches." Ms typescript, 
WIU Archives, 1875. 

(REDMAN) 

Gerald Redman, late of Macomb, 111. 

(REGAN) 

Regan, John. The Emigrant's Guide to the Western States of America: or Backwoods and 
Prairies . Edinburgh; Oliver & Boyd, 1852. 

(REN) 

Lee Ren of Good Hope, 111. - oral communication. 

(REZAB) 

Rezab, Gordana. "The Memoir of William T. Brooking, McDonough County Pioneer," in 
Western Illinois Regional Studies , vol. 4: no. 1-2, 1981. 

(RINEHART) 

Hillsgrove, Illinois: Its Early History , edited by Eva Gilchrist Rinchart. Carthage, III.: S. 
C. Davidson, 1925. 

(ROAD) 

"Our Road Agent." [Articles in the Macomb Daily Journal , 1890, transcribed by Marge 
llarris|. lypcscript, WIU Archives, 1982. 

(ROl.OFSON) 

Rolofson, Helen and Blanche Ilainline. The Story of Blandinsville and Hire Townships . 
Blaiulins\ illc. 111.: Rolofson Printing Scr\ ice, 196S. 

(RSR) 

[McDonough County, 111. RccordLT|. Road Survey Record , 1846-1889. 

(S( IIOOI. Pl.AIS) 

[ Scho ol District PlatsJ Macomb, III.: McDonough Couiil\ Superintendent of Schools, 
1 859- 1 860. 

132 



(SCHUYLER) 

Schuyler County, Illinois History . Dallas, Texas: L of C, 1983. 

(SHADWICK) 

Shadwick, George W. History of McDonough County, Illinois . Moline, III.: Desaulniers, 
1968. 

(SHELLEY) 

Marilyn Shelley, Colchester, 111. - oral communication. 

(SITE) 

U.S. Post Office Department. Report of Site Locations , 1837-1950. National Archives 
Microfilm Publications, Ml 126, Roll # 147 (Illinois: Livingston-McLean). 

(SOUVENIR) 

Souvenir of Blandinsville. Illinois, 1906 . N.p.: John H. Bayless. 

(ST. PAUL) 

Krauser, Alice. A History of St. PauFs Church, 1857-1986 . The Church, 1986. 

(STICKLE) 

"The Stickle Cemetery" Macomb Eagle , 7/29/2003, p. 4. 

(STICKLEN) 

Marjorie Sticklen, late of Macomb, 111. - oral communication. 

(TAYLOR) 

Taylor, Isaac. Ethnology and Geography, or Etymological Illustrations of History . 
London: George Rutledge, 1909; Detroit: GaleResearch Book Tower, 1968. 

(TEMPLE) 

Temple, Wayne C. Indian Villages of the Illinois Counties . Springfield, 111.: Illinois State 
Museum, 1966. 

(THORMAN) 

Tina Thorman, Macomb, 111 oral communication. 

(TOLAND) 

Harry Toland, late of Macomb, 111. - oral communication. 

(TORRANCE) 

Clifton Torrance, late of Good Hope, 111. oral communication. 

(VIZDAL) 

Maria Vizdal, Macomb, 111. - oral communication. 



133 



(WEBB) 

Robert L. Webb, Carthage, III. - oral communication. 

(WELCH) 

Virginia Welch, late of Macomb and Colchester, 111. - oral communication. 

(WESLEY) 

Wesley Church Records, Macomb, 111 . Western Illinois University Archives. 

(WILLEY) 

Willey, Esther F. "The Free Methodist Church at Mt. Zion, Bethel Township" 
in NEWSLETTER, v. 5:1, p. 4-7. 

(WOLF) 

"Wolf Grove Settlement in Macomb Township - 6 N 2w, McDonough County, Illinois," 
compiled by Alexander V. and Marjorie Harris. Ms typescript, WIU Archives, 1982. 

(YOUNG) 

Young, E. Horton. A History of Round Prairie and Plymouth, 1<S3I-1875 . Chicago: Geo. 
J.Titus, 1876. 



34 



MAPS AND ATLASES CONSULTED 

(chronological order) 

1778 Hutchins, Thomas. A New Map of the Western Parts of Virginia. Pennsylvania and 
North Carolina . . . the Whole of the Illinois River . . . . London. 

1796 Bradley, Abraham. Map of the United States: E.xhibiting the Post-roads & Distances.... 
Philadelphia: s. n. 

1816- Unites States. Surveyor General. Illinois Township Plats . St. Louis: Surveyor's Office. 

1818 Melish, John. "United States of America," in Letters from Illinois by Morris Birkback. 
Philadelphia: M. Carey. 

1823 Tanner. Henry S. Illinois and Missouri . Philadelphia: Tanner. 

1834 Mitchell, S. Augustus. Map of the States of Ohio. Indiana and Illinois. Philadelphia: 
Mitchell. 

1836 Burr, David H. Map of Illinois with Parts of Indiana, Wisconsin, &c . Washington, D.C. 

1838 Robinson. Lewis. Map of Illinois. Akron, Ohio: Robinson. 

1838 Jones, A. D. Illinois and the West with a Township Map. Boston: Weeks, Jordan. 

1839 Burr, David H. Map of Illinois and Missouri... Washington, D.C: Geographer to the 
House of Representatives of the U.S. 

1844 Morse, Sidney E. and Samuel Breese. Illinois. [N. Y.?] 

1852 Map of the Chief Parts of the Western States, Including Western Virginia . 
Philadelphia: A.S. Mitchell. 

1854 Morse. Sidney E. Illinois . New York: [Morse?] 

1855 Illinois . New York: J. H. Colton & Co. 

1857 Chapman, Silas. Chapman's Sectional Map of Illinois . Milwaukee. Wis.: Dyer & 
Pasmore. 

1861 Folsom's Ouarter Sectional Map of McDonough County, Illinois. Chicago: E. Mendel. 

1864 Illinois . New York: Shoenberg & Co. 

1867 Mitchell, S. Augustus. County Map of the State of Illinois . Philadelphia: Mitchell. 



135 



1 868 Colton's Sectional Map of the State of Illinois . New York: W.G. and C.B. Colton. 

1870 Colton's New Sectional Map of the State of Illinois . New York: W.G. and C.B. Colton. 

1871 Atlas Map of McDonough County. Illinois. Davenport, Iowa: Andreas, Lyter, & Co. 

1874 An Illustrated Historical Atlas of Hancock County, Illinois . Chicago: A.T. Andreas. 

1875 Worthen. Amos H. Geological Map of the State of Illinois . [Springfield, 111.]: Published 
by legislative authority. 

1876 Atlas of the State of Illinois . Chicago: Warner & Beers. 

1879 C\)lton's Map of the United States of America ... . New York: G.W. and C.B. Colton. 

1879 Hussey, J. R. School Map of the State of Illinois . Philadelphia: F. Bourquin. 

1893 Plat Book of McDonough County, Illinois . Chicago: Occidental Publishing. 

1913 Standard Atlas of McDonough County, Illinois . Chicago: G.A. Ogle. 

1915 McDonough County, Illinois . Chicago: Geographical Publication Co. 

1919 U.S. Geological Survey. Topographical Map of McDonough County Illinois . 
Springfield, 111.: Illinois Department of Registration and Education. 

1922 Kenyon's Highway Map of Illinois. Des Moines, Iowa. 

1922 Howa, W. A. Farm Ownership Map and Plat Book Guide of McDonough County, 
Illinois . Peoria: Howat. 

1924 Hmmerson, Lewis S. Illinois Official Auto Trails Map . Springfield. 111.: Illinois Secretary 
of State. Automobile Department. 

1940 1940 McDonough County Atl as. Sterling, III.: Chestnut Map. 

1992 McD()nough County 911 Rural Directory . [Macomb, lll.|: Western Illinois Lhiiversity. 
Department of Geography. Laboratory for Geographic Information Systems. 



136 



Appendix 




137 



B 



H 



Co I cHester- 
Towosh I p ij eooih RD 



Cho I met- s Towi-\sh i p 



N GOOth RO 




13S 



BLANDINSVILLE 



N 240011) RD 



R 4 U 
Henderson Co-jntv 



N 240OU1 RD 




■■' laOOli RD 



BLANDINSVILLE 
I 



Hire TownsK t p 
R 4 W 



» 1600th RB 



139 



B U 



H N 



L 



L 



N aOOth RD 



R I U 
Prairie City Towr~ish i p 



V aooth 




180(Hh RD 



C'loi.jr.d Towr-isH I p \ UURPffV RD ^ 

R I W 



N IflOOlh RD 



140 



C H A L M E R 



R 3 U 
Ennme t Townsh i p 




Be IKe 1 Townsh i p 
R 3 U 



COLCHESTER 



R 3 W 
Emme t Towosh i p 
N 12OOU1 RD 




Lamo I r\& 
Towosh I p 



Bethel 
Townsh I p 



R 4 W R 3 u 



14: 



ELDO RA DO 



N 600th RD 



R t U 
New So I em Towosh 1 1 



N 600th RD 




ScHoy I er Cocjt-^ t y 
R I W 

CO Ce¥^^>d^t-U I U end McOct-«3m:^ Co-r-kv 9ll- 



N Olh RD 



143 



M M 



E 



T 



R 3 W 

Sc iota Towr-\sh i p 




Co I ches t er Townvsh i p 



R 3 U (y^a I nnor Towosh i p 



144 



H 



I R E 



N IBOOti RO 



f? 4 W 

lo-,d.osv, I (e Towr^sh, 




N laXHh KD 



Ni2omhRD ARGYLE LAKE 
STATE PARK 

Co I ches I er Townsh i p 



<C5 Cc*»^l^t-W I U, cr^ ncftanoi.^ Cci^tv 9"- 



145 



INDUSTRY 



R 2 W 
Sco t I cr-id Towr-ishi i p 




N 0th RD 



Schuyler County ""^ "^ 

R 2 W 



146 



L A M I N E 



N 600lh RD 



R 4 U 

Teooessee TowmsK 



Co I ches t er 
Towosh I p 




147 



M 



A 



C 







M 



B 



N 1800th RD 



R 2 U 
Wa I rxj t Gr ove Towr\sh i p 



N IBOOlh RD 




■' OOCXXXOOOOOOOOCOXxXOOOCOW 

Sco I I csr\d Townsh i p 
R 2 w 



US Hry 136 



14S 



MOUND 



N leOOlh RD 



R I W 
Bushoe I I Townsh i p 



N IBOOlh RD 




New So 1 em Towrish i p 
R I u 



I IP ■■ ■ ■■ 1 I1» ■ III 1 IJT 

N 12OOU1 RD 



149 



NEW 



SALEM 




E I dor ado Towr\sH i p 
R I u 



50 



R 



R I 



Y 



N 24001b RD 

I I L 1 I i I I :x 



R I U 




PRAIRIE 

CITY "P, C 

AIRPORT 5 

>- 



N aOOUi RD 



Towr-isH I p 
R I W 



151 







T 



N 240Otli KD 



R 3 W 
Uor- r en Coun I y 



N 24001b RD 



' I I I I I I T. 




X 

c 

3 





0) z 
'" 



ch 





3 



Emmet Towrvsh i p 
R 3 U 



SCOTLAND 



R 2 W 
Macomb Towosh i p 



US Route 136 




IncListry Township 
R 2 w 



153 



TENNESSEE 



N 1200th Rd 



R 4 W 
Hire Towosh i p 



N liOOlh 



C 

D 



z U 

I/) _y 

- 8 

u 

c 



r 




a 

X 

w 

c 

3 




L 


w 
u 



o 



z 
in 



N 600lh RD 



Lorno I ne TowosK i p 
R 4 u 



154 



w 



A 



L 



N 



G 



R 







U T 

V E 



R 2 U 
Wcr r en Cour> t y 



GOOD 
HOPE 




N IBOOlh RB 



Macomb Townsh i p 



R 2 U 



155 



McDonough County, Illinois 





WESTERN 

ILLINOIS 

UNIVERSITY